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Posted: 12/8/2013 7:16:06 PM EST
I am ready to start backpacking in the spring and am wondering what you all recommend for pocket survival kits. Whether it is a pre-packaged kit or a list to set up yourself, what do you recommend?
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 8:02:40 PM EST
two knifes, basic fishing supplies, at least 20,000 calories of some type of survival bars, some type of water purification , fire starter, first-aid kit, 100' 550 cord, 2-3 emergency blankets, the ones that orange on one side, some type of cooking pot, poncho, and make sure you tell more than one person. where your going and when your going to be back.
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 8:33:00 PM EST
Some ideas,

Compact emergency food that doesn't require cooking like a package of lifeboat rations or something. Beyond what you're planning on actually consuming.

Backup water purification, tiny bottle of tablets.

Trash bags and lightweight bright plastic tarp or signaling panel. If you get the ground sheet of your tent in orange, double duty.

Emergency beacon (last resort) if you are out of cell range. This is more important if you're going solo.

Gorilla tape.

Small diameter nylon string or cord.

Everything else you need you should probably already have with you as a matter of course anyway.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 12:23:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 5:56:43 AM EST by hero2three]
I'm in the same boat. I'm in the process of building a small survival pouch that will help in the event our helicopter goes down. Assuming its precautionary and we don't plummet to the ground in a big ball of fire. I have to put everything in this pouch. I wear about 50ft(guessing) para cord bracelet. All medical supplies are already on the aircraft.


Edit to add the word "Don't"
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 4:35:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/10/2013 5:53:01 PM EST by livinfree]
Whatever gear you decide to carry, check out m4040.com

Quality gear for a very affordable price and some great information just in case you need it.

EDIT: Is it OK to post a website on here?
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 6:01:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/10/2013 6:02:31 PM EST by raimius]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By katrina24:
two knifes, basic fishing supplies, at least 20,000 calories of some type of survival bars, some type of water purification , fire starter, first-aid kit, 100' 550 cord, 2-3 emergency blankets, the ones that orange on one side, some type of cooking pot, poncho, and make sure you tell more than one person. where your going and when your going to be back.
View Quote

You, sir, must have some VERY large pockets!

To the OP, are you looking for "survival gear I can put in my pockets" or "a pouch of survival gear I can fit in a pocket?"
Just remember:
Shelter
FIre
Water
Food
Signaling

If you can cover those areas, you should be good. Personally, I made a bail out kit when I was in flight school. It was a small pelican case that fit in my pocket. I had some aluminum foil (signal/water), storm proof matches (25), Victorinox Tinker knife, a zip-lock bag, emergency tinder (8), signal mirror, and one of those credit-card tools with a knife, ferro-rod, LED light, and whistle. Admittedly, shelter was skimped on, but I always dressed for the occasion. A small water bottle went in my other leg pocket.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 6:25:35 PM EST
wilderness survival kit....




Never venture into the wild without enough pharmaceuticals to get you to the other side.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 6:21:44 AM EST
For an off the shelf pocket survival kit, Doug Ritter's POCKET SURVIVAL PAK is a pretty good place to start: Pocket Survival Pak.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 2:46:51 PM EST
these gerber- bear grylls are nice for a starter and can be had on sale for $30.
http://www.walmart.com/ip/GERBER-31-000701-Bear-Grylls-Survival-Series-Ultimate-Kit/27705041
i picked one up for a first time camper (teen) to get them started.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 6:05:59 AM EST
I have noticed on this site that most giving advice on stuff for backpacking are not backpackers. Though well intentioned, the advice is usually off, in my experience.

First, you really don't "need" a pocket survival kit. Most stuff in tiny kits is pretty worthless. What you need is proper gear in the first place. Big three being a properly fitted pack, a tent that is appropriate and a bag that is appropriate. For summer/mild weather BPing, I try to keep my tent under 5#s. If it says two man tent, its good for one. 3 man tents are usually sized right for 2, etc. A high quality sleeping bag and ground pad are critical items. If you are miserable all night, it makes the trip suck.

A few things that are very nice/smart to have:
Flip flops, for at camp or when you reach your destination. If you plan on doing long treks, being able to let your primary footwear air out is a good idea and the flip flops will feel great/give your feet a break.
Quality socks. Just spend the $. Trust me.
Moleskin. If your feet are screwed up with blisters, you are going to be miserable.
I wear ASOLO boots.
You don't need a Rambo knife. A little gerber LST, or The new version of the army issued Swiss Army Knife is fine. Inexperienced guys always want to advise a big assed fixed blade that is completely unnecessary, and adds un-needed weight.
Two ways to make fire. Matches in a plastic baggie with some extra TP, and a bic lighter will do fine. I am redundant in this area, as I carry a little fire steel with me, "just in case".
A headlamp. You don't need 3 flashlights. One quality headlamp is fine.


Water purifier goes without saying.
GoreTex shell should go without saying.
Check out the latest "Halulite" cook wear. Light as titanium without the titanium price. I just picked up a tea kettle and it is a killer piece of kit.
Nalgene bottles are nice, and you can store stuff inside. That being said, many of the 1 liter plastic sweet tea bottles have good tight caps, weigh substantially less, and only cost a buck or two from the store (tea included ;) ). I wrap a couple wraps of duct tape around mine for whatever I need to repair.
The bottom line is you need to know where to scrimp and where not to.
Skip the "pocket survival kits" and just get proper gear in the first place.
Ounces =pounds, pounds = pain.
Go lighter, go further.


