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Posted: 3/24/2014 5:23:53 AM EDT
Hello everyone.

I'm curious. If you had to pick one how-to book on survival for a beginner, what would it be?

I hope this isn't a dupe.

Thank you.
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 5:28:46 AM EDT
FM 21-76 US Army Survival Manual
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 5:37:24 AM EDT
This LDS manual is also available as a FREE pdf download!

LDS Preparedness Manual Print version
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 5:37:42 AM EDT
Beyond Collapse. Not just some collection of outdoor skills which most books are. Covers many topics, important topics, which other authors never consider.
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 5:56:36 AM EDT
One of the old edition Boy Scout Manuals !

http://www.troop97.net/bshb1.htm
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 6:17:27 AM EDT
The Encyclopedia of Country Living, 10th Edition
www.amazon.com
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 6:20:33 AM EDT
I like Cody Lundin's "When all Hell Breaks Loose".

Doc
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 7:38:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pastor_of_disaster:
Hello everyone.

I'm curious. If you had to pick one how-to book on survival for a beginner, what would it be?

I hope this isn't a dupe.

Thank you.
View Quote


What type of survival? Disaster survival? Wilderness survival?

I am going to have to second Doc. here and say the most interesting and well put together "survival" instructional and how to books are those of Cody Lundin.

If your looking at wilderness type survival go with his book 98.6 degrees.
http://www.codylundin.com/degrees.html

Disaster preparedness and survival: go with his other book when all hell breaks loose.
http://www.codylundin.com/Loose.html

While probably boring for an aspiring survivalist or seasoned prepper they are a very interesting tool that don't drone on with lists or quantities but rather suggests that these are some things you should have on hand, or this might be a good way to do this in a survival situation. No telling you to learn karate and stock X# of rounds for X caliber.

YMMV.
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 10:55:05 AM EDT
I appreciate the help!
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 12:52:18 PM EDT
Go to youtube and watch Wendy DeWitts 9 part video on home preparedness. It's not the high speed low drag ninja part of prepping that she addresses. It's the mindset and food part she advises on.
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 1:33:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2014 9:20:38 AM EDT by Powderfinger]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dablues:
One of the old edition Boy Scout Manuals !

http://www.troop97.net/bshb1.htm
View Quote

I used an early edition of the 7th printing on the road to Eagle Scout.
If you have never slept under the stars for a week, eating campfire cooked food after hiking miles into the wilderness (truly on your own with no cell reception), any 6th or 7th edition would be good to have on a shelf with several other books on different subjects.
A 60s version of Patrol Leader Handbook has some basic training too for leading a small group living out of doors.

ETA: OP- Lots of good suggestions here. Some assume you are not a "beginner" and that you know some basics. IMO, there is no 1 "best" book for a beginner. You need a whole shelf full. Books on first aid, dry gardening. putting up what you grow, securing a potable water source. non-hybrid seed propagation, animal husbandry, etc.
As far as the BSA handbook, it's full of usefull info. Some of it, more Boy Scout specific and not needed. Specific topic 1960-70s merit badge books on camping, cooking, hiking, first aid, lfesaving, safety, pioneering, archery (a newer version would have compound bow info), physical fitness, marksmanship, fishing, etc. are loaded with basic beginner info.
Good reading and if your AO is truly Jordan: Good Luck !
Link Posted: 3/24/2014 4:19:43 PM EDT
I'm not sure what kind of survival book you are looking for. If you are looking for outdoor survival there are all kinds of good books out there.

For practical survival homesteading type topics, look at books by Ragnar Benson. Very practical writer with none of the bullshit survival nonsense that is out there. He actually has real world survival homesteading experience in various parts of the world.

