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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 9/16/2009 5:59:34 PM EST
I have been looking online without much luck.

I am just looking for a general idea of what some sort of base, crushed limestone, 1 1/2 rock or some gravel might be. I have finished getting the height where i want it on the road I cut to the cabin I am building and my drainage worked out (learned this one the hard way after finally getting rain after about a year without); however, I am looking for something a little firmer than the sand I have in the area to throw on top. I have got the sand tamped down well, but it I think some sort of aggregate will be the way to go.

I would assume that ordering from a local place is the best way to go, I just don't want to walk in there like some ass clown and just say okie dokie to whatever price they throw out. In addition, can anyone help me with how much to expect for having a truck deliver it?

I have a skid steer to use, so I don't have to worry about getting it spread, just looking for some ball park prices before I call tomorrow. Thank you.

I will get pics posted in a bit. My original thread went into the land of archives and I haven't made the team member jump yet.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 6:10:33 PM EST
Hey coconut1,

I can tell you what I have been paying up here in Washington. I have my guy bring in a 10 yard dump truck at a time and its $110 for base rock... This must be 2-3 inch stuff and is a little cheaper than the 3/4 minus top coat at I believe $135 a load. He charges me $75 hour for machine and operator to spread it but I only have him come in when I need a couple things done anyway. A feel that a good drive way is an investment, you'll be driving on those rocks for years!

Hope this helps?

Prepper
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 6:23:01 PM EST
That is tremendous. Thank you very much. Looks like a load is within purchase soon :D
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 6:33:44 PM EST
Check several local places to find out what type of materials are available(shell, limerock, crushed asphalt, #57 gravel, etc). Trucking will depend on distance from pit to your place.(~$60.00 - $75.00 hour average?). Crushed concrete will be VERY dusty so I would pass on that.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 7:46:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 7:13:51 AM EST by coconut1]
Thank you, that does help. We are very dry, so that is a good thing to consider.

Here are some pics of what I have so far, 1 day a week, very limited budget, 1-2 guys helping and no real experience.

Here's what I have on the cabin so far.


Here is wha tI have done for cutting, clearing, and developing a road. it has been raised along with the parking area sicne these pics, but I did not have a camera with me today.





Link Posted: 9/16/2009 8:42:25 PM EST
How far away from a coal power plant are you?

Fly ash works and it probably would be free. You would just need to pay to have it hauled. I have used it to build a road and are planning on getting about 20 loads more soon.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:39:37 AM EST
You've had some great replies already. I'd highly recommend putting down a little fly ash or cement kiln dust (CKD) under your gravel. Wet the sand down and till in the CKD or fly ash. Then compact it the best that you can. Then put on your gravel or millings. The haul cost is pretty much what drives the prices of materials like this, and I'd figure about $0.25/mile/ton since the truck will deadhead back to the quarry.

Asphalt millings is the way to go if you can find them. Low dust, gnereally easy to compact and if the summer gets warm enough, the millings will stick together a little bit.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:43:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By Colby:
You've had some great replies already. I'd highly recommend putting down a little fly ash or cement kiln dust (CKD) under your gravel. Wet the sand down and till in the CKD or fly ash. Then compact it the best that you can. Then put on your gravel or millings. The haul cost is pretty much what drives the prices of materials like this, and I'd figure about $0.25/mile/ton since the truck will deadhead back to the quarry.

Asphalt millings is the way to go if you can find them. Low dust, gnereally easy to compact and if the summer gets warm enough, the millings will stick together a little bit.


Agreed.

Around here limestone is only a few dollars per ton, its the trucking that really gets you. If you can possibly haul it yourself (borrow a friends dump truck etc) you'll save a lot of money.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 2:46:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 2:47:16 AM EST by shibumiseeker]
A 20 ton triaxle dump truck runs me around $200 delivered. Doesn't matter size of grade.
Crushed limestone around here is size rated (I don't know how this translates into other areas).

2 or 4 is good base material for roads, pieces are good sized "throwing rocks" (golf ball sized,
a little bigger). 7s are smaller (size of a quarter or so, I use this when I mix concrete and as a top
layer for my road) and 53s are mixed size with lots of dust. The dust helps "pack" the road and is
useful if you are going to have the road rolled. You can get near asphalt smoothness with
53s as the finishing layer if you roll it.

Rip-rap is larger pieces good for lining slopes, ditches, stream banks, etc. They are the size of
softball to soccer ball.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:50:44 AM EST
I just did a driveway with #57 stone (typical driveway gravel, white limestone 3/4"ish). Cost was $19/ton delivered about 22 miles from the quarry. Crushed stone base was the same (the crushed lime acts like clay when wet, locks the rock together). Took 43 tons (two trucks) to do about 2900 ft/sq. at 4" deep.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:05:43 AM EST
Best buy. and most practical for me is known as "DIRTY TWO'S". Holds up well !
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:14:17 AM EST
Thanks for all the replies. Looks like I have several options and looks like getting it there is where I will have to worry about the expense. Thank you.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:18:08 AM EST
Originally Posted By Mal_means_bad:
I just did a driveway with #57 stone (typical driveway gravel, white limestone 3/4"ish). Cost was $19/ton delivered about 22 miles from the quarry. Crushed stone base was the same (the crushed lime acts like clay when wet, locks the rock together). Took 43 tons (two trucks) to do about 2900 ft/sq. at 4" deep.


