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Posted: 11/12/2012 4:36:47 PM EST
Ok looking over my owners manual.....going to stock up on some extra parts for my honda gennys.....looked at the maintenece schedule and this is what I see.

Change oil at 20 hrs.....then again at 100 hrs.....then nothing listed out to 300 hrs

Clean air filter at 50 hrs.......then nothing listed again out to 300 hrs

Change spark plug at 300 hrs


Does this all seem right to you??
Link Posted: 11/12/2012 5:06:57 PM EST
The air filter is primarily an environmental concern. On a construction site 300 hours won't be enough. In your back yard or on your patio it may be fine.

The oil change interval is normal, sort of a 2 stage break in. Spark plugs have increased in quality and durability quite a bit. 300 hours should be fine as well unless it gets run with the choke on or tipped over and oil gets in the cylinder.
Link Posted: 11/12/2012 5:14:30 PM EST
Ok so with oil change at 20 hrs....then again at 100 hrs......then again at???
Link Posted: 11/12/2012 5:23:30 PM EST
Originally Posted By survivorman:
Ok so with oil change at 20 hrs....then again at 100 hrs......then again at???


My rule of thumb, after break-in: "Change oil once per week of running"

It's close enough, doesn't require a clock or timer, and I can remember it.
Link Posted: 11/12/2012 5:48:04 PM EST
I thought you were saying it was oil changes at 20, 100 and 300.

I'd say every 100 after the first 100.
Link Posted: 11/13/2012 2:43:55 AM EST
It makes perfect sense. The reason for changing the oil more frequently in the beginning is for engine break in. There will be more debris in the oil the first couple of times. I would follow their maintenance.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 6:05:49 PM EST
Change after 20 for break in. These air cooled motors run warm so I like to use synthetic. The synthetic oils are better in the heat and don't break down as quick. 100 hours seems a bit much. I would do half that.

I have a stupid theory about equipment and wear that's on it or mantinance needed. Compairing hours on motors to "estimated milage" in a car. At quarter throttle (on the generator) think of it as quarter throttle in a car or 20 MPH. At 20 MPH (quarter throttle), you can run the generator 100 hours and get an estimated 2,000 miles on it. At half throttle 45 mph. So your run time per oil change goes down per the throttle used. At full throttle on the generator (running near max rated wattage output), 90 MPH. So after 35 hours of running time on full throttle the generator has 3,100 ish miles on it. Then deside at what "milage" your going to change the oil in your generator at. Again, this is my stupid theory to comparing hours to wear and mantinance needed.

Obviously with some engines the stress on the motor is lower so the estimated milage would change. And other things like heat cycles, and motor condition need to be considered. If the motor is older with high hours, you'll get more contaminates in the oil quicker than a new tight motor. Also environmental conditions will change the estimated milage. Like ambient air temp, air quality, or generator storage (inside or outside in the sun rain).

I've changed the oil on generators that came out looking like a watery mud with zero vescosity. Watch it close. Pull the dip stick and rub it in your fingers. It is obvious when oil is shot out and that cuts tons if life out of the motor. That's where my estimated milage threory came from. Trying to figure out how to keep it from getting to the point of damaging wear.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 6:22:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/23/2012 6:23:23 AM EST by dab2]
I have a Honda too and go by their maintenance schedule and haven't had any problems. Then I don't run mine everyday either since it's just for emergencies. I do run mine at least twice a month for about an hour each time. I like to use it with a load on it such as shop vac or any power tools I may be using at the time. We do however do two weekends a year, one in the winter and one in the summer where we shut down all our electricity and run off the generator and cook off our emergency equipment and supplies. It is a good way to practice and see what works and doesn't work and find out where your generator maxes out.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 10:04:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By dab2:
...We do however do two weekends a year, one in the winter and one in the summer where we shut down all our electricity and run off the generator and cook off our emergency equipment and supplies. It is a good way to practice and see what works and doesn't work and find out where your generator maxes out.



I do that too, except mine is scheduled but the power company.

Link Posted: 11/23/2012 3:34:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By PugglePod9000:
Originally Posted By dab2:
...We do however do two weekends a year, one in the winter and one in the summer where we shut down all our electricity and run off the generator and cook off our emergency equipment and supplies. It is a good way to practice and see what works and doesn't work and find out where your generator maxes out.



I do that too, except mine is scheduled but the power company.



We too have experienced a power outage from storms. Last one lasted 2 1/2 days without power but it was a walk in the park for us. We love being prepared and practiced up!...

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