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Posted: 3/12/2011 2:44:12 PM EST
Im in the market for a purifier / filter. However, I know very little (lets say nothing) about them. Im looking for something that will give me the most versitility. Its gona be used for camping and emergancies. I would like something that has alot of capacity as there are 4 of us. Any information / sugestions would be helpful.. Thanks
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 4:16:12 PM EST
The Pocket Filter by Katadyn. Super sturdy and will supply 13000 gallons per filter.
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 4:25:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2011 4:34:41 PM EST by OverScoped]
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 6:59:07 PM EST
I'm with OverScoped, I got the Sawyer also. I got the cheap one to start off with. It came with Naglene type bottle and filter, but could be almost instantly used with the gravity bucket setup. Plan on upgrading to the better one soon. Price difference of about $80 more than the one I have, but it will filter out viruses also.
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 7:48:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By JoeRedman:
I'm with OverScoped, I got the Sawyer also. I got the cheap one to start off with. It came with Naglene type bottle and filter, but could be almost instantly used with the gravity bucket setup. Plan on upgrading to the better one soon. Price difference of about $80 more than the one I have, but it will filter out viruses also.


Cheap Sawyer is fine.

If you need more capability RO is the way to go for abt the same $$.

Link Posted: 3/13/2011 5:54:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By JoeRedman:
I'm with OverScoped, I got the Sawyer also. I got the cheap one to start off with. It came with Naglene type bottle and filter, but could be almost instantly used with the gravity bucket setup. Plan on upgrading to the better one soon. Price difference of about $80 more than the one I have, but it will filter out viruses also.


Cheap Sawyer is fine.

If you need more capability RO is the way to go for abt the same $$.



I like RO too, but the whole problem here is emergencies. during one, how long will the filter last? do you have an extra? what if you need it to last a year? the sawyer will last, will your RO, without changing the filter? does your RO work without running water?

for normal everyday use, RO is great, but its not an effective survival tool.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 9:34:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By OverScoped:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By JoeRedman:
I'm with OverScoped, I got the Sawyer also. I got the cheap one to start off with. It came with Naglene type bottle and filter, but could be almost instantly used with the gravity bucket setup. Plan on upgrading to the better one soon. Price difference of about $80 more than the one I have, but it will filter out viruses also.


Cheap Sawyer is fine.

If you need more capability RO is the way to go for abt the same $$.



I like RO too, but the whole problem here is emergencies. during one, how long will the filter last? do you have an extra? what if you need it to last a year? the sawyer will last, will your RO, without changing the filter? does your RO work without running water?

for normal everyday use, RO is great, but its not an effective survival tool.


We run RO multiple RO systems at different places, one of them in op since 2006 or thereabouts, when I first started learning abt RO.

I test them for TDS periodically and they are still doing great. The oldest one is one of the 'portable' ones [standard RO membrane but small ancillary filters] and has processed 1000's of gallons of water.

We also have used Sawyer extensively and in the pressurized [40 psi] system it's leaked [not made for pressurized systems].

If there were an emergency, the first type of filter I would want is a standard RO system, no question about it.

Yes we keep spares and have never needed to use them. That said I will continue to add to spares because spares are inexpensive right now.

Yes, RO will operate with gravity feed, see below.

A complete 'compact' style RO system is still available for about $60. The standard sized ones as low as $100 [last year].

Here's a link to RO.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=10&f=17&t=577038



Now that I've answered your questions "LOL!", please explain to me where your information re: RO, above, comes from.

