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Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
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Posted: 1/9/2014 11:42:16 AM EDT
I'm stuck in my dorm room all day today (Work as an RA for the university, and I'm on lockdown for new students arriving.) Netflix is boring, so I repacked my GHB, and took pictures.

My theory is that it's very unlikely I'll ever need to run for the hills in Central VA, but I can see my truck breaking down, or needing to Jack Bauer it up when riots start at school . So my bag is designed to let me get through 24 hours of small scale SHTF.

Here's my bag. It's a US Peacekeeper Rapid Deployment Pack. I really like it. Attached to the strap is a ESEE 4. The pack sits on my weak side, to keep from interfering with my pistol on my strong side.



First pouch



And here's what inside: A Benchmade Griptillian Tanto, and a Surefire G2



Next pouch



Two 1911 mags loaded with Winchester Silvertips, and two range mags loaded with Winchester White Box



Pouch number three



One CAT



Last pouch on the outside of the bag



A multitool, compass, ear pro, and a sharpie and a pen



Inside the bag



First aid kit, zip ties, hand warmers, $60 in fives and ones, gloves, a power bar, and a survival kit.



Inside the water bottle. I'm super paranoid about being able to start a fire. I've got a space blanket, water bottle, about eight feet of duct tape wrapped around the water bottle, MRE matches, flint and steel, BIC lighter, water purification tablets, wetfire tabs, a candle, a bandana, and 15 feet of 550 cord.



And here's everything in the bag



I don't keep the firearm in the bag, but on my strong side, I have this:



Any suggestions? I'm going to add an Izzy bandage to the FAK, and someday I'm going to get the Katydyn micropure tabs to replace the big nasty iodine tabs I have for water purification. But any other ideas?
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:10:45 PM EDT
[#1]
I would carry the folder on my person as part of my EDC. Do you have room for a small tarp or poncho for the rain? I'd also add another powerbar or two. Maybe keep a bottle of water on hand too. Also isn't having the gat on campus verboten?
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:11:41 PM EDT
[#2]
Looks goood. Heavy on weapons, light on hydration and foods. Get a water straw purifier and at least one mre or equivalent. my .02
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:16:45 PM EDT
[#3]
Well, the biggest problem you have is your water bottle is empty from the go
Seriosuly, if you ever had to walk long distances for real, you'd trade 90% of the stuff you have there for water in no time. I'd get at the very least one liter, make that two for any half way serious distance walked under the sun. The first aid kit might be ok but what do you have in it?
Gun, MT, water and money is usually enough to get you back home. Maybe a bit more money, think renting a car, hotel room while they are not accepting credit cards.
How much would you have to walk to get back home?
FerFAL
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:28:34 PM EDT
[#4]
Nice ESSE!  Upgrade the 1 hour @ 65 lumens G2 light.   Nitecore P16 specs:



Add at least some extra batteries and some more cash.   Local map?   Spare credit card.  Write in the rain notepad.
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:34:59 PM EDT
[#5]
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Quoted:
The first aid kit might be ok but what do you have in it?
FerFAL
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Quoted:
The first aid kit might be ok but what do you have in it?
FerFAL


One roll of Kerlex, one 4x6 surgical gauze pad, a pair of gloves, a roll of medical tape, a couple of band-aids, some moleskin, and some butterflys. If it gets really hairy, I have a USGI IFAK in the car, which sits next to my "Roll up on an accident" first aid kit. My GHB and Car FAK sit right next to each other.

Quoted:
How much would you have to walk to get back home?
FerFAL


Max, probably about 30 miles. Anything further than that I'll have more stuff in the car because I'm traveling.

Quoted:
I would carry the folder on my person as part of my EDC. Do you have room for a small tarp or poncho for the rain? I'd also add another powerbar or two. Maybe keep a bottle of water on hand too. Also isn't having the gat on campus verboten?


I have another folder as EDC, and my campus permits CCW.

