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Posted: 12/26/2011 1:56:59 PM EST
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That`s all I have to say.
Link Posted: 12/27/2011 8:20:14 AM EST
Yes, they are the bee's knees and the cat's meow of gardening!

Link Posted: 12/27/2011 8:28:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/27/2011 10:05:47 AM EST
Originally Posted By Feral:
Originally Posted By ACEB36TC:
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That`s all I have to say.


Kinda figured you must live in points-south.....my tiller is just gathering dust right now.



I used mine to turn everything under about three weeks ago. I am wishing now that I had not. Got an erosion problem with no winter crop to stop it.

But, I agree with the sentiment, the PTO tiller is the coolest piece of equipment I bought this year.

TRG
Link Posted: 12/27/2011 1:40:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/27/2011 1:41:20 PM EST by ColtRifle]
PTO tillers can be hard on the tractor. One of my brother's works on tractors and he told me that tractors with PTO problems often are caused by tillers. I think it's because many people use them to break unplowed ground. You should use a plow to break up fresh ground and then the tiller to turn the soil to fine soil. If you use it as it is intended to be used, it shouldn't cause any problems.
Link Posted: 12/29/2011 1:26:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By Feral:
Originally Posted By ACEB36TC:
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That`s all I have to say.


Kinda figured you must live in points-south.....my tiller is just gathering dust right now.



I used mine to turn everything under about three weeks ago. I am wishing now that I had not. Got an erosion problem with no winter crop to stop it.

But, I agree with the sentiment, the PTO tiller is the coolest piece of equipment I bought this year.

TRG
Can't you plant some vetch or rye or something? I remember sitting outside a bar in Texas in December in shorts.

Link Posted: 12/29/2011 2:03:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
PTO tillers can be hard on the tractor. One of my brother's works on tractors and he told me that tractors with PTO problems often are caused by tillers. I think it's because many people use them to break unplowed ground. You should use a plow to break up fresh ground and then the tiller to turn the soil to fine soil. If you use it as it is intended to be used, it shouldn't cause any problems.


??????

I use mine commercially and the only calls I ever get are for breaking sod/virgin ground (roots and rocks too). Mine has a tiny shear bolt–– 5/16" and I've only broken 1.

Link Posted: 12/29/2011 5:59:55 PM EST
Originally Posted By bassackwards:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
PTO tillers can be hard on the tractor. One of my brother's works on tractors and he told me that tractors with PTO problems often are caused by tillers. I think it's because many people use them to break unplowed ground. You should use a plow to break up fresh ground and then the tiller to turn the soil to fine soil. If you use it as it is intended to be used, it shouldn't cause any problems.


??????

I use mine commercially and the only calls I ever get are for breaking sod/virgin ground (roots and rocks too). Mine has a tiny shear bolt–– 5/16" and I've only broken 1.





It may be the type of soil you are breaking. In my area, soil is loaded with rocks and very hard with a good amount of clay.
Link Posted: 12/29/2011 6:15:48 PM EST
I am sure it is a bit hard on the tractor...heck everything you do causes some wear and tear. I used to have one with shear pins, but after about 25 pins sheared, when I stepped up to a 30 horse tractor, I got a 6' tiller with a clutch on it. It will slip, but no pins to shear. Use your tractor to break up the garden in the spring, but I still like a hand tiller to work in close to the rows.

Link Posted: 12/30/2011 5:36:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By Harvster:

Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By Feral:
Originally Posted By ACEB36TC:
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That`s all I have to say.


Kinda figured you must live in points-south.....my tiller is just gathering dust right now.



I used mine to turn everything under about three weeks ago. I am wishing now that I had not. Got an erosion problem with no winter crop to stop it.

But, I agree with the sentiment, the PTO tiller is the coolest piece of equipment I bought this year.

TRG
Can't you plant some vetch or rye or something? I remember sitting outside a bar in Texas in December in shorts.



Probably.

But, now the problem is soil saturation. I'll sink my tractor and do more harm than good. They are predicting two weeks of 'severe clear' around here, so I might be able to get some rye started with a hand thrower.

