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Posted: 9/6/2010 4:44:08 PM EDT
I haven't been able to do much fishing since spring here in MD ,due to the heat and low water. So it was finally nice to get back out this weekend with the cooler temps and higher flow on the Gunpowder River.







There were some sporadic caddis coming off, so I tied on a size 16 tan caddis, and it did the trick. I caught 6 fish in all, just little ones, but hey its better than nothing







Link Posted: 9/6/2010 4:54:41 PM EDT



i'm gonna get some nice sized browns from the bbq i had tonight. did you want me to take pictures?



seriously, nice little fish, i got some nice brook trout yesterday out of a cold mountain stream. used worms on a hook though.


Link Posted: 9/6/2010 6:36:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By grizzlyarms:



i'm gonna get some nice sized browns from the bbq i had tonight. did you want me to take pictures?




seriously, nice little fish, i got some nice brook trout yesterday out of a cold mountain stream. used worms on a hook though.




No thanks
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 4:20:09 PM EDT
Tisk, tisk trout on dry ground pics...... Well unless you kepth them....




That looks like a fun little stream. I bet it would be a blast to fish with a 0wt.


Link Posted: 9/7/2010 4:33:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Adder13:
Tisk, tisk trout on dry ground pics...... Well unless you kepth them....




That looks like a fun little stream. I bet it would be a blast to fish with a 0wt.




No I don't keep them, all catch and release here. I will have to make note of that for next time, I see how it could do harm to them.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 7:27:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 80thdiv313fa:
Originally Posted By Adder13:
Tisk, tisk trout on dry ground pics...... Well unless you kepth them....




That looks like a fun little stream. I bet it would be a blast to fish with a 0wt.




No I don't keep them, all catch and release here. I will have to make note of that for next time, I see how it could do harm to them.





Yea, I wasn't trying to come off like a dick or anything.............


Here is something I wrote on another forum:


It is a nice day you think to yourself as you stand in the water of your favorite trout stream. You pull some line off of your reel and send your fly towards its destination. After a short drift you see the tell tale rise and set the hook.


Then your rod comes to life as you battle this magnificent fish. After a little while you manage to get the fish in close enough to grab it. The fish fights back, so you increase your grip while fumbling around to get your camera.


This fish does not want to cooperate at all while you are getting your camera ready. You think to yourself “I need to get this pic because it might be the only fish I land today”. The whole time the fish is out of the water and he is starting to finally calm down. You snap a pic and put the fish back into the water and watch him swim away.


This scenario plays out on waters across the U.S. every day. I will be the first to admit that we are all guilty of mishandling our little friends from time to time. I wanted to take the time and help out the newer members to this wonderful sport understand a few things about proper trout handling.


From the moment you hook a fish and he begins to fight; lactic acid starts to build up in the fishes muscle tissue. A fish that is played too long can actually die from too much lactic acid build up. The additional stress of being removed from the water and held tight for the “shot” can be just enough to send the fish over the edge. Sure he might swim away, but he won’t survive.


Here are some of the basics every C&R trout fishermen should consider while out on the water.


· First off land the fish and send him on his way as quickly as possible. As already outlined, an over played fish can have a deadly build up of lactic acid.

· Make sure you help protect the tout’s slime coating as much as possible. Never grasp the fish in a towel, place it on the ground, ice, snow, rocks etc. This will damage the trout’s natural slime coat that protects the fish against disease amongst other things. Do not give the trout the “grip of death” in addition to removing excess slime you may also damage the fishes internal organs.

· When deciding if you want to take a picture or not have the camera ready prior to even hooking the fish. Personally I use a net and net the fish; while keeping the fish in the water I wet my hand to help protect the fishes slime coat. My camera is already ready around my neck and powered up. I quickly lift the fish and snap a pic. Then I immediately release the fish by cradling it my hand in the water facing upstream until he decides to swim away. Granted the shots don’t always come out great; however the pictures are secondary to the well being of the fish. You also do not need to take a pic of every fish you catch either.


When fishing with friends, they will typically have the camera ready. When I land a fish I count to three, lift the fish as they take the pic then I place the fish back into the water. When they catch a fish I do the same for them.
Good C&R tactics are essential to help protecting the waters that we love to fish. Granted if you are fishing a put and take system and you are keeping your fish for dinner then the basic tactics mentioned here don’t really apply.



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