Everyone is suggesting I add water. How often should I rotate the bottle I'm going to add?
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:53:06 PM EDT
[#6]
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Quoted:


One roll of Kerlex, one 4x6 surgical gauze pad, a pair of gloves, a roll of medical tape, a couple of band-aids, some moleskin, and some butterflys. If it gets really hairy, I have a USGI IFAK in the car, which sits next to my "Roll up on an accident" first aid kit. My GHB and Car FAK sit right next to each other.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
The first aid kit might be ok but what do you have in it?
FerFAL


One roll of Kerlex, one 4x6 surgical gauze pad, a pair of gloves, a roll of medical tape, a couple of band-aids, some moleskin, and some butterflys. If it gets really hairy, I have a USGI IFAK in the car, which sits next to my "Roll up on an accident" first aid kit. My GHB and Car FAK sit right next to each other.

Ok, you might want to add some ibuprofen and 3 in 1 Antibiotic Ointment in there as well. I would suggest also some diarrhea tablets as well just in case.
Do you have a water filter?
At least get one of those survival straws such as lifestraw. You'll really appreciate it when sucking from some muddy puddle of water.

Quoted:
How much would you have to walk to get back home?
FerFAL


Max, probably about 30 miles. Anything further than that I'll have more stuff in the car because I'm traveling.

30 miles is no joke so at least a liter of water and the straw filter.

Water shouldnt go bad but the plastic taste isnt nice. Rotating once a year is fine for plastic. On a stainless steel bottle it lasts forever. I like stainless steel bottles because they are tough and you can actually cook some food in them. Make some noodles or soup, clean it up and refill with water. I have a slightly flattened spoon that fight nicely in the wide mouth of my stainless steel waterbottles.

FerFAL
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 12:58:21 PM EDT
[#7]
I would put some more food in there, and maybe a way to boil some water.

A plastic painters tarp would be nice too if you are hoofing it and suddenly get caught in a storm.
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 2:14:05 PM EDT
[#8]
Just a few quick observations. Good on you for putting together a small kit BTW.

Add a plastic poncho at minimum.

No water?! Switch that plastic bottle for a stainless one.

I would switch the crappy plastic pen for a Zebra F-701. Now you have a pen and an improvised strike tool.

Switch the sharpie for a mini to save space and weight.

Do you know how to use that compass? Just curious. Maybe add a small map of your AO? Maybe some Pace Beads?

I would switch that power bar for a more calorie dense option such as a lifeboat type ration.

That flashlight is ok, but there are much better options with much better battery life. Smaller/lighter too. May want to consider a headlamp instead.

I would add some quarters to your $$ stash.

Have to admit I'm torn on the inclusion of the TQ. If you know how to use it fine, but you are very limited on space. Your call.

Be cautious with your FAK as that ziplock is not waterproof. water will ruin some of those items.

Good luck. Just thinking about what you need to do to prepare yourself puts you way ahead of many people around you, enjoy the journey.

Bear
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 2:34:12 PM EDT
[#9]
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Quoted:
Add a plastic poncho at minimum.
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Quoted:
Add a plastic poncho at minimum.


I have an actual rain shell that stays in my EDC book bag, but I'll look for a cheap plastic poncho.

Quoted:
Do you know how to use that compass? Just curious. Maybe add a small map of your AO? Maybe some Pace Beads?


Eagle Scout, and taught the Orienteering Merit Badge

Quoted:
Have to admit I'm torn on the inclusion of the TQ. If you know how to use it fine, but you are very limited on space. Your call.


Used to be an EMT-B, and had plenty of .mill friends show me how to use one one handed. I figure my FAK is going to be used for one of two things, small cuts and scrapes, or wounds that involve copious amounts of blood. So I've got the TQ for big stuff, and the smaller FAK for the cuts and scrapes.
Link Posted: 1/9/2014 4:01:33 PM EDT
[#10]
OK, going to try to do this without sounding like too much of a dick...

I do not see a plan. What I see is a very compact BOB - a GHB, really - that has lots of "check the box" items, but I don't see anything about what you plan on doing with it, or why you have it.

You have a truck. If this is a BOB, then what situation has you utilizing this instead of your truck? And if you *don't* have your truck, is this enough? You mentioned a 30 mile trip. That's likely nothing in a truck, but on foot - and I don't care how young or in shape you are - that is easily a multi-day trek, especially after Mr. Murphy has his say. Is there any particular reason why you can't carry a pack? They are much easier to carry over long distances than a slung bag.

Where are you going? By foot or truck? How far? What is the terrain like? Are you sticking to roads or avoiding them? Direct path or indirect? Do you have alternate BOLs? Alternate routes?

