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Posted: 8/31/2013 1:17:59 PM EDT
I'm looking at the pictured piece of property.  It is 40 acres with a pond on it.  It's in Western Washington.  I believe that there's at least some water in the pond all year long.
Was thinking of putting a house in the Northeast or Southeast, as that's where the road is.  Then trying to increase the water level in the pond and try stocking it with fish.  Then trying for a garden just to the East of the pond.  There's a hill in the middle of the property that should make a good backstop for my future rifle range as well.

There are additional 40 acre parcels to the north, south, and east, and logging company lands to the west.

Any thoughts?



Link Posted: 8/31/2013 1:35:36 PM EDT
Things I look at with property;

1) Do you own mineral and timber rights?

2) Cost to put power in?

3) Cost to put water & sewer or septic in?

4) Any restrictions?

5) What does the surrounding area look like, going to be shopping malls or highways in the near future?
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 1:45:41 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Things I look at with property;

1) Do you own mineral and timber rights?
no clue, will look into it
2) Cost to put power in?
Shouldn't be too bad.  Existing power is only a couple hundred feet away.
3) Cost to put water & sewer or septic in?
Shouldn't be too unreasonable.  There are other houses in the general area.
4) Any restrictions?
None that I'm aware of.  No easements at least
5) What does the surrounding area look like, going to be shopping malls or highways in the near future?
View Quote

Mostly timberland, and large chunks of land.  Don't see any big population growth in the area any time in the forseeable future.
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 2:17:19 PM EDT
Owning the mineral rights and timber rights are very important IMO. I realize some states dont allow you to own them, WVa being one of them, which is why id never own land there.
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 2:25:07 PM EDT
You'll never get a house on the NE corner; that's where the pond heads up and it'll be a swamp.  SE corner looks to be the best place.

'Pond" is in rough shape.  Bet there's a whole clan of beavers living there.  Probably got weeds/algae/lily pads out the ass.

ETA:  looks to be pretty much cutover, with youngish natural regeneration.
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 2:26:55 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Owning the mineral rights and timber rights are very important IMO. I realize some states dont allow you to own them, WVa being one of them, which is why id never own land there.
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??? Are you saying that it's statutorily illegal to own timber and mineral rights in WV?  I find that odd, as many of our clients in WV are, in fact, in the timber and mining business, and cut wood, dig coal, and pump gas all day long.  Guess they're just stealing it, huh?
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 2:35:13 PM EDT
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Quoted:



??? Are you saying that it's statutorily illegal to own timber and mineral rights in WV?  I find that odd, as many of our clients in WV are, in fact, in the timber and mining business, and cut wood, dig coal, and pump gas all day long.  Guess they're just stealing it, huh?
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Owning the mineral rights and timber rights are very important IMO. I realize some states dont allow you to own them, WVa being one of them, which is why id never own land there.



??? Are you saying that it's statutorily illegal to own timber and mineral rights in WV?  I find that odd, as many of our clients in WV are, in fact, in the timber and mining business, and cut wood, dig coal, and pump gas all day long.  Guess they're just stealing it, huh?


just going by what Ive been told, if Its wrong so be it. I was born and raised in WV, when I asked my dad about Mineral rights, he said that he didnt own them, so maybe it was just that development we lived in.
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 2:39:49 PM EDT
There will be easements for those 2 roads
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 3:35:56 PM EDT
does the pond have fish
Link Posted: 8/31/2013 4:41:34 PM EDT
Meet your neighbors before you buy.

Boundry deletion on your title insurance. This will insure the TI covers what's on your survey and not just the title ownership.

Research local area and find out what's planned (industry, mining, construction etc.).

Hire a real estate attorney. Don't waste time or money with real estate agents.  Lawyer  will know local codes and laws and will add some things to your contract that could save you a bundle in the future.

Make very certain you have free and clear access to the property.  Most of the time title insurance does not cover access.
Link Posted: 9/1/2013 3:21:50 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Things I look at with property;

1) Do you own mineral and timber rights?

2) Cost to put power in?

3) Cost to put water & sewer or septic in?

4) Any restrictions?

5) What does the surrounding area look like, going to be shopping malls or highways in the near future?
View Quote




plus 1 on utilities. i got a good deal on my land. unfortunately utilities will need to be run a mile. and cost $20-$30.000 all underground.

i am lucky i have a nat gas well though. drill a well, for $10k or so, i am considering off grid living.  outside wood burner, for hot water and furnace heat. ( free firewood)
possibly a nat gas furnace. nat gas stoves, hot water heater, with a partial solar set up, and powered by a nat gas generator.

i could probably buy all nat gas appliances, and a outside wood burner, and a nat gas genny, and run 2000' of gas line, for what it would cost to run the water and utility electric underground. cost might even be equal, but then id have multiple free energy options.
Link Posted: 9/1/2013 6:48:49 AM EDT
Where is the access if you are surrounded by other people's and?
Link Posted: 9/1/2013 10:26:12 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Meet your neighbors before you buy.



Boundry deletion on your title insurance. This will insure the TI covers what's on your survey and not just the title ownership.



Research local area and find out what's planned (industry, mining, construction etc.).



Hire a real estate attorney. Don't waste time or money with real estate agents.  Lawyer  will know local codes and laws and will add some things to your contract that could save you a bundle in the future.



Make very certain you have free and clear access to the property.  Most of the time title insurance does not cover access.
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The boundary delineation idea is excellent, that one gets added to my lists! Thanks!