TRG
Link Posted: 12/30/2011 6:50:03 AM EST
Love my PTO drive tiller, but as others have said breaking ground with one IS hard on the machine, you can feel it strain, so rather than work a 1500.00 implement to death i just rip up the sod with a Middle buster and then go back and till up...ymmv and all that
Link Posted: 12/30/2011 9:48:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By TVLL62CAL:
Love my PTO drive tiller, but as others have said breaking ground with one IS hard on the machine, you can feel it strain, so rather than work a 1500.00 implement to death i just rip up the sod with a Middle buster and then go back and till up...ymmv and all that


I bought, and learned to use (mostly) a 3 bottom plow. I have been told that every 2-3 years I will need to plow again to keep from forming a hard bottom in the fields.

For those who are using the PTO tiller, a word of caution...I learned, the hard way, that a damaged gear in the PTO, from neglect, low fluids, or abuse can be a 1500-2500.00 repair, or more.

TRG
Link Posted: 12/30/2011 3:28:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:

I bought, and learned to use (mostly) a 3 bottom plow. I have been told that every 2-3 years I will need to plow again to keep from forming a hard bottom in the fields.

For those who are using the PTO tiller, a word of caution...I learned, the hard way, that a damaged gear in the PTO, from neglect, low fluids, or abuse can be a 1500-2500.00 repair, or more.

TRG


Plowing or tilling can leave the hard bottom. Plowing after tilling will take care of the hard bottom from the tiller but then the plow will leave a hard bottom after a period of time. I added a single shank subsoiler to my tools to solve this problem. I also use the subsoiler to loosen up the soil real nice in my carrot rows. I use a single bottom plow and the disk on my Cub when necessary. Then use a Howard Rotovator attached to the Kubota BX to finish the seed bed. The subsoiler works well on the BX since it is 4wd. I can get it down about 14" which is plenty deep for my purposes.

Link Posted: 12/31/2011 5:32:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By TVLL62CAL:
Love my PTO drive tiller, but as others have said breaking ground with one IS hard on the machine, you can feel it strain, so rather than work a 1500.00 implement to death i just rip up the sod with a Middle buster and then go back and till up...ymmv and all that


I bought, and learned to use (mostly) a 3 bottom plow. I have been told that every 2-3 years I will need to plow again to keep from forming a hard bottom in the fields.

For those who are using the PTO tiller, a word of caution...I learned, the hard way, that a damaged gear in the PTO, from neglect, low fluids, or abuse can be a 1500-2500.00 repair, or more.

TRG


I dont have enough weight to run a plow like I would want to, i have enough HP (36) but its a bit light of a machine Mahindra 3616, but as another said I also go back with a subsoiler and break it up down below 15" for the root crops
Link Posted: 12/31/2011 5:47:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/31/2011 5:50:48 AM EST by PA452]
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By bassackwards:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
PTO tillers can be hard on the tractor. One of my brother's works on tractors and he told me that tractors with PTO problems often are caused by tillers. I think it's because many people use them to break unplowed ground. You should use a plow to break up fresh ground and then the tiller to turn the soil to fine soil. If you use it as it is intended to be used, it shouldn't cause any problems.


??????

I use mine commercially and the only calls I ever get are for breaking sod/virgin ground (roots and rocks too). Mine has a tiny shear bolt–– 5/16" and I've only broken 1.





It may be the type of soil you are breaking. In my area, soil is loaded with rocks and very hard with a good amount of clay.


Same here. If you let the tiller back home hit unbroken ground, it's very rough and even tends to push the tractor forward.

We always plowed the garden first every year, and usually even ran a set of discs over it after plowing.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:24:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 5:25:05 PM EST by lumper]
Reverse rotation tillers do not push forward on the tractor like the forward rotation ones do. In any case, I do not use my tiller for breaking new soil. That is the job for the chisel plow.

However, if a tiller is all you have, I believe a reverse rotation tillers would be better for breaking new ground than the forward rotation tillers. With the forward rotation, you are trying to push the rocks down into the soil. With the reverse rotation tiller, you are trying to bring them to the surface of the ground. Rocks come up easier then they go down.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 9:01:55 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 2:15:50 AM EST
So what is that? A cultipacker or seeder being pulled behind your tiller?
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 3:31:01 AM EST
I sure do love mine.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:47:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By bassackwards:
So what is that? A cultipacker or seeder being pulled behind your tiller?


Yeah, Brillion Seeder behind a Howard Tiller, works pretty good. Seeder is ground driven, its a cool set up.

Its a picture from work, not my stuff though.
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