Develop your plan first, and then build your preps around that plan.  Make the gear fit the mission, don't try to rationalize yourself into buying gear to create one. Also, once you realize that you'll almost certainly be driving (which you will at some point) you will likely adjust to reflect that.

Flesh out your plans and then adjust your gear. All of the gear you have is useful. Spend time thinking about what you will actually use and why, and exclude unnecessary gear. Your BOB 1.0 is going to look ALOT different than later versions.

I applaud you for getting into this early - you are way ahead of your peers. Understand that it is a learning process, and adjustment is good.
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 10:00:21 AM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
OK, going to try to do this without sounding like too much of a dick...

I do not see a plan. What I see is a very compact BOB - a GHB, really - that has lots of "check the box" items, but I don't see anything about what you plan on doing with it, or why you have it.

You have a truck. If this is a BOB, then what situation has you utilizing this instead of your truck? And if you *don't* have your truck, is this enough? You mentioned a 30 mile trip. That's likely nothing in a truck, but on foot - and I don't care how young or in shape you are - that is easily a multi-day trek, especially after Mr. Murphy has his say. Is there any particular reason why you can't carry a pack? They are much easier to carry over long distances than a slung bag.

Where are you going? By foot or truck? How far? What is the terrain like? Are you sticking to roads or avoiding them? Direct path or indirect? Do you have alternate BOLs? Alternate routes?

Develop your plan first, and then build your preps around that plan.  Make the gear fit the mission, don't try to rationalize yourself into buying gear to create one. Also, once you realize that you'll almost certainly be driving (which you will at some point) you will likely adjust to reflect that.

Flesh out your plans and then adjust your gear. All of the gear you have is useful. Spend time thinking about what you will actually use and why, and exclude unnecessary gear. Your BOB 1.0 is going to look ALOT different than later versions.

I applaud you for getting into this early - you are way ahead of your peers. Understand that it is a learning process, and adjustment is good.
View Quote


It could easily turn into a two day trip if things go wrong, such as very bad weather or getting wounded/being sick, but a healthy adult should cover 30 miles in less than 24 hours.
You have an average walking speed of 3 mph give or take. I'm asuming here he's talking about 30 miles road and not some more complicated hiking trail.  As I said before 30 miles is no joke, especially as you say when Murhpy pays you a visit, but I'd focus on keep walking and getting home ASAP.
I wouldnt go beyond a couple power bars in terms of food, water being clealry the priority for such a distance. I wouldnt have any stove, pots and such, that's just weight you dont need if you are looking at some emergecny taking place and you having to walk 30 miles home.
FerFAL
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 11:35:16 AM EDT
[#12]
I agree with the life straw, and to add a bit more food in dried or protein bars. Otherwise nice light bag to move with.
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 12:14:34 PM EDT
[#13]
I'm a total noob to this stuff.  What little I have is still sitting in the packages and not organized, so I have little authority to chime in here.

...that being said... how about something simple like TP?  I know that's a 'comfort' item when SHTF, but in high stress situations, I tend to need a LOT!!!
Next time your roll at home gets down around 1/4" to 1/2", pull it off, flatten out the roll and put it in a sandwich bag.  We did this for a while and I'd slip one in my pocket each day when we were touring Europe.  In some places they provide little/none, or its like waxed paper.

Anyway, as another poster said, after a while you'd trade a lot of whatever for the one item you wish you'd brought.

I'm TOTALLY impressed with your forethought at such a young age, and your carry piece is GORGEOUS!!!
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 2:50:42 PM EDT
[#14]
Didn't see a fire making tool, Def. water needs to be added.

Also maybe a personal 1st Aid kit.

Def. A Head lamp as well

I also adjust mine for weather. Have a winter bag now.
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 3:45:59 PM EDT
[#15]
I would honestly ditch the 1911 or at least get some Wilson Combat mags for it and why don't you have all hollow points? How sure are you that that ammo functions in your 1911?

Get a Glock 17 or 21 if you want to stay .45ACP.