 
Link Posted: 9/1/2013 7:47:30 PM EDT
It's actually called a "deletion" in Texas.  Google it.
Link Posted: 9/1/2013 8:28:55 PM EDT
Well, I wandered out to it today and got some pictures.  I also got a copy of the survey with easements.  It appears that the only easement is the northeast corner where the road goes...So that's pretty cool.  Have a message in to the real estate agent selling it asking for more questions.  If I get serious, I'll get a lawyer to deal with it.

This is the beaver pond.  There's a startling amount of water in it, considering we've only had about an inch of rain in the last 3 months or so, and it's been very warm.

This is what the roads look like through the property.  The picture I first showed you is quite old apparently.

This is standing directly west in the clear cut looking back at the property.  The beaver pond is directly behind those trees.
Link Posted: 9/2/2013 4:03:08 AM EDT
Very nice piece of land, id be all over that if it was on the east coast.
Link Posted: 9/2/2013 4:28:10 AM EDT
There are easements for those other roads surveyed or not.  They are clearly being used occasionally.
Link Posted: 9/2/2013 10:55:54 PM EDT
Quoted:
I'm looking at the pictured piece of property.  It is 40 acres with a pond on it.  It's in Western Washington.  I believe that there's at least some water in the pond all year long.
Was thinking of putting a house in the Northeast or Southeast, as that's where the road is.  Then trying to increase the water level in the pond and try stocking it with fish.  Then trying for a garden just to the East of the pond.  There's a hill in the middle of the property that should make a good backstop for my future rifle range as well.

There are additional 40 acre parcels to the north, south, and east, and logging company lands to the west.

Any thoughts?

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll30/Lokjell/Misc/40-acres_zps36b990a4.jpg

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Where at in western washington if i may ask.
Link Posted: 9/2/2013 11:02:49 PM EDT
Trying not to get off the subject but individuals can own all or portions on the estates (oil, gas, coal or timber) in West Virginia as you pay the taxes.
Go buy land there!  Like the land from the Op.
Link Posted: 9/3/2013 4:07:26 AM EDT
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Quoted:


just going by what Ive been told, if Its wrong so be it. I was born and raised in WV, when I asked my dad about Mineral rights, he said that he didnt own them, so maybe it was just that development we lived in.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Owning the mineral rights and timber rights are very important IMO. I realize some states dont allow you to own them, WVa being one of them, which is why id never own land there.



??? Are you saying that it's statutorily illegal to own timber and mineral rights in WV?  I find that odd, as many of our clients in WV are, in fact, in the timber and mining business, and cut wood, dig coal, and pump gas all day long.  Guess they're just stealing it, huh?


just going by what Ive been told, if Its wrong so be it. I was born and raised in WV, when I asked my dad about Mineral rights, he said that he didnt own them, so maybe it was just that development we lived in.


Here in WV, most of the mineral and timber rights were sold off years ago, mainly because families were poor back in the day and needed the money. Over time, larger companies came in and started buying up larger chunks of land until most property here doesnt come with timber or mineral rights.

You can still find land though with timber and mineral rights but it will cost you.
Link Posted: 9/3/2013 5:47:51 AM EDT
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Quoted:
There are easements for those other roads surveyed or not.  They are clearly being used occasionally.
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The roads are just logging roads. Does that matter?
Link Posted: 9/3/2013 8:18:17 AM EDT
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Quoted:


The roads are just logging roads. Does that matter?
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Quoted:
Quoted:
There are easements for those other roads surveyed or not.  They are clearly being used occasionally.


The roads are just logging roads. Does that matter?


Who ever owns the property behind will have right to access their property through that property. I am pretty sure it will say it in the deed.
Link Posted: 9/3/2013 11:41:57 AM EDT
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Quoted:


Who ever owns the property behind will have right to access their property through that property. I am pretty sure it will say it in the deed.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
There are easements for those other roads surveyed or not.  They are clearly being used occasionally.


The roads are just logging roads. Does that matter?


Who ever owns the property behind will have right to access their property through that property. I am pretty sure it will say it in the deed.


Deed or not the roads are there and in use.  That's all it takes to lock in access forever.  New owners are not allowed to block access from existing roads.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 8:26:26 PM EDT
If they are legal easements the county will have records of them.

I cant stress enough to make sure YOU have free and clear access to the property and you understand everyone else's access/easements.  Check out the 20+ page multiple year thread about county corruption in OK and the big money spent defending a owners right to access.  Get a new survey if the one you have is more than a year old.  Heck, I would get one regardless.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1223033_Rural_county_government_corruption_on_tape_UPDATE_Page_29_new_video.html
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 9:58:52 PM EDT
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Quoted:
If they are legal easements the county will have records of them.

I cant stress enough to make sure YOU have free and clear access to the property and you understand everyone else's access/easements.  Check out the 20+ page multiple year thread about county corruption in OK and the big money spent defending a owners right to access.  Get a new survey if the one you have is more than a year old.  Heck, I would get one regardless.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1223033_Rural_county_government_corruption_on_tape_UPDATE_Page_29_new_video.html
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Yeah, I've read that one.  Definitely makes a person nervous.  The timber company land to the west is accessed from the other side.  All of the parcels in this section have their own easement access.  It seems good, but I'm going to check a bit more before getting serious.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 3:45:14 PM EDT
Call the county to see what the permit would cost to bring power in. If you get a meter, PG&E will want a county inspection tag on the panel. For the inspection tag you'll need a permit. Ask the county about cost, what that cost includes, if it is an over the counter permit, and if an on site inspection will be needed.

Meet your neighbors before you buy. Just because there is a road on the map, doesn't mean the neighbor can't lock a gate and tie up your road in court.
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