Sounds like it is more or less just personal bias with baseless 'internet' claims, from a lack of experience and motivation to use an RO system and evaluate them yourself.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:09:16 AM EST
let me start by saying that i applaud you for your enthusiasm regarding RO systems. some background on me and why i think we are on two different pages here. i do not use a filter setup in my home. i drink tap water. i cannot use a RO anyway, because they produce too much waste water and i cant be dumping that into my septic tank. i conserve water, i turn it off in the shower when soaping up and while im brushing my teeth at the sink. BTW, i didnt tell you any facts about RO, i presented you with questions. The OP asked for advise about a camping and emergency water filter. The point zero two bucket system might not be good for backpack style camping, but its fine for a situation where you 4 wheel to your destination next to a running stream and you have to filter out ecoli and bacterias like that and is great for emergencies. does RO filter bacteria without UV and a power hook-up? one more question, does RO waste any water at all? and if it does, how does that fact make it easy to use in a situation where gathering water is a chore? About the only situation i see where it would be great is filtering seawater. BTW, i really dont want to argue with you. just the facts please.

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By OverScoped:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By JoeRedman:
I'm with OverScoped, I got the Sawyer also. I got the cheap one to start off with. It came with Naglene type bottle and filter, but could be almost instantly used with the gravity bucket setup. Plan on upgrading to the better one soon. Price difference of about $80 more than the one I have, but it will filter out viruses also.


Cheap Sawyer is fine.

If you need more capability RO is the way to go for abt the same $$.



I like RO too, but the whole problem here is emergencies. during one, how long will the filter last? do you have an extra? what if you need it to last a year? the sawyer will last, will your RO, without changing the filter? does your RO work without running water?

for normal everyday use, RO is great, but its not an effective survival tool.


We run RO multiple RO systems at different places, one of them in op since 2006 or thereabouts, when I first started learning abt RO.

I test them for TDS periodically and they are still doing great. The oldest one is one of the 'portable' ones [standard RO membrane but small ancillary filters] and has processed 1000's of gallons of water.

We also have used Sawyer extensively and in the pressurized [40 psi] system it's leaked [not made for pressurized systems].

If there were an emergency, the first type of filter I would want is a standard RO system, no question about it.

Yes we keep spares and have never needed to use them. That said I will continue to add to spares because spares are inexpensive right now.

Yes, RO will operate with gravity feed, see below.

A complete 'compact' style RO system is still available for about $60. The standard sized ones as low as $100 [last year].

Here's a link to RO.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=10&f=17&t=577038



Now that I've answered your questions "LOL!", please explain to me where your information re: RO, above, comes from.

Sounds like it is more or less just personal bias with baseless 'internet' claims, from a lack of experience and motivation to use an RO system and evaluate them yourself.



Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:16:16 AM EST
Originally Posted By OverScoped:
let me start by saying that i applaud you for your enthusiasm regarding RO systems. some background on me and why i think we are on two different pages here. i do not use a filter setup in my home. i drink tap water. i cannot use a RO anyway, because they produce too much waste water and i cant be dumping that into my septic tank. i conserve water, i turn it off in the shower when soaping up and while im brushing my teeth at the sink. BTW, i didnt tell you any facts about RO, i presented you with questions. The OP asked for advise about a camping and emergency water filter. The point zero two bucket system might not be good for backpack style camping, but its fine for a situation where you 4 wheel to your destination next to a running stream and you have to filter out ecoli and bacterias like that and is great for emergencies. does RO filter bacteria without UV and a power hook-up? one more question, does RO waste any water at all? and if it does, how does that fact make it easy to use in a situation where gathering water is a chore? About the only situation i see where it would be great is filtering seawater. BTW, i really dont want to argue with you. just the facts please.

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By OverScoped:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By JoeRedman:
I'm with OverScoped, I got the Sawyer also. I got the cheap one to start off with. It came with Naglene type bottle and filter, but could be almost instantly used with the gravity bucket setup. Plan on upgrading to the better one soon. Price difference of about $80 more than the one I have, but it will filter out viruses also.


Cheap Sawyer is fine.

If you need more capability RO is the way to go for abt the same $$.



I like RO too, but the whole problem here is emergencies. during one, how long will the filter last? do you have an extra? what if you need it to last a year? the sawyer will last, will your RO, without changing the filter? does your RO work without running water?

for normal everyday use, RO is great, but its not an effective survival tool.