Link Posted: 12/12/2013 2:00:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lost_River:
I have noticed on this site that most giving advice on stuff for backpacking are not backpackers. Though well intentioned, the advice is usually off, in my experience.

First, you really don't "need" a pocket survival kit. Most stuff in tiny kits is pretty worthless. What you need is proper gear in the first place. Big three being a properly fitted pack, a tent that is appropriate and a bag that is appropriate. For summer/mild weather BPing, I try to keep my tent under 5#s. If it says two man tent, its good for one. 3 man tents are usually sized right for 2, etc. A high quality sleeping bag and ground pad are critical items. If you are miserable all night, it makes the trip suck.

A few things that are very nice/smart to have:
Flip flops, for at camp or when you reach your destination. If you plan on doing long treks, being able to let your primary footwear air out is a good idea and the flip flops will feel great/give your feet a break.
Quality socks. Just spend the $. Trust me.
Moleskin. If your feet are screwed up with blisters, you are going to be miserable.
I wear ASOLO boots.
You don't need a Rambo knife. A little gerber LST, or The new version of the army issued Swiss Army Knife is fine. Inexperienced guys always want to advise a big assed fixed blade that is completely unnecessary, and adds un-needed weight.
Two ways to make fire. Matches in a plastic baggie with some extra TP, and a bic lighter will do fine. I am redundant in this area, as I carry a little fire steel with me, "just in case".
A headlamp. You don't need 3 flashlights. One quality headlamp is fine.


Water purifier goes without saying.
GoreTex shell should go without saying.
Check out the latest "Halulite" cook wear. Light as titanium without the titanium price. I just picked up a tea kettle and it is a killer piece of kit.
Nalgene bottles are nice, and you can store stuff inside. That being said, many of the 1 liter plastic sweet tea bottles have good tight caps, weigh substantially less, and only cost a buck or two from the store (tea included ;) ). I wrap a couple wraps of duct tape around mine for whatever I need to repair.
The bottom line is you need to know where to scrimp and where not to.
Skip the "pocket survival kits" and just get proper gear in the first place.
Ounces =pounds, pounds = pain.
Go lighter, go further.


View Quote

Good primary gear is important, agreed.
I think most people view the "pocket kits" as something to use if they get separated from or can't take their primary gear. I have stuff to go camping in my car, but certain things stay in my pocket, as much as possible.

In the end, it's about comfort and risk management. I can be comfy and lower my risk by taking lightweight, quality gear. I could be comfy and higher risk by leaving some gear at home. I could split the difference, and only take some "essential" gear. Your gear should always reflect your plans and capabilities.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:37:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lost_River:
I have noticed on this site that most giving advice on stuff for backpacking are not backpackers. Though well intentioned, the advice is usually off, in my experience.

First, you really don't "need" a pocket survival kit. Most stuff in tiny kits is pretty worthless. What you need is proper gear in the first place. Big three being a properly fitted pack, a tent that is appropriate and a bag that is appropriate. For summer/mild weather BPing, I try to keep my tent under 5#s. If it says two man tent, its good for one. 3 man tents are usually sized right for 2, etc. A high quality sleeping bag and ground pad are critical items. If you are miserable all night, it makes the trip suck.

A few things that are very nice/smart to have:
Flip flops, for at camp or when you reach your destination. If you plan on doing long treks, being able to let your primary footwear air out is a good idea and the flip flops will feel great/give your feet a break.
Quality socks. Just spend the $. Trust me.
Moleskin. If your feet are screwed up with blisters, you are going to be miserable.
I wear ASOLO boots.
You don't need a Rambo knife. A little gerber LST, or The new version of the army issued Swiss Army Knife is fine. Inexperienced guys always want to advise a big assed fixed blade that is completely unnecessary, and adds un-needed weight.
Two ways to make fire. Matches in a plastic baggie with some extra TP, and a bic lighter will do fine. I am redundant in this area, as I carry a little fire steel with me, "just in case".
A headlamp. You don't need 3 flashlights. One quality headlamp is fine.


Water purifier goes without saying.
GoreTex shell should go without saying.
Check out the latest "Halulite" cook wear. Light as titanium without the titanium price. I just picked up a tea kettle and it is a killer piece of kit.
Nalgene bottles are nice, and you can store stuff inside. That being said, many of the 1 liter plastic sweet tea bottles have good tight caps, weigh substantially less, and only cost a buck or two from the store (tea included ;) ). I wrap a couple wraps of duct tape around mine for whatever I need to repair.
The bottom line is you need to know where to scrimp and where not to.
Skip the "pocket survival kits" and just get proper gear in the first place.
Ounces =pounds, pounds = pain.
Go lighter, go further.


View Quote


I don't back pack and can in no way carry that much gear, or have the need for it. I NEED a small lightweight pouch that contains certain gear that can get me through a cold night if my aircraft goes down in a remote area.
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