Things to consider:
Toilet paper/kleenex

Lifestraw

Spare Socks

Spare Underwear


Also what is your boot situation? Good boots are KEY, make sure they fit and are plenty comfortable. Don't skimp here, get some nice boots from Danner. One final thought, the pack is nice but a two strap backpack is going to be far more comfortable. YMMV

Just suggestions, don't take anything personally if you don't agree in the end it's all up to you.
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 3:58:08 PM EDT
[#16]
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Quoted:


It could easily turn into a two day trip if things go wrong, such as very bad weather or getting wounded/being sick, but a healthy adult should cover 30 miles in less than 24 hours.
You have an average walking speed of 3 mph give or take. I'm asuming here he's talking about 30 miles road and not some more complicated hiking trail.  As I said before 30 miles is no joke, especially as you say when Murhpy pays you a visit, but I'd focus on keep walking and getting home ASAP.
I wouldnt go beyond a couple power bars in terms of food, water being clealry the priority for such a distance. I wouldnt have any stove, pots and such, that's just weight you dont need if you are looking at some emergecny taking place and you having to walk 30 miles home.
FerFAL
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Quoted:
Quoted:
OK, going to try to do this without sounding like too much of a dick...

I do not see a plan. What I see is a very compact BOB - a GHB, really - that has lots of "check the box" items, but I don't see anything about what you plan on doing with it, or why you have it.

You have a truck. If this is a BOB, then what situation has you utilizing this instead of your truck? And if you *don't* have your truck, is this enough? You mentioned a 30 mile trip. That's likely nothing in a truck, but on foot - and I don't care how young or in shape you are - that is easily a multi-day trek, especially after Mr. Murphy has his say. Is there any particular reason why you can't carry a pack? They are much easier to carry over long distances than a slung bag.

Where are you going? By foot or truck? How far? What is the terrain like? Are you sticking to roads or avoiding them? Direct path or indirect? Do you have alternate BOLs? Alternate routes?

Develop your plan first, and then build your preps around that plan.  Make the gear fit the mission, don't try to rationalize yourself into buying gear to create one. Also, once you realize that you'll almost certainly be driving (which you will at some point) you will likely adjust to reflect that.

Flesh out your plans and then adjust your gear. All of the gear you have is useful. Spend time thinking about what you will actually use and why, and exclude unnecessary gear. Your BOB 1.0 is going to look ALOT different than later versions.

I applaud you for getting into this early - you are way ahead of your peers. Understand that it is a learning process, and adjustment is good.


It could easily turn into a two day trip if things go wrong, such as very bad weather or getting wounded/being sick, but a healthy adult should cover 30 miles in less than 24 hours.
You have an average walking speed of 3 mph give or take. I'm asuming here he's talking about 30 miles road and not some more complicated hiking trail.  As I said before 30 miles is no joke, especially as you say when Murhpy pays you a visit, but I'd focus on keep walking and getting home ASAP.
I wouldnt go beyond a couple power bars in terms of food, water being clealry the priority for such a distance. I wouldnt have any stove, pots and such, that's just weight you dont need if you are looking at some emergecny taking place and you having to walk 30 miles home.
FerFAL


I am going to have to respectfully disagree. While it's entirely *possible* to cover 30 miles on foot in a 24 hour period, for the vast, vast majority of people walking this earth right now (or at least those of us in the pampered West) it's not remotely realistic. For most people, even making 20 miles would be quite an accomplishment. And for quite a few people - probably still majority - even making 10 miles in a day would be optimistic. Hell, even when I was in the military a 20 mile ruck - for top-shape youngsters - was grueling, and something you wouldn't want to extend. (yes, I know, no ruck here - but we were conditioned for it and 20 miles was still a PITA)

Unless he lives in a flat desert, there will be hills. Walking downhill is great, walking uphill takes alot out of you. You can consider an average walking speed of 3mph, but realistically it is unlikely most people would keep that pace. Terrain and events will slow things down. And we are not robots, we have to slow down, we have to stop and rest, we have to eat, we have to sleep when beating ourselves up like this over long distances under stress.

People have a very strong tendency to overestimate their capabilities when discussing treks like these. Plan for worst case. Best case, you can make that trek in a day and a half or 2 days. More realistic - knowing nothing about the terrain OP is facing - would be 3-4 days. Possibly even more depending upon conditions.

And you will need ALOT of water to make it those 30 miles on foot. I am in agreement with FerFal on that, and yeah, power bars should do the trick for that distance. More than one, though...