#57 is 1 1/2" Nominal Maximum and depending on the quality of the limestone, can have anywhere from 5% to 12% passing the #200 seive. You want plenty of fines for the reason stated above. 1 1/2 crusher run isn't seived as much and is typically a littler "dirtier" (more fines), and is usually cheaper. I am only familiar with some of the quarries in Oklahoma and a few in Kansas. Texas limestone tends to not be quite as durable is the stuff we have here and will weather a bit more rapidly.

I wouldn't buy anything smaller than a #57, and might go with 1 1/2" crusher run depending on the material.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:42:00 AM EST
Around here (Bonham, Sherman area)

gray rock - 250 for 9 yards (this is very good stuff)
white cliche - 150 for 9 yards
gravel (sand and sand gravel mixed) - 250 for 13 yards (not as good as gray rock but better than white cliche)

9 yards will cover about 150 feet at 2 inches
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:56:45 AM EST
Use the base layer felt available at most concrete companies. This alone will make your driveway last much much longer. It will keep it from sinking and creeping.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:36:06 AM EST
I am figuring you already did some reading on how to make a road/driveway since you are at this stage. I would learn what tends to work well in your area and go from there.

When I was in ohio my neighbor and I had some work done to create a couple ponds and raise our driveway up at the same time. We used the larger size stuff for a while and let the cars pack it in. As long as the ground was dry I had the dump truck tailgate it down, he just opens the tail gate a bit and drives along dumping the load as he goes. Saves the cost of spreading it out.

I lived out there so it got driven on every day and as time went on we had more loads brought in and towards the end we were using smaller stuff because we had a lot of the larger stuff packed in well.

I did not research how to do it back then. I relied on what some neighbors and the local dump truck driver recomended and it worked ok but if I had done some research it probably would have worked out better.

One thing about using larger pieces is everyone tends to drive slower. That can help a long gravel driveway last a while if you have visitors or neighbors who drive a bit fast on the gravel.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 8:47:17 AM EST
Crushed granite works well also.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 8:50:10 AM EST
Come and have all of mine for free if you want!
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 10:09:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 10:10:37 AM EST by Preppernation]
Thanks tayous1,

Now you tell us... LOL

Prepper
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 10:25:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By tayous1:
Come and have all of mine for free if you want!


better be careful, I can scare up a trailer pretty easy :D
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 10:44:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By biere:
I had the dump truck tailgate it down, he just opens the tail gate a bit and drives along dumping the load as he goes. Saves the cost of spreading it out.

.


This^^, must ask ahead of time to be sure truck has chains to adjust the gate opening, works great.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 10:47:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By coconut1:
Originally Posted By tayous1:
Come and have all of mine for free if you want!


better be careful, I can scare up a trailer pretty easy :D


The last people who owned my place set all these little brown rocks out and they get on the drive way and all over the place I hate them.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:12:10 PM EST
I pay about $240 for a 16 yd (tandem axle) dump truck of gravel, a little less for crusher run which is ungraded (but packs really nice). If I wanted limestone it would have to come from a hundred miles away.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 3:47:04 AM EST
Whatever is local to you is best.
Remember for a driveway/road base you want angular rock, not round rock.
Angular rock will pack together and stick together.

DO NOT USE crushed concrete. It NEVER stops being dusty. (sucks)

recycled asphalt is ok, although if put you a lot of it down it will stink (just like asphalt)

If you are in Texas, it's probably crushed limestone that you want but ask the rock yard, they'll know best.

$10 to $20 per ton delivered I'd bet.

You're going to need a lot. 15 tons of anything goes about 50 feet.

If you can get a semi/end dump in, it will cut your cost considerably. (fewer loads)
figure out how much you need and then call. If you need a lot you'll get a much better price.

Link Posted: 9/18/2009 7:55:09 AM EST
Thanks everyone. I am going to go ahead and measure out what I have 1 more time and make some calls once my work week is over. I have 2 roads lead into and on the property. 1 is improved and the other is just sand, so I am interested making the sand road improved also, so I think regardless, I am going to just got with a full semi load unless I just can't afford it.

Thank you for all the replies and advice.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 2:33:17 PM EST
one semi load?
that's about 25 tons

it will totally disappear.

You need hundreds of tons of rock.

Link Posted: 9/18/2009 11:04:37 PM EST
all in time. I think the bank and the wife are only going to allow 1 load at a time, especially since the truck is 4x4 and I haven't been stuck out there yet :D
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