Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 7/22/2008 3:11:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 3:12:50 PM EDT by bloodsport2885]
I've been meaning to get into storing water for any occurance I may need it for and I was wondering if anyone might have opinions on using some of the containers on the website below. Since they are designed to be used for lab purposes I believe they don't leech production chemicals or break down over time and would make perfect containers. Anybody use these for water storage? Also, what chemicals can be used to store water for long periods of time? I know of bleach but if your entire water supply has bleach in it wont there be a compounding effect that might shut down the kidneys?USPlastics

The site has any size, shape, or configuration you could need. I've bought many things from them to use as dispensers for grease, oil, and other gun items.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 4:08:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 4:10:50 PM EDT by JoseyWales]
Take it from a chemical engineer...you do NOT need lab grade plastics.

Lab grade plastics are made that way so that trace amounts of elements do not leach into samples and screw up the results (when very high sensitivity is needed and very low concentrations are being tested).

You are not doing scientific research, so the amount of metals or other compounds leaching into your water will have zero impact on you. There is more trace elements and organic matter (bacteria, chemicals, viruses, ect) in your potable drinking water than you will ever get out of an ordinary plastic jug.

The average drinking water sample has 40000 particles/mL of junk in it that are of 1 micron or larger. Your money would be better spent on a water purification system.

If you are really worried, rinse your jug with hot water and no-rise sanitizer (you can get it at a brew store). They you will be just fine.

If you were buying a 55 gallon drum, I would say definitely rinse it out with hot water and sanitizer. But most people just buy jugs and fill them up.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 4:15:42 PM EDT
Also would like to add that a 55 gallon drum is probably worth the money since you will spend less cash on shelving. Get a hand drum pump to pump the water out and be sure to seal one end with a push cap so that bacteria does not get into the water. IPA wipes are also your friend.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 4:33:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 4:35:36 PM EDT by bloodsport2885]

Originally Posted By JoseyWales:
Also would like to add that a 55 gallon drum is probably worth the money since you will spend less cash on shelving. Get a hand drum pump to pump the water out and be sure to seal one end with a push cap so that bacteria does not get into the water. IPA wipes are also your friend.


There are several models rated by the USDA and FDA for food storage as well as UV protection that don't break the wallet. I've never put much stock in plastic leech other than this water will be stored up to if not more than 6 months so I wasn't sure. I just assumed since the lab grade stuff was designed for delicate titration and solutions that it would be the safest. Since my work involves caustic chemicals stored in the drums you recommended I believe they would be perfect for storing something as neutral as water. Thanks for the info and guidance.

ETA do you mean potassium metabisulfate as the chem you get at brewing stores? I've used the stuff in wine but I wasn't totally sure if it would be strong enough to keep water for such a long period.
Top Top