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Posted: 9/7/2013 11:29:03 AM EDT
I'll admit it, when I first jumped on the preparedness wagon, I was very shortsighted and focused on acquiring the sexy aspects therein namely guns and ammo forts.  I still enjoy that part of the journey, but as I became more knowledgeable (still have plenty to learn), I began working on preparing for the more mundane issues that come up in day to day life.  Doing this has led to getting through the little hiccups very comfortably and without having to slow down.  I just wanted to share a few examples of many that have recently popped up that previously would have added more stress and frustration.  

Have a good assortment of first aid supplies - During my son's pee-wee football game, our QB cut his elbow open pretty good.  Not bad enough to need stitches, but he was dripping blood pretty good.  Some first aid kits popped out, but they only had small band aids, and a band aid wasn't going to do it to get him back in the game.  Thanks to Patriot Nurse's youtube vids, I have a somewhat decent FAK I put together in my get home bag with plenty of gauze, bandages, 4x4s, tape, etc.  We got him patched up and back out there fairly quick.

Have tools to fix things and know how to use them - My friends and I ride a lot of ATV trails pretty regularly.  One day we were miles back in the woods on the trails, and my friends tire went flat.  There was no way he could ride it flat back to the truck, but I always keep an assortment of tools on my ATV including a small air compressor and a plug kit.  I had him back up and running within 20 minutes.  There have also been many times someone has broken down on the trails, but thanks to me and my tools which also includes duct tape and bailing wire, we always get back to camp with all the rides.

Keep some spare cash in different denominations with you - We were on vacation recently and needed to park on a downtown street that had parking meters in order to see a show.  In my day to day life, I pay for everything with my debit card and really don't carry cash except for a stashed $20 in my wallet.  Of course that won't help with a parking meter, but I have also gotten into the habit of keeping a roll of quarters in every vehicle.  Because I had my quarters, we didn't miss the attraction we were going to see that day.

So the previous examples aren't very exciting.  I'm not using my preps to save the world from zombies or treking across 80 miles of wasteland leading my family to safe haven, but that's not the point I'm trying to make.  I have figured out you really should be more prepared for the everyday snafus that will occur to you from time to time.  Everyone that reads this post has had to endure a flat tire at one time or another, but it's pretty safe to assume no one has had to shoot at hordes of zombies.  In addition, flying through these scenarios without having to slow down also prompts others that witness it to prepare themselves.  I had several parents tell me at the game noted above how they were impressed with my FAK.  They were disappointed that they weren't prepared for this situation, but they would be ready for next week's game.  

Also, my wife has really warmed up to the idea after witnessing me breeze through a lot of similar situations posted above.  When I first jumped in, I think she thought I was a kook for talking about flu pandemics, EMPs, government collapse, asteroids, etc.  These major issues are maybe something to keep in the back of your mind and prepare for long term, but these are situations that she really doesn't buy into or relate to right off the bat just because her husband gets panicky after reading some articles or a fiction book on the subject.  However, she can relate to being able to pop an advil or immodium while in the middle of no where on a trip, not having to drive 30 miles into town for another bag of sugar when cooking something, or having some flashlights and a weather radio at hand when a bad storm rolls through and knocks out the power.

Wrapping it up, let me say that I get it now.  A lot of knowledgeable people on this board always say be ready for situations that that are most likely to happen to you.  I will attest that they know what they are talking about.
Link Posted: 9/7/2013 2:16:13 PM EDT
You know what? Those examples ARE exciting. You showed several folks what a little simple planning can do, and spreading the reality of preparedness (instead of the reality tv show version of it) is what makes a real difference. Good for you on all counts, and good for your wife coming on board. Well done.

Link Posted: 9/7/2013 4:11:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/7/2013 5:50:31 PM EDT
It is a good feeling.
Link Posted: 9/7/2013 5:55:43 PM EDT
Numereous times I have been the only one with a knife or a flashlight etc...   You would think that this is common sense, however personal responsibilty is rare today.  

I have said it to a friend on mine once, "you know I got a plan for a zombie attack during an EMP event, do you think I have got a day hike covered?"
Link Posted: 9/7/2013 8:04:37 PM EDT
When my house was hit by an F2 tornado last January, we were the only family on our road able to live in their house (thanks log home). I sent my mom a picture of the damage and she spazzed out. My parents, and my father in law, both wanted us to go stay at their house. So, I invited them over for supper once the roads were cleared enough to drive down and we got the trees off the vehicles. Even though the power and water were out, we had a wonderful dinner from the propane range over lamp light. We even had the wood stove cranked up to keep the house warm since the temp dipped into the 30s that night. I went down to the creek and got water to flush the toilets. My wife really got on board with prepping after that incident. My father in law was even impressed, and that's saying something. It's comforting to have a plan.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 4:59:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Southernman077:
It's comforting to have a plan.
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This!

John

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 6:33:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bigvic:




Wrapping it up, let me say that I get it now.  A lot of knowledgeable people on this board always say be ready for situations that that are most likely to happen to you.  I will attest that they know what they are talking about.
View Quote
yes to all.



prepping is not about events that end life, its about living life as normal as possible



 
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 1:18:52 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
yes to all.

prepping is not about events that end life, its about living life as normal as possible, being prepared to handle as many contingencies as possible.
 
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:
Originally Posted By bigvic:

Wrapping it up, let me say that I get it now.  A lot of knowledgeable people on this board always say be ready for situations that that are most likely to happen to you.  I will attest that they know what they are talking about.
yes to all.

prepping is not about events that end life, its about living life as normal as possible, being prepared to handle as many contingencies as possible.
 


Fixed if for you.
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