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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/3/2007 11:51:47 AM EST
Ok, I read here that the majority likes this unit and I bought one. I got an additional 2Gig chip. It looks like the factory map is pretty generic....Now what do I have to do???

I thought I would be able to download map info but it looks like I need to purchase a CD for $116.

I will use it mostly for hunting but like the idea of it a a secondary Road GPS.... Please help the GPS challanged and tell me what I need to do...

Thanks, Rob
Link Posted: 10/4/2007 7:30:20 AM EST
If you want to use the gps to do automatic routing, you need to purchase the maps to do this. This would allow you to have it give you directions to a location from where ever you are. I don't remember what these maps cost, but they make the gps really nice to use while driving.

If you want maps with trails on them or with topo maps, you need the topo version. I also have these but found that the maps are not as detailed as other maps.
Link Posted: 10/4/2007 5:02:43 PM EST
As mentioned, you need the CDs with maps to route or have more maps than the basic base map included with the unit. It is 100% "possible' to make your own maps, but downloading them is nearly impossible. The only way to download a map is for someone to have created their own and host it somewhere that you could find it. Pretty small odds-

Also, you may want to re-think the 2GB chip. The Garmin can handle the chip, but won't run very fast. The best be is to only load the topo/map data for the area of interest and leave the rest off. You can load 1/2 of the mountain west if you so desired, so the area of interest can be much larger than your specific hike or hunting area, just don't think you'll get optimum performance with the entire continent loaded.

If you decide to get topo maps, the average topo grom Garmin is 1;1,000,000 scale, or 90M resolution. OK for basic stuff, but not really good by most standards. They also sell National Parks Topo maps at 1:24,000 scale, MUCH better, but you have to be near a National Park to get coverage.

Again, it's possible to make your own from scratch and load them onto the GPS, but not very newb-friendly. For GPS newbs or GIS/Mapping newbs. Google searches can get you started if you really want to pursue it.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:42:00 AM EST
I was pleasantly surprised by the built in base map. On a recent hunt in WY the map showed just about all the little two-track trails I drove on. Some you could barely tell were even trails thru the sage.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 3:37:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By drizz:
I was pleasantly surprised by the built in base map. On a recent hunt in WY the map showed just about all the little two-track trails I drove on. Some you could barely tell were even trails thru the sage.
So the built in base map is a map of the whole country?
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 3:44:55 AM EST
Do you guys reccommend just getting the us road map or will it slow the unit down. And does it make mor sense to get the map on cd and down load it or just use the diskette???

Thanks for the help btw....

R
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 3:58:24 AM EST
It seems that in some areas it might be missing a gravel road here and there. And I'm sure it's outdated in some areas that have new construction, but for general travel. it's more than enough. For most of my uses, the mapping is just "fluff" anyway. If it wasn't for the increased speed of the 60, I'm more than happy with my old non-mapping Garmin 12 that I've had for years. But that's mainly for marking fishing spots, stand locations, and a few routes. These are all off-road where mapping is usually more clutter than help anyway. The 60 is a good unit and easy to operate.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 3:58:59 AM EST
If you can find someone who only has 1 unit activated with the maps $$, then you can work with them since garmin allows you to unlock 2 units for the price of 1 software package. Sorry my ex-girlfriend got mine
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