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9/23/2020 3:47:02 PM
Posted: 10/18/2015 5:26:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/19/2015 12:43:30 PM EDT
I've got 3 types of garlic that I'm putting the ground today.  I wanted to get the bases to root a little, so I put them I'm water with a little baking soda (fungi preventative) and let the sun warm them.    I'm putting them on deep side (4") just encase this triggers quick growth.  I suppose that's it
Link Posted: 10/21/2015 10:30:28 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
I've got 3 types of garlic that I'm putting the ground today.  I wanted to get the bases to root a little, so I put them I'm water with a little baking soda (fungi preventative) and let the sun warm them.    I'm putting them on deep side (4") just encase this triggers quick growth.  I suppose that's it
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My understanding is they will root as long as the soil temperature is above freezing.  I've actually had chickens dig up bulbs after planting in the fall and can confirm they will root well.  If the soil temperature is > 40F, they will send up a stock, maybe even at a lower temperature if it's a hardneck variety.  I've always been told to never soak garlic or onion bulbs in water as that has a greater change of promoting disease.
Link Posted: 10/23/2015 8:20:11 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By C-4:


My understanding is they will root as long as the soil temperature is above freezing.  I've actually had chickens dig up bulbs after planting in the fall and can confirm they will root well.  If the soil temperature is > 40F, they will send up a stock, maybe even at a lower temperature if it's a hardneck variety.  I've always been told to never soak garlic or onion bulbs in water as that has a greater change of promoting disease.
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Originally Posted By C-4:
Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
I've got 3 types of garlic that I'm putting the ground today.  I wanted to get the bases to root a little, so I put them I'm water with a little baking soda (fungi preventative) and let the sun warm them.    I'm putting them on deep side (4") just encase this triggers quick growth.  I suppose that's it


My understanding is they will root as long as the soil temperature is above freezing.  I've actually had chickens dig up bulbs after planting in the fall and can confirm they will root well.  If the soil temperature is > 40F, they will send up a stock, maybe even at a lower temperature if it's a hardneck variety.  I've always been told to never soak garlic or onion bulbs in water as that has a greater change of promoting disease.


I've read the caveats about soaking too much can promote rot.  I make sure only base gets wet and they get some sunshine (disinfectant) before burial.  I'm hardly an expert on this, we will see how they fair.
Link Posted: 10/23/2015 8:51:27 PM EDT
We are planting about 100 cloves this weekend.

Do you really need hay or can you use grass clippings?
Link Posted: 10/24/2015 11:56:29 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By mks99:
We are planting about 100 cloves this weekend.

Do you really need hay or can you use grass clippings?
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Straw, or hay will have more lignin structure to it, thus more rot resistant, but any can harbor mold/mildew if too damp and lacking air.  Grass in a good sunny location, not too thick and well drained should work.....so I think anyway
Link Posted: 10/24/2015 12:44:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:


I've read the caveats about soaking too much can promote rot.  I make sure only base gets wet and they get some sunshine (disinfectant) before burial.  I'm hardly an expert on this, we will see how they fair.
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Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
Originally Posted By C-4:
Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
I've got 3 types of garlic that I'm putting the ground today.  I wanted to get the bases to root a little, so I put them I'm water with a little baking soda (fungi preventative) and let the sun warm them.    I'm putting them on deep side (4") just encase this triggers quick growth.  I suppose that's it


My understanding is they will root as long as the soil temperature is above freezing.  I've actually had chickens dig up bulbs after planting in the fall and can confirm they will root well.  If the soil temperature is > 40F, they will send up a stock, maybe even at a lower temperature if it's a hardneck variety.  I've always been told to never soak garlic or onion bulbs in water as that has a greater change of promoting disease.


I've read the caveats about soaking too much can promote rot.  I make sure only base gets wet and they get some sunshine (disinfectant) before burial.  I'm hardly an expert on this, we will see how they fair.


I've done it before with onion plants.  You see those bone dry roots and can't help but want to soak them so they hydrate.
Link Posted: 10/24/2015 1:50:39 PM EDT
Just leave it alone.

It will come up in the spring.
Link Posted: 10/26/2015 4:26:54 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
Straw, or hay will have more lignin structure to it, thus more rot resistant, but any can harbor mold/mildew if too damp and lacking air.  Grass in a good sunny location, not too thick and well drained should work.....so I think anyway

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Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:



Originally Posted By mks99:

We are planting about 100 cloves this weekend.



Do you really need hay or can you use grass clippings?