ETA: and to OP, if you doubt me, ask yourself this: If you walked out of the door right now with what you have for a BOB, are you confident you'd be able to make that 30-mile hump within a day - or even two? Be honest with yourself. If you think that you can, then I challenge you to put yourself to the test and do it (please, please put some safeguards in place if you do test yourself). If you're not confident that you could do it right now with what you have, then adjustments need to be made.

If you test yourself and find you can do it then awesome, and drive on with what you've got. But if not, then it's time to rethink things.
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 7:37:29 PM EDT
[#17]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
OK, going to try to do this without sounding like too much of a dick...

I do not see a plan. What I see is a very compact BOB - a GHB, really - that has lots of "check the box" items, but I don't see anything about what you plan on doing with it, or why you have it.

You have a truck. If this is a BOB, then what situation has you utilizing this instead of your truck? And if you *don't* have your truck, is this enough? You mentioned a 30 mile trip. That's likely nothing in a truck, but on foot - and I don't care how young or in shape you are - that is easily a multi-day trek, especially after Mr. Murphy has his say. Is there any particular reason why you can't carry a pack? They are much easier to carry over long distances than a slung bag.

Where are you going? By foot or truck? How far? What is the terrain like? Are you sticking to roads or avoiding them? Direct path or indirect? Do you have alternate BOLs? Alternate routes?

Develop your plan first, and then build your preps around that plan.  Make the gear fit the mission, don't try to rationalize yourself into buying gear to create one. Also, once you realize that you'll almost certainly be driving (which you will at some point) you will likely adjust to reflect that.
.
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Quoted:
OK, going to try to do this without sounding like too much of a dick...

I do not see a plan. What I see is a very compact BOB - a GHB, really - that has lots of "check the box" items, but I don't see anything about what you plan on doing with it, or why you have it.

You have a truck. If this is a BOB, then what situation has you utilizing this instead of your truck? And if you *don't* have your truck, is this enough? You mentioned a 30 mile trip. That's likely nothing in a truck, but on foot - and I don't care how young or in shape you are - that is easily a multi-day trek, especially after Mr. Murphy has his say. Is there any particular reason why you can't carry a pack? They are much easier to carry over long distances than a slung bag.

Where are you going? By foot or truck? How far? What is the terrain like? Are you sticking to roads or avoiding them? Direct path or indirect? Do you have alternate BOLs? Alternate routes?

Develop your plan first, and then build your preps around that plan.  Make the gear fit the mission, don't try to rationalize yourself into buying gear to create one. Also, once you realize that you'll almost certainly be driving (which you will at some point) you will likely adjust to reflect that.
.


Not dickish at all! I appreciate the feedback. My mindset with this bag is needing to A: walk out a breakdown, as I travel in areas that are semi-rural, or B: allow me to function for the first 24 hours of a SHFT event while I get to larger preps and eventually my BOL.

Quoted:
ETA: and to OP, if you doubt me, ask yourself this: If you walked out of the door right now with what you have for a BOB, are you confident you'd be able to make that 30-mile hump within a day - or even two? Be honest with yourself. If you think that you can, then I challenge you to put yourself to the test and do it (please, please put some safeguards in place if you do test yourself). If you're not confident that you could do it right now with what you have, then adjustments need to be made.

If you test yourself and find you can do it then awesome, and drive on with what you've got. But if not, then it's time to rethink things.


I did 22 miles on the AT with a 30 pound pack in 9.5 hours, and I'm an avid backpacker. I'm confidant in my ability to walk 30 miles, and that's at the upper edge of my AO. Most of my travel keeps me within 15-25 miles of the University, which I know I can do in a single long day.

Quoted:
I would honestly ditch the 1911 or at least get some Wilson Combat mags for it and why don't you have all hollow points? How sure are you that that ammo functions in your 1911?


I have Chip McCormack Powermags on my belt, and my 1911 is my EDC CCW. And the Silver tips are my SD Ammo. I've put one of my two boxes through the 1911 to make sure they feed and shoot fine. I'm working on getting a box of Winchester Ranger SXT's, but right now the silver tips are OK. And the reason why I only have two mags of HP, is because the other three mags full are on my belt. The two FMJ mags are my range use mags, but I figure if I'm going to keep them loaded and in the truck, I might as well put them in my GHB.

