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Posted: 11/5/2016 6:09:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/5/2016 6:09:33 AM EST by Waldo]
What hoops do I have to jump through to install one? I'm mainly concerned with homeowners


This will be a small unit. My cabin has elec baseboard, propane, and wood stove for heat. Any one of them is sufficient to keep all but one room (essentially a sun room) warm. The sun room is 100% without heat, and I'd like to make it usable in the winter, as well as have the enjoyment of a fire.

It will likely be a very small inefficient used one....to be used twice a year. I'm in construction/engineering, so I can figure out code requirements and do the work, but what type of bullshit am I up against with my insurance as a joe schmoe installing one?

For the guys saying don't tell them.....I have 2 reasons for insurance on this place, fire and trees falling on it. Gotta keep state farm happy
Link Posted: 11/4/2016 6:42:53 PM EST
My insurance co. just asked if it was installed to code/spec. Told them yes. Said they might come out to inspect. Never showed up. Don't remember exact rate increase for stove. I know it was very minimal.

Call insurance co. Hope your experience is simple as mine.
Link Posted: 11/4/2016 7:00:28 PM EST
The specifications on your stove sheet should give you distances from walls, thickness of the hearth etc.

When I put mine in the state inspector told me stove instructions are gtg, the only thing that Idaho changed from my stove sheet was how far the hearth would extend from the feeding side/front.

Call the Department of Building Safety my experience was very good with getting all my questions answered.

Link Posted: 11/5/2016 5:59:23 AM EST
Thanks guys.


2 demerits to me for putting this in the wrong forum.

Mods, send me off to diy/home improvement please
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 6:17:13 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 6:22:42 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 7:09:54 AM EST
wood pellet
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 7:12:50 AM EST
There isn't much to it and like the other guy said, the instructions pretty much spell out the rules.

Where you install it will determine if you ever use it.
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 9:17:49 AM EST
Each different stove produces heat in different parts... therefore every stove is tested by UL or some other testing outfit to determine the same distance between varying parts of the stove and combustible surfaces. There are different types of stove pipes, different types of shielding etc that can all change those required clearances; that will be detailed in the installation directions/manual.

Some of the general codes that don't generally change are as follows.
Chimney height, there is a 3/2/10 rule, which means the chimney must extend at least 3 feet above the point that it penetrates the roof, and 2 feet above ANY part of the roof that is located within 10 feet to the side. So if you have a steep roof you may need 8 or 10 feet above the penetration point.
Class A chimney (dual wall stainless, insulated chimney) requires only 2" to combustibles, you must use compatible connectors etc when installing Class A (generally the manufacturer of your chosen class A chimney offers any connector that you could possibly want).
Hearth: all wood burning appliances require an ember protection (no combustibles) hearth that extends 8" to both sides and the rear of the appliance +16" to the front unless otherwise noted in the manual. Additionally, the R-value of the hearth required by your stove will be listed in the manual; some require ember protection only, others require insane r-values. IIRC when I installed mine I had to have an R-value just over 1 which required 3 layers of Dura-rock cement underlayment plus the tile...

In the end, hearth.com is the arfcom of wood-stoves and wood burning, they have LOTS of help articles, topics, photo galleries, plus a great forum...
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 12:47:08 PM EST
Follow the codes in your stove manual. A good stove company will provide a complete guide that will show you how your install must be done including what kind of pipe and chimney are required for your situation. Typically, your insurance Co will want to inspect it. As already mentioned Hearth.com has good info. Some governments have local codes that must be followed so you might want to check that also.
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 7:27:19 PM EST
Based on the responses, it sounds like an undocumented used one off craigslist isn't gonna fly.
Link Posted: 11/5/2016 7:36:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/5/2016 7:38:24 PM EST by 50-140]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lattimer:
Based on the responses, it sounds like an undocumented used one off craigslist isn't gonna fly.
View Quote
Sure it will, as long as you can find a name on the stove, you can get documentation on the webz, even if it's no longer made.

My wood stove is a Vermont Castings Defiant made in 1975 no longer made, I got all the specs. from the internet.

ETA, A call to the local building safety dept. will give you all the information on installation.
Link Posted: 11/8/2016 5:38:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By e-AR:
My insurance co. just asked if it was installed to code/spec. Told them yes. Said they might come out to inspect. Never showed up. Don't remember exact rate increase for stove. I know it was very minimal.

Call insurance co. Hope your experience is simple as mine.
View Quote

This. House had a wood furnace when we bought it. Ins wanted it cleaned and inspected.
Did an addition a dozen years ago and added a woodstove myself. Took lots of pics showing installation, clearances, etc.
Longtime agent came over and said it looked good to him ( before I stoned it all up)
Asked him if I could get that in writing and he said,
"sure".
Link Posted: 12/5/2016 5:39:31 PM EST
NECROPOST: How much does it usually cost in labor once you have all the parts needed for installing a wood stove?
Link Posted: 12/19/2016 12:10:59 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
NECROPOST: How much does it usually cost in labor once you have all the parts needed for installing a wood stove?
View Quote

That is very subjective. It depends one what stove is being installed, what your home needs to bring that install up to code, how much chimney is needed, local labor rates etc.

FWIW, I've never hired the install out; I've always done my own stove/fireplace installs myself.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 7:49:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/21/2016 7:49:42 PM EST by mevertsen]
We just had to send pictures to the insurance. That and the fact that it was installed by a commercial installer was good for them. I think it increased my insurance by about $40 a year. We also have propane for our "primary" heat source.
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