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Posted: 8/22/2015 6:13:11 AM EDT
OK, I need some new hunting boots.  I hunt is East Texas, it is wet and the temps could be from 90 to 25 during the season.  Most of the time it is in the 40's.  It is always wet.  My last pair of boots were some plain jane hikers I got at Bass Pro, they served me well, but they were cold at times.
Link Posted: 8/22/2015 8:42:51 AM EDT
OP,

Here is a thread I started last year in the Big Game forum.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_2/674470_I_Hit_The_Big_Game_Trifecta_and_I_need_a_New_Pair_of_Boots___.html

The thread is still open so you can post in there.

Hopefully you can find some useful info.

Hope this helps.



Link Posted: 8/22/2015 11:23:06 AM EDT
I'm currently wearing a pair of Cabella's 800gram Thinsulate rubber boots.  I like them, no problems so far, but I prefer Lacrosse.  I blew a hole in my old LaCrosses on the way to Missouri to hunt pheasant/quail in the snow and had to have some pronto.

I team these with a pair of Lacrosse "Grange" uninsulated rubber boots.  They are as comfortable as tennis shoes and last 4x as long as any other rubber boot I've owned.  I wear them in warmer temps (I've been wearing them this week), and the insulated when it gets cold.

Both of these are 18" tall boots, so you can cross small ditches and such without getting anything wet, and they are both comfortable enough to wear all day while walking.  I doubt if I ever buy another pair of traditional hunting boots.
Link Posted: 8/22/2015 6:47:49 PM EDT
I have Lacrosse Aerohead 3.5mm neoprene/rubber boots.  They are very dry and warm until them temperature drops down near or past freezing.  I don't think I would wear them as hot as 90 though.  Early bow season here in Virginia it's all about lightweight hikers.
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 11:01:11 PM EDT
Honestly, Rubber mud boots with wool socks did really well for me.

Once I got to central Tx, it's been snake boots only.  Bass Pro label has some that are water proof as well.  I had those for a few years and they stayed dry unless I just flat stood in a creek or something.
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 11:30:13 PM EDT
Muck Boots.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 8:32:35 AM EDT
I like Mucks if I'm not going to be walking much (I'm in between sizes).  Otherwise, I like Danner High Ground 400g boots.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 9:38:15 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rickesis:
I like Mucks if I'm not going to be walking much (I'm in between sizes). Otherwise, I like Danner High Ground 400g boots.
View Quote


I have 400 g High Grounds as well, and they are great boots.  400 g of inslulation is about as much as I can have in a boot and not overheat my feet walking around.  For short walks in very cold weather to sit in a stand all day I think I'd want more insulation.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 2:04:08 PM EDT
Muck boots...  I have both the Woody Max and Field Blazers - very comfortable.  When it's really cold - I double sock and add toe warmers :)
Link Posted: 8/27/2015 1:53:06 PM EDT
I have a pair of Wolverine 8pt boots. Waterproof, no insulation. VERY comfortable out of the box,
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 7:30:25 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rickesis:
I like Mucks if I'm not going to be walking much (I'm in between sizes).  Otherwise, I like Danner High Ground 400g boots.
View Quote



I'm running a combo of Muck Wetlands and Danner Pronghorns depending.  Basically everything is covered.

The mucks are great if the OP is going to be around/in water all day long.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 1:56:11 PM EDT
I'm not a "gear queer" but I know what works for me. With the temp range you described, I wouldn't try to go through life with just 1 pair of boots. For warmer conditions, GENUINE us military jungle boots. They are designed for warm/wet conditions, and dry faster than desert boots- hence their name. For colder conditions, I would suggest investing in a pair of Danners with thinsulate. I spent 23 years in SF, and these 2 boots worked well enough in nearly any conditions I was in all over the world.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 2:04:45 PM EDT
Thanks everyone. I have not made up my mind, still looking.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 11:42:59 PM EDT
The 800gram thinsulate rubber boots are the way to go.  They arent the warmest, but with wool socks and or some foot warmers they can be good.

   The biggest advantage to the rubber boots is that I have never seen deer react to passing a trail I walked on to get to my stand, whereas they stopped dead in their tracks and sniffed around when I wore my Rocky hiker/goretex boots even hours after walking to my stand
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