Live off the land in the city and country

The survival retreat

The modern survival retreat



Link Posted: 3/25/2014 8:13:11 AM EDT
Benson's Survivalist Medicine Chest has some good info. When medical care is not available, simple infections and wounds will take a big toll.
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 8:28:46 AM EDT
Lofty Wiseman's SAS Survival Manual. He taught the SAS SERE school for many years.
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 2:38:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2014 2:38:26 PM EDT by -FiveFiveSIx-]
This... book has everything you need.. Its not your typical survival book, its more or less a guide on how to live off the land, or with out modern amenities..
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 4:08:07 PM EDT
For the free LDS prep manual I had to go to www.ldsavow.com ....
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 5:14:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jte3470:
FM 21-76 US Army Survival Manual
View Quote



Seconded.
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 5:27:00 PM EDT
Get all the Ragnar Benson books you can find. Download PDF's and ebay. Great wisdom.

Here's a downloadable PDF...

Not for the politically correct and weak at heart... Benson

Link Posted: 3/25/2014 5:29:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2014 5:39:04 PM EDT by EXPY37]
All the survival downloads you could read in a LONG time.

Beware the EMP horseshit.


Downloads....


Refinement

http://modernsurvivalonline.com/survival-database-downloads/booksmanuals/



Link Posted: 3/25/2014 5:56:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2014 6:02:44 PM EDT by gODZOOKIE]
This obviously just encompasses one aspect of survival but IMO, this is a must have to any survival library- The Peterson Field Guide Series Edible Wild Plants. I happen to have the Eastern and central North America edition and have learned (and ate) a ton from it.

ETA- Jordan? then probably, never mind!
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 7:00:00 PM EDT
Patriots - Rawles

Link Posted: 3/25/2014 7:58:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jte3470:
FM 21-76 US Army Survival Manual
View Quote



This is a great book and you can find pdf's online.
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 7:59:10 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jte3470:
FM 21-76 US Army Survival Manual
View Quote



This is a great book and you can find free pdf's online.
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 8:20:26 PM EDT
"Camping and WoodCraft" by Horace Kephart, 1917
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 8:26:02 PM EDT
Dang! Now I got lots more reading to do.

Thanks for asking.
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 8:38:59 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DocGP:
I like Cody Lundin's "When all Hell Breaks Loose".

Doc
View Quote


THIS!!
Link Posted: 3/25/2014 8:56:42 PM EDT
There is no single book, you need a good library chock full of technical books.

That said, one of my favorite general reference books is "Back to Basics: How to Learn and Enjoy Traditional American Skills." An oldie but a goodie.

For vegetable gardening I'd recommend Steve Solomon's "Gardening When it Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times." For orcharding I like the University of California's "The Home Orchard." For livestock I'd recommend Storey's species-specific books, or "Barnyard in Your Backyard" for a general overview.

For medical stuff, my main reference is the AMA's "Family Medical Guide." I also like James Dukes' "The Green Pharmacy" (on herbalism).

For general food preservation, "Putting Food By" is hard to beat. For canning-specific information, the Ball Blue Book is the best.

Link Posted: 3/25/2014 9:30:01 PM EDT
http://www.amazon.com/Sergeant-Snow-Mario-Rigoni-Stern/dp/0810160552/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1395811619&sr=8-1&keywords=sergeant+in+the+snow


Sergeant in the Snow
Incredible story of what one man determined to survive can endure when tens of thousands
perish next to him..........

It's not about the gear, although the Breda HMG certainly served him well.........
Link Posted: 3/26/2014 4:37:49 AM EDT
98.6 Degrees, The Art Of Keeping Your Ass Alive. Cody Ludin.


Link Posted: 3/26/2014 9:19:18 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cathan91:
There is no single book, you need a good library chock full of technical books.

That said, one of my favorite general reference books is "Back to Basics: How to Learn and Enjoy Traditional American Skills." An oldie but a goodie.

For vegetable gardening I'd recommend Steve Solomon's "Gardening When it Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times." For orcharding I like the University of California's "The Home Orchard." For livestock I'd recommend Storey's species-specific books, or "Barnyard in Your Backyard" for a general overview.

For medical stuff, my main reference is the AMA's "Family Medical Guide." I also like James Dukes' "The Green Pharmacy" (on herbalism).