We run RO multiple RO systems at different places, one of them in op since 2006 or thereabouts, when I first started learning abt RO.

I test them for TDS periodically and they are still doing great. The oldest one is one of the 'portable' ones [standard RO membrane but small ancillary filters] and has processed 1000's of gallons of water.

We also have used Sawyer extensively and in the pressurized [40 psi] system it's leaked [not made for pressurized systems].

If there were an emergency, the first type of filter I would want is a standard RO system, no question about it.

Yes we keep spares and have never needed to use them. That said I will continue to add to spares because spares are inexpensive right now.

Yes, RO will operate with gravity feed, see below.

A complete 'compact' style RO system is still available for about $60. The standard sized ones as low as $100 [last year].

Here's a link to RO.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=10&f=17&t=577038



Now that I've answered your questions "LOL!", please explain to me where your information re: RO, above, comes from.

Sounds like it is more or less just personal bias with baseless 'internet' claims, from a lack of experience and motivation to use an RO system and evaluate them yourself.





Understand O-S.

I'm being hollered at to get a move on and will respond later this evening with solutions.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:19:03 AM EST
thank you. i look forward to understanding more about this.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 3:05:28 PM EST
Me, too! I am always trying to get my learn-on about pretty much anything, but this really interests me. I got the Sawyer, because to be honest, that was the best Walmart had. Other than the internet, ain't much in the way of survival stuff anywhere near me. For $40 I can filter out damn near anything I may came across in N America, as far as lake, stream, whatnot. I am still learning the limitations of what I have and all the rest and want to improve on it any chance I get.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 5:09:00 PM EST
I started to order a sawyer .02 and found a little grumbling on the net about flow rates not being nearly what Sawyer claims. Anyone out there who has used theirs care to comment?
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 5:16:20 PM EST
I got it in my hand right now...but I wouldn't know how to test it other than finding some less than potable water and filter it. With no lab, I'd have to play guinea pig and take sawyer's word that it works, but then again that's it's intended use. I may run some potable water through it to test the flow rate, tho.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 6:06:34 PM EST
This is what I have done:

1- I have bought the cheaper 2-Black Filter Berkey Filter in clear plastic. This works great and gives us what we currently need (tastes good too.) We are using the flouride filters, too. From what I can predict, and assuming demand stays the same, this set of filters will last us 5 years.

2- I have bought 2 extra sets of Black Berkey filters for future emergency use and have put them away. I also have 2 - 5 gallon plastic food grade pails. I can drill 2 holes in these and make a higher volume water filter if needed.

3- On Expy37's recommendation, I have bought a 100 gal/day RO system on EBay for about $78. (Portable 100GPD 2 OUTPUT Reverse Osmosis RO+DI PO-5B-2W, seller I think was PureWaterClub) This also has the extra de-ionized filter. This will be used if, in an emergency, city water is turned off, and we have to treat and use our own well water. (We have a genny to push the pump).

4- I need to buy extra set(s) of filters for the RO system. Maybe next month....
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 8:09:27 PM EST
RO aside, if there aren't chemical hazards in the water, the Big Berky type of one can above the other filter [or the ceramic elements in plastic buckets], hiking filters, the Sawyer [the .2 is fine IMO vs the .02], the ceramic filters like off eBay or the $25 kind and other solutions I can't think of right now -will be a blessing if you need to process water to drink.

Having some cheap 1/4" plastic tubing [about $3 for 25 feet] and some of the 'quick connects' of assorted configs [valves, 1/8" NPT and larger adapters, couplings, etc] for the tubing to make a gravity feed could be invaluable.

Also, sediment and carbon block filters and housings are all plentiful right now [but WAY over-priced at the box stores], look on ebay and stock them deep.

Take a trip to the box store and study what's available. ignore the prices, everythings available on ebay in good quality for far less $.

