Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 1/26/2011 8:21:39 PM EDT
So im looking for a bow. I have no knowledge about bows except a basic understanding and how to fire them. Im looking for information that will direct me in the right direction. So the type of bow im looking for is one that has alot of power. I dont care how hard it is to pull back or how fast or silent it can be. Im looking for something that is tough and can handle alot of abuse. The bow should be able to last a long time with only regular maintance. Any help would be very appreciated.
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 1:25:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 8:43:17 AM EDT
I'd like accuracy but when ever i shot a bow before. I found that i was mostly the determining factor when it came to accuracy. As for why i want the power. Well i believe i can get everything else to work out once i start off on the right basis. Is there any thing out there that fits the description?
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 7:58:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By unknlogar:
So im looking for a bow. I have no knowledge about bows except a basic understanding and how to fire them. Im looking for information that will direct me in the right direction. So the type of bow im looking for is one that has alot of power. I dont care how hard it is to pull back or how fast or silent it can be. Im looking for something that is tough and can handle alot of abuse. The bow should be able to last a long time with only regular maintance. Any help would be very appreciated.
First off there are some things we need to know:

1) Just what are you planning on doing with this bow? If you're going to hunt with it, then the things you say you don't care about are what will actually matter. Who cares how "powerful" the bow is if it's so noisy that you scare the animal and it jumps the string. "Power" only matters if you can hit the animal.
2) You say you don't care how hard it is to pull back. Are you a body builder or something who can repeatedly pull a 70# bow back while sitting down? If not, then you should care how hard it is to pull back.
3) Just what kind of abuse are you planning on putting your bow through? Bows can be tough, but abuse is a different story.
4) What specifically do you mean by "power?" Are you referring to speed, or momentum? A bow set at 60# with an IBO speed of 320fps can shoot a 400grain arrow with enough force to kill an elk. If you want speed, then you can look at the speed bows
5) What do you consider regular maintenance?

Originally Posted By unknlogar:
I'd like accuracy but when ever i shot a bow before. I found that i was mostly the determining factor when it came to accuracy.

That's the way it always will be. No bow will turn a poor shooter into a great one. Only practice will do that, and then an old hickory bow will work.

Maybe this is what you're looking for.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 7:33:42 AM EDT

1) I want to go hunting. The areas im considering going are places friends of mine have told me about in different states. Alot of them are around watering holes and a few are by waterfalls or areas with heavy noise pollution.
2) Im not a body builder or very strong. But when it comes to things like this. I practice, practice, practice, practice, and then some more practice. So being difficult to pull back will not be an issue since i plan on practicing and that will require me to pull back the string and slowly release it without sending an arrow down range.
3) I have a hard time with equipment. I take care of my stuff and try to keep it in the best working order. But like anything things get dirty or scuffed. I want something that if i fall in the mud but want to continue to utilize i can without having to scrap a trip for a little weather.
4) Im looking for momentum. The speed isn't really that important to me. But i want to utilize a wide range of arrows. Some for big game and some for small fowl.
5) Regular maintence would be tightening, cleaning, possible string replacement. But i really dont know anything about replacing cams or fixing the body of a bow.


Im sorry if I was to vague earlier. Im just know trying to get back into this and i haven't been hunting before. I know some people who agreed to take me with them in the next year and i want to make sure im not the ass end of a joke. Thanks for the help.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 10:00:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By unknlogar:

1) I want to go hunting. The areas im considering going are places friends of mine have told me about in different states. Alot of them are around watering holes and a few are by waterfalls or areas with heavy noise pollution. The amount of noise pollution is of little importance. The quieter, the better.
2) Im not a body builder or very strong. But when it comes to things like this. I practice, practice, practice, practice, and then some more practice. So being difficult to pull back will not be an issue since i plan on practicing and that will require me to pull back the string and slowly release it without sending an arrow down range. The 2 most common #age ranges for adult males are 50-60 and 60-70. I'd say that maybe 3% of that group would shoot at 70#'s. It's way too easy to kill with less.
3) I have a hard time with equipment. I take care of my stuff and try to keep it in the best working order. But like anything things get dirty or scuffed. I want something that if i fall in the mud but want to continue to utilize i can without having to scrap a trip for a little weather. There are plenty of good ones out there. I'll try not to sound like too much of a fanboy here, but Hoyt's have a reputation for being very over-engineered. There's plenty of other good ones out there too, but Hoyt's are tough to beat on the durability end.
4) Im looking for momentum. The speed isn't really that important to me. But i want to utilize a wide range of arrows. Some for big game and some for small fowl. The proper carbon arrow will probably be all you need. Something around 400 grains +/- is fairly average. Heavier = more kinetic energy, lighter = more slop on range estimation.
5) Regular maintence would be tightening, cleaning, possible string replacement. But i really dont know anything about replacing cams or fixing the body of a bow. You'll need to get a tube of bow wax and apply it to the string every few shooting sessions. Under normal usage, taking your bow into a proshop every other year to have the string and cable replaced would probably suffice.


Im sorry if I was to vague earlier. Im just know trying to get back into this and i haven't been hunting before. I know some people who agreed to take me with them in the next year and i want to make sure im not the ass end of a joke. Thanks for the help.


Link Posted: 1/28/2011 7:25:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2011 2:41:43 PM EDT by loonybin]

Originally Posted By unknlogar:

2) Im not a body builder or very strong. But when it comes to things like this. I practice, practice, practice, practice, and then some more practice. So being difficult to pull back will not be an issue since i plan on practicing and that will require me to pull back the string and slowly release it without sending an arrow down range.

If you do what you are saying, you will simply put extra wear on your bow and strings, and become lopsided muscularly. Doing upright rows, lat pulldowns, chin ups/pull ups, bicep curls, and other strength training that builds your biceps, traps, lats, deltoids and spinatus muscles evenly will benefit you more than pulling a bow and letting it down slowly.
3) I have a hard time with equipment. I take care of my stuff and try to keep it in the best working order. But like anything things get dirty or scuffed. I want something that if i fall in the mud but want to continue to utilize i can without having to scrap a trip for a little weather.

Most equipment will handle that. I have to echo what Buckshot4U says about Hoyt. They are built like a tank. They aren't the fastest, but they are tough bows. I don't own one, either. I am getting a Maitland Retribution that is also really good.
4) Im looking for momentum. The speed isn't really that important to me. But i want to utilize a wide range of arrows. Some for big game and some for small fowl.

Like I said, a 320fps IBO with a 400gr arrow will take elk. Just get a lighter arrow for small game. What is your draw length? Mine is a short 27", and with 60# I can get a 380gr arrow up to 250fps, which has enough energy to take elk and black bear. Because my draw length is so short and the bow I ordered is so smooth, I ordered the 60-70# limbs to take advantage of every pound of draw weight I can. I still don't plan on shooting at 70#, though. I figure 65# will be my max from a seated or kneeling position (for example, in a hunting blind).
5) Regular maintence would be tightening, cleaning, possible string replacement. But i really dont know anything about replacing cams or fixing the body of a bow.
All of them are pretty easy to maintain in that regard. The thing about replacing strings is that you need a bow press to do it yourself. If you have a bow press to replace strings, then replacing cams is not too much harder... just a few extra tools. Fixing a riser is a manufacturer's job, as they are solid aircraft grade aluminum (same kind our ARs are made out of) with tons of CNC machined cut-outs to lighten them. You won't have to worry about fixing those.