For general food preservation, "Putting Food By" is hard to beat. For canning-specific information, the Ball Blue Book is the best.

View Quote

That's one on my shelf, which I regard as "dry gardening" info. How are ancestors grew food before any one ever heard of a raised bed.
Link Posted: 3/26/2014 6:03:24 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:That's one on my shelf, which I regard as "dry gardening" info. How are ancestors grew food before any one ever heard of a raised bed.
View Quote

Solomon has an out of print book specifically on dry gardening. It's on his website, well worth reading.

My favorite book of his is definitely "Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades," but that's pretty regionally specific. When I first started out gardening that was my main go-to reference. It led me into a deep, deep rabbit hole, I ended up getting a horticulture degree and moving to the country to work on a farm. Still refer to Solomon's books on a regular basis.

Link Posted: 3/28/2014 9:53:14 AM EDT
I am glad someone recommended the book Back to Basics by Readers Digest. Yesterday I ordered a copy from ebay for $4.95 and free shipping! I could hardly believe that deal. It seems like it has alot of very positive reviews on Amazon and look forward to reading it
Link Posted: 3/28/2014 1:51:41 PM EDT
I grew up on Survival with Style, by Bradford Angier, so I'd have to say that one. Its original material from an original survivalist. Here's a good link to Bradford Angier if you want to read up.
Link Posted: 3/28/2014 3:13:15 PM EDT
For TEOTWAWKI I can't suggest any one book, as no one has lived through it. Since they're all speculation, read as many as you can, and draw your own conclusions. As for basic "survival", I like the SAS Survival Guide by John Wiseman.
Link Posted: 3/28/2014 4:55:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2014 4:58:43 PM EDT by IAMLEGEND]
Old Time Country Wisdom & Lore: 1000s of Traditional Skills for Simple Living

or

Life After Doomsday by Dr Bruce Clayton



If you think nuclear war is near...go with Life After Doomsday (although it is incredibly valuable for non-nuclear, non-radiological preps). Otherwise go with OTCW&L

Or, in ARFCOM fashion, GET BOTH!!!

Link Posted: 3/28/2014 5:07:35 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cathan91:
There is no single book, you need a good library chock full of technical books.

That said, one of my favorite general reference books is "Back to Basics: How to Learn and Enjoy Traditional American Skills." An oldie but a goodie.

For vegetable gardening I'd recommend Steve Solomon's "Gardening When it Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times." For orcharding I like the University of California's "The Home Orchard." For livestock I'd recommend Storey's species-specific books, or "Barnyard in Your Backyard" for a general overview.

For medical stuff, my main reference is the AMA's "Family Medical Guide." I also like James Dukes' "The Green Pharmacy" (on herbalism).

For general food preservation, "Putting Food By" is hard to beat. For canning-specific information, the Ball Blue Book is the best.

View Quote


Back to Basics is what started alot for me. Grew up with that book.

I would add Carol Deppe's Resilient Gardener for growing crops, Where the is no doctor for medical and The Encyclopedia of Country Living for homesteading.

For just general preparedness I like Arthur Bradleys Handbook for Practical Disaster Preparedness. It is what I get my friends who are just getting into prepping.
Link Posted: 3/29/2014 9:37:53 AM EDT
It looks like I've got a bit of reading to do!

Thank you.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 8:08:00 AM EDT
I can honestly say that this book is the best beginner book I have ever read.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/store/files/ss49.html

It really hits on all the basics and is simple to read and well done.

It is not a survival book but a book about preparedness.

I really hope you consider it.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 8:21:33 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tigermilk:
Lofty Wiseman's SAS Survival Manual. He taught the SAS SERE school for many years.
View Quote


This
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 10:52:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 10:53:08 AM EDT by zirkdog]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ssgbunny448:
For the free LDS prep manual I had to go to www.ldsavow.com ....
View Quote


The "Manual" is not an official church produced publication. It's compiled by a 3rd party LDS preparedness group.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:20:20 PM EDT
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