Don't let your filter systems freeze!

Hook up your planned system and get familiar with it.

Water is likely the first thing you are going to wish you had and that's so overlooked. Having it immediately means you don't have to spend your precious time and resources obtaining it.

Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:26:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2011 10:45:42 PM EST by EXPY37]
"The OP asked for advise about a camping and emergency water filter.

"The point zero two bucket system might not be good for backpack style camping, but its fine for a situation where you 4 wheel to your destination next to a running stream and you have to filter out ecoli and bacterias like that and is great for emergencies. does RO filter bacteria without UV and a power hook-up?

"one more question, does RO waste any water at all? and if it does, how does that fact make it easy to use in a situation where gathering water is a chore?

"About the only situation i see where it would be great is filtering seawater."

Answering questions. Everything is my 'opinion' only.

The Sawyer .2 or .02 filters are great for backpacking if they don't get frozen [like most any filter]. There is no need for a bucket and the accessories, basically just put one end of the filter into dirty water and suck on the other end, ––-in principle. Water may not taste the best but it should be safe per Sawyer's claims. Add accessories as needed. An extra stage of carbon block might make the water taste delicious.

RO can filter water effectively without UV [UV is an extra protection that consumes little power, only a few watts]. Also RO filters to the molecular level and certainly will get "big" stuff like even viruses.

I've never used UV with RO but have the UV 'accessory' ready if ever needed. The are relatively cheap. The only reason I can think of is if a pathogen is introduced into the water source.

Re 'does RO waste water?' That depends on how you use your system. Member LadyMacbeth blocked his 'waste/overflow' port and backflushed his RO membrane every week or so at his cabin. Easy solution.

We restrict our RO filter's overflow to a trickle with a quick connect valve on the output and have had no problems. In any case, overflow water can be refiltered or used for other purposes, considering the amount processed isn't that great and primarily used for drinking and cooking.

Household RO filters aren't designed for seawater. Seawater requires special membranes and high pressures.

Certainly RO is not a magic bullet for filtering water. It's another tool in a growing filtration tool box and a powerful one at that.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 4:55:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 4:56:32 AM EST by par0thead151]
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 8:15:53 AM EST
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
"The OP asked for advise about a camping and emergency water filter.

"The point zero two bucket system might not be good for backpack style camping, but its fine for a situation where you 4 wheel to your destination next to a running stream and you have to filter out ecoli and bacterias like that and is great for emergencies. does RO filter bacteria without UV and a power hook-up?

"one more question, does RO waste any water at all? and if it does, how does that fact make it easy to use in a situation where gathering water is a chore?

"About the only situation i see where it would be great is filtering seawater."

Answering questions. Everything is my 'opinion' only.

The Sawyer .2 or .02 filters are great for backpacking if they don't get frozen [like most any filter]. There is no need for a bucket and the accessories, basically just put one end of the filter into dirty water and suck on the other end, ––-in principle. Water may not taste the best but it should be safe per Sawyer's claims. Add accessories as needed. An extra stage of carbon block might make the water taste delicious.

RO can filter water effectively without UV [UV is an extra protection that consumes little power, only a few watts]. Also RO filters to the molecular level and certainly will get "big" stuff like even viruses.

I've never used UV with RO but have the UV 'accessory' ready if ever needed. The are relatively cheap. The only reason I can think of is if a pathogen is introduced into the water source.

Re 'does RO waste water?' That depends on how you use your system. Member LadyMacbeth blocked his 'waste/overflow' port and backflushed his RO membrane every week or so at his cabin. Easy solution.

We restrict our RO filter's overflow to a trickle with a quick connect valve on the output and have had no problems. In any case, overflow water can be refiltered or used for other purposes, considering the amount processed isn't that great and primarily used for drinking and cooking.

Household RO filters aren't designed for seawater. Seawater requires special membranes and high pressures.