Quoted:
Also what is your boot situation? Good boots are KEY, make sure they fit and are plenty comfortable. Don't skimp here, get some nice boots from Danner. One final thought, the pack is nice but a two strap backpack is going to be far more comfortable. YMMV


I work at an outdoor specialty store, so I'm always in some form of boot/trail shoe. In the winter it's a pair of Scarpa Kailishes, which have about 300 miles on them, and in the summer it's a pair of Inov-8 Terrock 330's, both of which I've spent multiple days hiking in. I'm usually dressed in technical gear due to the nature of my job, and my natural fashion sense, so I almost always have a packlite jacket, trail footwear, and synthetic clothing on. About the only "non-technical" clothing I wear are my jeans.
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 7:40:43 PM EDT
[#18]
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Quoted:
I'm TOTALLY impressed with your forethought at such a young age, and your carry piece is GORGEOUS!!!
View Quote


It was a combination 21st birthday/graduation/Christmas gift from my father. Novack's assembled Wilson Combat 1911. It is my very favorite pistol

However, I am looking for something smaller and cheaper to prevent this from ending up in an evidence locker if I ever need to actually use it.....
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 7:45:25 PM EDT
[#19]
Disposable poncho, and a particle mask. Maybe eye pro of some type. Weapons should never be in plain sight.        
 
Link Posted: 1/10/2014 8:14:47 PM EDT
[#20]
Not dickish at all! I appreciate the feedback. My mindset with this bag is needing to A: walk out a breakdown, as I travel in areas that are semi-rural, or B: allow me to function for the first 24 hours of a SHFT event while I get to larger preps and eventually my BOL.
View Quote


In the first 24 hours of a SHTF event the most important question you will need to deal with is whether to leave or stay put. BI or BO. If your immediate security is not compromised, then you should probably stay put. If there are violent Rodney King-like riots impending, then by all means GTFO before they arrive in your area. Otherwise, stay put.

You mention "walk out a breakdown", what do you mean by that? What scenario causes such a breakdown? How realistic is that?

What are some more realistic scenarios you might have to deal with? You have limited resources, obviously. You need to put them to best use. Plan for the most likely events first.

Having the health to make that long trek is awesome, enjoy it while it lasts! Having the sort of stamina it takes to do the AT or reliably hike long distances is definitely an asset. But that doesn't necessarily mean that that is a wise course of action.

What are your food and water stores like? You're in school (dorms, I guess, if you're an RA), so I'm guessing limited. But it's really not hard at all to have a few days' worth at least saved up. In most situations you'd be best served staying put short-term, while maintaining the ability to take off if situation dictates. Keep the truck above a half tank, to that end...

Walking to your BOL should be your LAST resort, no matter how good shape you are in. BI first. Drive away second. Walking is last.
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 5:56:00 AM EDT
[#21]
Extra socks and a lifestraw.  maybe moleskin and sunscreen or Goldbond?
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 12:11:45 PM EDT
[#22]
Maybe a few more feet of 500 cord.

If you try to span betweent two posts for say a shelter. you'll find that 550 cord runs out fast when you add in wraps and knots.
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 2:56:39 PM EDT
[#23]
I would echo a life straw and poncho, and also consider adding a dimmer light of sorts.  Something more for navigation that isn't as bright as the surefire, or a dual mode light.
Link Posted: 1/12/2014 11:02:35 AM EDT
[#24]
With the exception of NO WATER, it's not a bad light-duty/General Purpose kit.

I''ll also jump on the poncho bandwagon.  They don't take up much space.
If this is a walking kit, do you want to have the 4in fixed blade knife showcased to the world?
Link Posted: 1/12/2014 2:00:25 PM EDT
[#25]

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Quoted:


I'm a total noob to this stuff.  What little I have is still sitting in the packages and not organized, so I have little authority to chime in here.



...that being said... how about something simple like TP?  I know that's a 'comfort' item when SHTF, but in high stress situations, I tend to need a LOT!!!

Next time your roll at home gets down around 1/4" to 1/2", pull it off, flatten out the roll and put it in a sandwich bag.  We did this for a while and I'd slip one in my pocket each day when we were touring Europe.  In some places they provide little/none, or its like waxed paper.



Anyway, as another poster said, after a while you'd trade a lot of whatever for the one item you wish you'd brought.



