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Posted: 10/26/2010 5:54:17 AM EDT
I've asked this once before, probably in archives by now, but I have an augment to it. My original question was how to smoke pork ribs and with a rub. Well, those ribs almost started WWIII in my dinning room over one rack. This weekend my little girl decided she wanted me to do ribs again.. this time with a lesson learned. I did only one rack last time with a brown sugar based rub. Let it set overnight then smoked it for 4 hours at 125-140 with hickory then some apple at the last 30min. This time I'm doin two racks, same rub and wood. The question is this: Do I smoke them both at 4 hours still or since there will be two, will it take me 8 hours at 125-140?
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:04:18 AM EDT
I'm pretty sure you will not double your time requirements when adding one rack even though you're doubling the mass. Having said that, if you were going from 50 to 100 (also doubling the amount of meat), I'm sure it would drastically change things.

I've done several racks at a time on a relatively small smoker (just big enough for 3 racks of pork ribs) using about the same amount of time. I don't really go for a specific time, just 'til it's done.

One note that is probably not an issue (I would have to check the book), but it seems like your temp may be a little low for pork. Again, I'm not sure, just thinking.

Good luck!

sgt_seti
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:58:04 AM EDT
225-250 is a general guideline for smoking temps.
Some folks also say that you don't need to have smoke the entire time since most of the smoke flavor is absorbed in the beginning.  Augmenting with different woods sounds cool but you may be working harder than the actual payoff.
However, if it's so tasty that fights break out, then I wouldn't be listening to anyone here and keep doing what you're doing.
I also agree with not having to double the cook time.  Racks are small enough and doing 1 or 2 isn't going to bust the heat that much.

Link Posted: 10/26/2010 8:24:50 AM EDT
Thanks guys for the replies. Ya I was almost impaled with a salad fork last time I did them when it got down to the last two rib bones I plan to keep it all the same, I think I may have made a continual slip with the 1 on the temp, my bad. Thanks for the help!
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 12:11:44 PM EDT
The meat will only absorb smoke flavor until it hits a temperature internally of 160*
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:14:38 PM EDT
Now I got a new question. Im gonna get to smoke a turkey for Thanksgiving, what is a good wood combo for smoking it? Ive seen pecan, hickory and cherry pop up with my google fu. This sound right?
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:26:46 PM EDT
I've used apple wood with good results.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:30:13 PM EDT
The one turkey I smoked was on hickory. My wife baked one in the oven the same day for the large family gathering. The smoked bird quickly became a small pile of bones. The oven-baked bird lasted a few days. She told me that she's not going to bother baking another whenever we host the family gathering. I would plan for a bit longer on that task than for the ribs. I fried a turkey for the gathering one year. I didn't plan for enough cooktime on it. That was not a pretty sight.

sgt_seti
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 9:35:10 PM EDT
mmmmm ribs.
makes my face messy just thinking about it......
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 9:36:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 9:44:31 PM EDT by troy808]
for thanksgiving (or whenever)
we bury turkeys, ham, yams, breadfruit, etc in the ground, best in the sand.

rub turkey with sea salt, or seasoning of choice
set turkey in foil pan, wrap in foil,  then chicken wire to maintain integrity
make fire with Keawe (mesquite) firewood with a pile of (porous) river rocks (so they don't explode)
when rocks are red/white, layer cut banana stumps over rocks
place turkey, pork, etc  on the stumps. the stumps are loaded with water, and will produce much steam.
cover food items and layer with ti and banana leaves
cover with wet burlap or canvass, then covered w/ sand, ensuring that no smoke or steam escapes.

watch football
then uncover.
bones pull right out
goes good with poi
(eta) and beer
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 4:53:39 AM EDT
Originally Posted By troy808:
for thanksgiving (or whenever)
we bury turkeys, ham, yams, breadfruit, etc in the ground, best in the sand.

rub turkey with sea salt, or seasoning of choice
set turkey in foil pan, wrap in foil,  then chicken wire to maintain integrity
make fire with Keawe (mesquite) firewood with a pile of (porous) river rocks (so they don't explode)
when rocks are red/white, layer cut banana stumps over rocks
place turkey, pork, etc  on the stumps. the stumps are loaded with water, and will produce much steam.
cover food items and layer with ti and banana leaves
cover with wet burlap or canvass, then covered w/ sand, ensuring that no smoke or steam escapes.

watch football
then uncover.
bones pull right out
goes good with poi
(eta) and beer


Is this supposed to be a caveman/Hawaiian recipe? with the burying and banana stuff
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 6:28:45 AM EDT
I've used Apple with good results.
Sat in a brine overnight versus dry rub.
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 8:37:13 AM EDT
with smoking once you get your temp set it will stay there generally no matter how much meat you put on it
unless your blocking the flow entirely.
just be careful if one side has a higher temperature.
you think you had a fight over some pork
just wait till you get that turkey done right.
the gloves will come off in that free for all
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 11:35:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By LARman0311:
Originally Posted By troy808:
for thanksgiving (or whenever)
we bury turkeys, ham, yams, breadfruit, etc in the ground, best in the sand.

rub turkey with sea salt, or seasoning of choice
set turkey in foil pan, wrap in foil,  then chicken wire to maintain integrity
make fire with Keawe (mesquite) firewood with a pile of (porous) river rocks (so they don't explode)
when rocks are red/white, layer cut banana stumps over rocks
place turkey, pork, etc  on the stumps. the stumps are loaded with water, and will produce much steam.
cover food items and layer with ti and banana leaves
cover with wet burlap or canvass, then covered w/ sand, ensuring that no smoke or steam escapes.

watch football
then uncover.
bones pull right out
goes good with poi
(eta) and beer


Is this supposed to be a caveman/Hawaiian recipe? with the burying and banana stuff

yeah, that's how the ancients used to do it, and still do for luaus. they usually use pigs instead.
thanksgiving day, we are out there at 0400 to burn down the neighborhood. about 0700, the rocks are ready, and we take the chow out about 1500.
the banana stumps prevent drying, the ti leaves add flavor.
not really a smoker method, but is usually error free.
fire - fire - fire - heh - heh - heh - heh
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 11:37:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Eyespeck:
I've used Apple with good results.
Sat in a brine overnight versus dry rub.

actually, did this last year, and I was impressed.
thanks for the reminder
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 10:16:37 PM EDT
Last turkey I smoked was with pecan wood. Kept a pan of apple juice in the smoker, though, close to the heat source.
Link Posted: 10/29/2010 11:48:56 AM EDT
I smoked about 9 turkeys last year and did a brine and rub mix. The brine I used was a few cans of RC cola as it makes the meat tender. Now if you like the skin on your turkey rub some oil on it first as the oil keeps the skin from drying out and does not give the skin that ash tray taste to it. I only use Mesquite when I smoke IMHO I think it is the best. The rub I used was garlic powder a long with a Mesquite steak rub I found. Best thing to do id buy a few birds or breast meat and smoke them before the big day then if you screw up it really does not matter.
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