Certainly RO is not a magic bullet for filtering water. It's another tool in a growing filtration tool box and a powerful one at that.


I appreciate your knowledge concerning home-based filters. I have never had to spend much time with them due to my home having a deep well and large storage tank. I am however considering getting one for a second BOL so the knowledge is useful.

I have to disagree with your assessment of the Sawyer filters for backpacking. I'm an avid backpacker, and wouldn't consider using a gravity or suck style filter for my primary water source. They are fine for car camping or base camp use but they are not good for hydrating on the go.

I keep a small straw style filter in my pack for sucking water out of pools or rocks too shallow for my hand pump style filter if water is scarce. The reality is, when you are moving by foot over great distances you need water on your back that you can drink on demand, to replace the water you are expending. If you live in a climate where water is plentiful and stream crossings are very common then perhaps you could get by, by only hydrating when you cross one, but many of us live in drier climes, and must carry enough water to get that next source. If the distances are very great you simply cannot carry enough water from the onset of your trip. You will need to periodically fill up the containers you are carrying on your back, be they canteens or hydration bladders. Standing around waiting for a gravity feed to fill them is burning precious day-light, and trying to fill a container with a suck/straw style filter is a lesson in futility. This is the reason serious backpackers carry hand pump style filters.

(Sorry for any typos in post I seem to have developed some sort of bug where I can't see what I'm typing.)
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 8:34:45 AM EST
I was under the impression ( and I could be wrong here) that the sawyer could be hooked up inline with a camelback or other type bladder storage.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 11:35:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 12:51:36 PM EST by EXPY37]



It probably is a good 'starter filter'. There are better prices if you search around, this ones pricy.

You might not need the "point zero two" and the lesser Sawyer filter might serve you just as well.

As far as being 'portable', the Sawyer is about as portable as you can get, the actual filter cartridge weighs very little. The filtering process is slower compared with a pump type hiking filter if you need immediate results.

Take a look what Sawyers Walmart offers.




Link Posted: 3/14/2011 11:48:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 11:57:46 AM EST by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By Hunters_Moon:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
"The OP asked for advise about a camping and emergency water filter.

"The point zero two bucket system might not be good for backpack style camping, but its fine for a situation where you 4 wheel to your destination next to a running stream and you have to filter out ecoli and bacterias like that and is great for emergencies. does RO filter bacteria without UV and a power hook-up?

"one more question, does RO waste any water at all? and if it does, how does that fact make it easy to use in a situation where gathering water is a chore?

"About the only situation i see where it would be great is filtering seawater."

Answering questions. Everything is my 'opinion' only.

The Sawyer .2 or .02 filters are great for backpacking if they don't get frozen [like most any filter]. There is no need for a bucket and the accessories, basically just put one end of the filter into dirty water and suck on the other end, ––-in principle. Water may not taste the best but it should be safe per Sawyer's claims. Add accessories as needed. An extra stage of carbon block might make the water taste delicious.

RO can filter water effectively without UV [UV is an extra protection that consumes little power, only a few watts]. Also RO filters to the molecular level and certainly will get "big" stuff like even viruses.

I've never used UV with RO but have the UV 'accessory' ready if ever needed. The are relatively cheap. The only reason I can think of is if a pathogen is introduced into the water source.

Re 'does RO waste water?' That depends on how you use your system. Member LadyMacbeth blocked his 'waste/overflow' port and backflushed his RO membrane every week or so at his cabin. Easy solution.

We restrict our RO filter's overflow to a trickle with a quick connect valve on the output and have had no problems. In any case, overflow water can be refiltered or used for other purposes, considering the amount processed isn't that great and primarily used for drinking and cooking.

Household RO filters aren't designed for seawater. Seawater requires special membranes and high pressures.

Certainly RO is not a magic bullet for filtering water. It's another tool in a growing filtration tool box and a powerful one at that.


