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Posted: 9/3/2008 11:11:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2008 11:12:03 AM EST by DocGP]


This happens EVERY TIME we get inclement weather around here that downs power lines. I feel terrible for the families. Report is probably the generator. No more details released than that.

PLEASE BE CAREFUL!!!!

CO Poisoned officer

They can kill you.

Doc
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 11:37:24 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 12:28:16 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 12:36:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By Feral:
Sad story.

After seeing these kind of stories repeatedly, I've come around to the opinion that internal combustion engines meant for prolonged use have no place whatsoever inside a dwelling. Doesn't matter how good the ventilation seems to be, ICEs need to be outside or at least in a structure that has no connection whatsoever to living space.



Damn that's sad.

+1 to not running one of those things in any part of the house or attached garage or even right outside open windows. There is no defense for odorless gasses except thinking ahead and well placed CO detectors.

God bless the family in their time of need.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 12:44:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2008 12:44:42 PM EST by ireload]
Very sad to hear .

You can never have enough CO and smoke detectors around the house.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 3:18:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2008 3:20:48 PM EST by MNGuns]
I was just looking this morning at websites to see where the best place is to put my CO detector. Found out mine is currently in the worst possibleplace. Going to move it right now.


ETA...Done and batt checked.
Link Posted: 9/4/2008 4:47:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By MNGuns:
I was just looking this morning at websites to see where the best place is to put my CO detector. Found out mine is currently in the worst possibleplace. Going to move it right now.


ETA...Done and batt checked.


Forgive me MN, but where is the best recommended place??

Thanks
Doc

Link Posted: 9/4/2008 5:45:43 AM EST
Well, I would say near the bedroom. That is where you will spend the most of your time (get the most exposure) in your home and when you are most vulnerable...when you are sleeping...you just stay asleep. You could also argue that it should be near to CO emitting devices- stoves, gennys etc....I keep mine near the sleeping area of my home.
Link Posted: 9/4/2008 6:59:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/4/2008 7:02:33 AM EST by AC_Doctor]

Originally Posted By DocGP:
Forgive me MN, but where is the best recommended place??

Thanks
Doc




Right next to the return air grill in your bedroom. This tragedy should have been averted with a good CO detector. Remember the lifespan of a CO detector is only 5 years. Don't fcuk around with carbon monoxide. It is a PREVENTABLE danger if a quality CO detector is properly installed.

AC
Link Posted: 9/4/2008 7:06:49 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/4/2008 7:25:00 AM EST
A few years ago I saw a program- think it was located at Lake Meade- about boaters and CO poisoning.

The big houseboats have generators that exhaust near the transom- right where swimmers climb up and dive off. Apparently while paddling around they get a big dose.
Link Posted: 9/4/2008 7:47:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By Will:
Well, I would say near the bedroom. That is where you will spend the most of your time (get the most exposure) in your home and when you are most vulnerable...when you are sleeping...you just stay asleep. You could also argue that it should be near to CO emitting devices- stoves, gennys etc....I keep mine near the sleeping area of my home.
Good point. Since CO is colorless and odorless and is heavier than air, and will actually displace O2, I would put the detector near the floor near the bedrooms(mine is in the hallway and bedrooms), which is where you would get your first warnings that you have a problem. We had a former ARFCOM member & moderator Tim Green, aka Antiussa, nearly succumbed to CO2 poisoning due to a some defective heater system at his house. Remember you can get CO poisoning from defective fireplace chimineys(bird nests), water and heater vents.

Remember on a breezeless day, CO will just accumulate in a cloud around a generator, and even if the generator is outdoors, CO would leak back into your dwelling, so locate your genny well away from your dwelling.

If you or multiple members of your family experience flu like symptoms investigate CO problems.
Link Posted: 9/4/2008 8:20:09 PM EST
I hate hearing this. God Bless.
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