Link Posted: 1/28/2011 7:56:20 PM EDT
Thanks for the info. It is really helpful. I am trying to learn as much as i can. Thanks again for the info.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 11:11:32 PM EDT
The best advice I can give is go to your local bow shop and shoot a few different kinds. Find the best one that fits you comfortablely and it will be a joy to shoot. There are some real good brands out there like, Hoyt, Mathews, PSE, Bowtech is just a few but pretty top end. I shoot a Mathews DXT single solo cam which is suppose to be very low maintence as the cam shouldn't come out of tune. It draws smooth to me, short for the small places I want to be in the woods, very quiet. I have a 50lb-60lb bow which I have maxed at 60lb which is fine for me, I don't struggle to pull back. When your just sitting in the woods and its cold out it may get harder to pull it back so go with whats comfortable for you. As far as maintence I just wax my strings, replace arrows as needed. I shoot thru the summer to stay ready for hunting season so my bow gets used pretty good. I just replaced my strings recently and its been about 2 maybe 3 years I think, put custom strings on and I'm told they should last abit longer. Figure out how much you want to spend, go to a local shop, not Bass Pro, and try what they have.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 9:22:19 AM EDT
What price range sounds good?
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 11:21:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By unknlogar:
What price range sounds good?


That you have to figure out. My bow was the premire bow in that year, paid $750. After sights, rest, arrows, etc it was like $1065 out the door. Since then I replaced some things, upgraded. Have easliy $1300 not counting arrows. There are packages that are very nice at reasonable prices too. I'm sure you can get a set up for $500. I really enjoy bow hunting and the time in the woods for our 3D shoots so I justify spending what I want. Once you harvest a few deer with a bow you can get that bug. Spending what I spent is about right for me. Get a nice reasonable set up and really see how much you will use it. Be carefull though, getting that archery bug is pretty bad. You want to get the best and have the best on it.

Link Posted: 1/31/2011 6:50:07 AM EDT
I guess that means i'll have to use some restrain and try to pace my self. LOL
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 10:29:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By fmkenner:
Originally Posted By unknlogar:
What price range sounds good?


That you have to figure out. My bow was the premire bow in that year, paid $750. After sights, rest, arrows, etc it was like $1065 out the door. Since then I replaced some things, upgraded. Have easliy $1300 not counting arrows. There are packages that are very nice at reasonable prices too. I'm sure you can get a set up for $500. I really enjoy bow hunting and the time in the woods for our 3D shoots so I justify spending what I want. Once you harvest a few deer with a bow you can get that bug. Spending what I spent is about right for me. Get a nice reasonable set up and really see how much you will use it. Be carefull though, getting that archery bug is pretty bad. You want to get the best and have the best on it.



I agree 100%. I now have 3 fully set up bows. 2 Bowtechs and 1 PSE.

He'll get hooked! And unlike BRD, he can shoot his bow everyday without the huge ammo bill!
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 9:08:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HighStrung1:
Originally Posted By fmkenner:
Originally Posted By unknlogar:
What price range sounds good?


That you have to figure out. My bow was the premire bow in that year, paid $750. After sights, rest, arrows, etc it was like $1065 out the door. Since then I replaced some things, upgraded. Have easliy $1300 not counting arrows. There are packages that are very nice at reasonable prices too. I'm sure you can get a set up for $500. I really enjoy bow hunting and the time in the woods for our 3D shoots so I justify spending what I want. Once you harvest a few deer with a bow you can get that bug. Spending what I spent is about right for me. Get a nice reasonable set up and really see how much you will use it. Be carefull though, getting that archery bug is pretty bad. You want to get the best and have the best on it.



I agree 100%. I now have 3 fully set up bows. 2 Bowtechs and 1 PSE.

He'll get hooked! And unlike BRD, he can shoot his bow everyday without the huge ammo bill!
Yes, B.A.D. (Bow Acquisition Disorder) is far worse than BRD. I'm just getting started in my new old addiction (got my first bow when I was 13, haven't shot since I was 14), and already I'm thinking of how I'm going to upgrade my first new bow in over 20 years –– a Maitland Retribution –– and it hasn't even arrived yet!

Top Top