I appreciate your knowledge concerning home-based filters. I have never had to spend much time with them due to my home having a deep well and large storage tank. I am however considering getting one for a second BOL so the knowledge is useful.

I have to disagree with your assessment of the Sawyer filters for backpacking. I'm an avid backpacker, and wouldn't consider using a gravity or suck style filter for my primary water source. They are fine for car camping or base camp use but they are not good for hydrating on the go.

I keep a small straw style filter in my pack for sucking water out of pools or rocks too shallow for my hand pump style filter if water is scarce. The reality is, when you are moving by foot over great distances you need water on your back that you can drink on demand, to replace the water you are expending. If you live in a climate where water is plentiful and stream crossings are very common then perhaps you could get by, by only hydrating when you cross one, but many of us live in drier climes, and must carry enough water to get that next source. If the distances are very great you simply cannot carry enough water from the onset of your trip. You will need to periodically fill up the containers you are carrying on your back, be they canteens or hydration bladders. Standing around waiting for a gravity feed to fill them is burning precious day-light, and trying to fill a container with a suck/straw style filter is a lesson in futility. This is the reason serious backpackers carry hand pump style filters.

(Sorry for any typos in post I seem to have developed some sort of bug where I can't see what I'm typing.)


You make excellent points about the potential need for fast bulk water processing. It all depends on the mission and pointing out the pros and cons helps enlighten all of us here.

Our most frequented areas are arid as well.

[Disclaimer, in my BOB -that I hope to never need, I carry an MSR EX, we both carry straws and chlorine dioxide tabs, and thinking abt your post I'll probably have my SO carry a Sawyer with some tubing because the filter element weighs practically nothing and it can be used in a variety of ways, bulk or immediate]

For your BOL, why not watch ebay for good deals on any of the Sawyer filters? Also, a couple of the ceramic filters from there in standard 10 inch housings preceeded by one or two sediment filters in the same kinds of housings, then a carbon block filter -before the ceramic- all gravity fed, is an economical and simple way to go if there is no worry about chemical contaminents in your water. Gravity fed. Get 1\4 inch tubing and an asst of plastic quick connects and other fittings and valves.

The reason for the multiple pre-filtering is to protect your key [ceramic, Sawyer, etc] filter above all. The prefilters are cheap and ebay is an excellent source for bulk inexpensive replacement filter kit purchases.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 11:59:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 1:12:23 PM EST by EXPY37]
Oh, hook up the base filtering gear and learn to use it ––before needing to.

And check Costco and Sams for good quality replacement 10" filter kits at excellent pricing.

http://www.costco.com/Common/Search.aspx?whse=BC&topnav=&search=water%20filter&N=0&Ntt=water%20filter&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 1:30:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By JoeRedman:
I was under the impression ( and I could be wrong here) that the sawyer could be hooked up inline with a camelback or other type bladder storage.


There are definately some filters that can be placed on your drink tube. All of the Sawyers that I have seen would be larger than I would want hanging off my shoulder while hiking. Perhaps someone with more experience in that realm can post about it.

I've always been hesitant to place "dirty" water inside my bladders. Simply, because I use the same bladder for other activities like jogging or riding my bike where a filter on the tube would be unnecessary. Or if I need to loan a bladder to a family member. Perhaps this is a completely unfounded fear, and it certainly wouldn't apply to everyone or every situation.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 1:41:26 PM EST
The sawyer is very delicate. It can freeze and break internally if dropped. From contacting sawyer about it breaking from being dropped or frozen they told me there is no way for me to tell if it is broken. This is unsettling to me because I wouldn't know if it was working or not. Just make sure you take care of the filter.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 3:48:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By BoovarBjarki:
The sawyer is very delicate. It can freeze and break internally if dropped. From contacting sawyer about it breaking from being dropped or frozen they told me there is no way for me to tell if it is broken. This is unsettling to me because I wouldn't know if it was working or not. Just make sure you take care of the filter.