Straw, or hay will have more lignin structure to it, thus more rot resistant, but any can harbor mold/mildew if too damp and lacking air.  Grass in a good sunny location, not too thick and well drained should work.....so I think anyway





 
Is there a garlic for idiots thread somewhere for a complete garlic nube?  
Link Posted: 10/26/2015 8:15:20 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By kallnojoy:

  Is there a garlic for idiots thread somewhere for a complete garlic nube?  
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Originally Posted By kallnojoy:
Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
Originally Posted By mks99:
We are planting about 100 cloves this weekend.

Do you really need hay or can you use grass clippings?


Straw, or hay will have more lignin structure to it, thus more rot resistant, but any can harbor mold/mildew if too damp and lacking air.  Grass in a good sunny location, not too thick and well drained should work.....so I think anyway

  Is there a garlic for idiots thread somewhere for a complete garlic nube?  



I only have one year behind my belt, but a few here have more experience. I'd say this as good as it gets, let's learn as we go.  I already learned a few things.  If you choose to soak, peel the husk away.  Continuous moisture is bad.  So is an alkaline soil.  That said, my soaked garlic is substantially further along, the ones I didn't drown anyway.   I'm trying a few hardneck varieties they are hardier so long as you have a real winter.
Link Posted: 10/30/2015 2:02:41 AM EDT
The important thing is to start, good work OP.
Link Posted: 10/30/2015 11:01:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2015 11:02:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/31/2015 8:10:12 PM EDT
Cut ours in half this year to only 100 cloves, 50 soft neck and 50 hardneck. Got them in the planter box last weekend. I've been using pine needles for cover, no rot and general don't pack too tight.
Link Posted: 11/5/2015 3:36:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 8:15:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/6/2015 8:16:16 AM EDT by Panta_Rei]
I've seen a lot of variation for planting depth suggested.  Mulching or lack therefore certainly is a factor as well as your climate.  Experienced growers, what is the optimal depth for your patch?
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 9:19:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 4:08:56 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By jnk556:


Got a bale of hay for free this morning, so I guess the garilc will be happy.  I just wish the local stray cat would quit shitting in  my garlic patch
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Thanks for the laugh.  I needed that



 
Link Posted: 11/6/2015 7:23:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/8/2015 6:07:44 PM EDT
So I was in the grocery store last night and saw a bag of organic whole cloves on sale and I remembered this thread...



Today I cleared out one of my 4x8' raised beds I had tomatoes in, mixed in some fairly composted chick brooder bedding, planted 1/2 the bed with the garlic cloves and mulched with a few inches of old hay.




May be a total failure, but at least it inspired me enough to clean out a bed today!  
Link Posted: 11/8/2015 8:00:24 PM EDT
Most of mine have poked up out of the ground, looks like about 100%. I plant the bottom at 2" deep and then put about an inch (after getting wet and settling down) of pine needles on top. They poke right out of the needles and the needles don't rot and compact.
Link Posted: 11/12/2015 11:29:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/12/2015 11:34:50 AM EDT by jnk556]
Link Posted: 11/16/2015 2:34:50 PM EDT
Finally got all of my Garlic planted. Hope it's not too late. Most was from the garden but I ordered some new varieties to try. I have 6 rows that are 40 feet long
Varieties planted: German Extra Hardy, German Red, Georgian Fire, Russian Red, Oregon Blue and some unknown variety from my neighbor.
Link Posted: 12/18/2015 10:41:19 AM EDT
We've been having a very warm winter.  I planted most of my garlic in late Oct thru mid Nov.  Some garlic is 4-6 " tall already.  Very likely the cold will come late.  Is this too much growth for potentially sub zero temps?  Mulch before the onset of cold? Other tips to prevent freeze back?
Link Posted: 12/30/2015 8:43:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 6:40:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 6:52:40 PM EDT
Mine's coming back up with the warm weather we've had.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 3:10:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 7:45:44 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Waldo:


 One year I planted too early and had some sprout up about 3-4 inches. The tops got a little frost burned and kind of goofy looking, but they grew come spring.

I'm not really sure covering the tops with a heavy mulch is really a good thing at that point though.  
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Originally Posted By Waldo:
Originally Posted By Panta_Rei:
We've been having a very warm winter.  I planted most of my garlic in late Oct thru mid Nov.  Some garlic is 4-6 " tall already.  Very likely the cold will come late.  Is this too much growth for potentially sub zero temps?  Mulch before the onset of cold? Other tips to prevent freeze back?


 One year I planted too early and had some sprout up about 3-4 inches. The tops got a little frost burned and kind of goofy looking, but they grew come spring.

I'm not really sure covering the tops with a heavy mulch is really a good thing at that point though.  


Was gonna ask the same ("How much winter growth is too much?") question... my test bed as of today:

Link Posted: 1/2/2016 10:53:28 PM EDT
I plant mine 3-4" deep and haven't ever mulched. What comes up in the fall usually freezes off but it comes back up in the early spring.
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