Thanks for that info. I'm not as worried about freezing as I am about dropping it. Just by the nature of the design and operation I would probably drop it- a lot. I was hoping to fill a niche with the sawyer for vehicle BO. Looks like I must gather more info.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 4:50:16 AM EST
Could someone explain the "all the wastewater with an RO system" statement.

I thought we were talking about portable camping type units?
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 7:50:27 AM EST
I am quite happy with my MSR Miniworks filter.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 8:48:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By cfcw:
Originally Posted By BoovarBjarki:
The sawyer is very delicate. It can freeze and break internally if dropped. From contacting sawyer about it breaking from being dropped or frozen they told me there is no way for me to tell if it is broken. This is unsettling to me because I wouldn't know if it was working or not. Just make sure you take care of the filter.



Thanks for that info. I'm not as worried about freezing as I am about dropping it. Just by the nature of the design and operation I would probably drop it- a lot. I was hoping to fill a niche with the sawyer for vehicle BO. Looks like I must gather more info.



I'd suggest we all unscrew a Sawyer filter and look at the way the flexible fibers are 'arranged' in the housing.

Then we compare the Sawyer construction to our ceramic filters -and see which is likely to be damaged from a fall.

I too worry about freezing ANY filter, especially but not limited too, ceramic filters.

That's why I encourage folks making custom systems to agressively protect their filters from hazards.

Link Posted: 3/15/2011 10:54:53 AM EST
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By cfcw:
Originally Posted By BoovarBjarki:
The sawyer is very delicate. It can freeze and break internally if dropped. From contacting sawyer about it breaking from being dropped or frozen they told me there is no way for me to tell if it is broken. This is unsettling to me because I wouldn't know if it was working or not. Just make sure you take care of the filter.



Thanks for that info. I'm not as worried about freezing as I am about dropping it. Just by the nature of the design and operation I would probably drop it- a lot. I was hoping to fill a niche with the sawyer for vehicle BO. Looks like I must gather more info.



I'd suggest we all unscrew a Sawyer filter and look at the way the flexible fibers are 'arranged' in the housing.

Then we compare the Sawyer construction to our ceramic filters -and see which is likely to be damaged from a fall.

I too worry about freezing ANY filter, especially but not limited too, ceramic filters.

That's why I encourage folks making custom systems to agressively protect their filters from hazards.



I am pretty sure the fibers are not flexible. Also the way they are arranged in the housing is only visible on the end when you separate it. If you notice also when you separate the housing you will see a few of the fibers are blocked with the resin used to hold them in place.
Most ceramic filters can be dropped in their housing and be fine, its when you take out the filter to clean it you need to make sure you don't drop it. Not a big deal. However with the sawyer, you drop it while its in the housing and it could break and there still is no way to tell if its functioning or not.

Also think about cleaning both systems. A ceramic filter that you clean with a scotch bright sponge, just wipe it a couple times, is easily done. With the Sawyer system you need to backwash, a bit of a pain in the neck to do with out a pump and/or faucet and contamination could become a problem.

A setup I use is the Katedyn pocket with a Sawyer 1mill purifier on the output hose. This way the pocket gets all the filth, bacteria, protozoa and cysts out while the Sawyer only has to stress on the viruses. I can get through a lot of water before cleaning this way. Also the pocket aids in the backwashing process of the Sawyer. I only clean when the flow is slow.

Still there is no quick and easy perfect way to purify water, specially when shtf and replacement filters and batteries are long gone. We will be using cloth to filter debris and boil for safety.

Link Posted: 3/15/2011 12:05:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/15/2011 12:11:17 PM EST by EXPY37]
I like your idea to use the ceramic pump and the Sawyer in series. Provides better filtration and backup with little additional weight.

Having looked at the Sawyer, my impression is the fibers are rather flexible and would survive being dropped.

Yep, so stock filters deep and protect them.
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