I'm TOTALLY impressed with your forethought at such a young age, and your carry piece is GORGEOUS!!!
View Quote
I have a dedicated roll in my bag, but it is a shame how often hygiene items are last on the list or left off all together. I also add one of the 99 cent packs of baby wipes. mostly for getting hands cleaner when eating. But also for their intended use.

 
Link Posted: 1/12/2014 3:40:49 PM EDT
[#26]
I personally would add another tourniquet new army standard calls for 2. 1 for a hasty and the other for deliberate.
Link Posted: 1/12/2014 4:00:31 PM EDT
[#27]
I would add bug spray and sun screen.
Link Posted: 1/12/2014 11:11:08 PM EDT
[#28]
WET FIRE has a shelf life. I was unaware of this as are many other people. Mine lasted 3-4 years before turning into a Styrofoam brick that would not burn even under a lighter. In extreme circumstances this will get you killed. I do not believe they belong in survival kit.
Link Posted: 1/13/2014 2:44:24 AM EDT
[#29]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
WET FIRE has a shelf life. I was unaware of this as are many other people. Mine lasted 3-4 years before turning into a Styrofoam brick that would not burn even under a lighter. In extreme circumstances this will get you killed. I do not believe they belong in survival kit.
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Wet fire isnt very good based on what I've seen.
Hammaro paper on the other hand that great stuff. Light, compact, flat, burns nice and catches a spark very easily.
FerFAL
Link Posted: 1/13/2014 3:26:26 PM EDT
[#30]
A few years ago I put together a pocket survival kit designed to fit in a cargo pocket (like in BDUs or 5.11's). Not exactly what you're doing but for the sake of keeping things small it might give you a few ideas. I've lost the link to the original thread, so a few pics...











This one was geared more towards wilderness survival situations, but some of the stuff might be similar to what you're looking for. And I'd agree with the previous posters that the Wetfire is not that impressive, BTW - you'd be better off making your own cotton ball / vaseline tinders, I think.

I will say that I REALLY like the Aquapouch. it's very tough, holds up well, and takes up almost no actual space, as opposed to a hard container.
Link Posted: 1/13/2014 4:19:48 PM EDT
[#31]
Link Posted: 1/13/2014 6:08:24 PM EDT
[#32]
You have inspired me to redo my GHB. Thinking of what I have in there, there are too many duplicates of some things that have found their way in there.
Link Posted: 1/14/2014 12:04:20 AM EDT
[#33]
I am what you would call a knife guy but I actually think you are a little heavy on the cutting tools. Its a GHB not a wander through the forest doing some bushcraft bag. A folder in your pocket would be more than enough and easier to conceal. I EDC a Leatherman Wave on a pocket clip.

You need to upgrade that G2 to LED if you haven't already. It will be much brighter and last a lot longer. Do you have spare batteries? You should consider a headlamp as well.

Get rid of those MRE matches. They suck. A Bic lighter, ferro rod and some tinder in a zip-loc is all you need. Both Lowes and Walmart sell grill firestater cubes that are the same thing as the Wetfire brand but for a lot less money. Look in the grilling section.

Unless you just shoot the 1911 best a higher capacity plastic gun would be a better choice as a GHB gun. I have a older Glock 22 w/ 2 spare mags in my Jumbo Versipack. Just the other day my older brother told me about the 19+1 9mm XDM! If I was needing another full sized handgun I would be all over that.

I keep a 1L $0.99 gas station bottled water in the side pouch of my Versipack instead of a Nalgene. That way I have fresh clean tasting water instead of rank plastic tasting water I put in a Nalgene 3 weeks ago. Tincture of Iodine can be used for treating water and should be in your FAK. You can find aluminum and stainless cups with folding handles that nest with a Nalgene size bottle so you have the ability to boil. The Powerbar Protien Plus bars are what you want to have in that bag. Some caffeine pills and 5 hour energy would be good as well.

I wouldn't take up too much room in your bag with a big useless FAK. Band-aids and Neosporin belong in a soccer-moms purse. Duct tape, clean bandana and Tincture of Iodine(all multi-purpose items) will take care of most minor injuries.

I would throw a plastic poncho in there and maybe a insulating layer if you can fit it. I have a down jacket I can stuff into a Nalgene and doesn't weigh much more than one either. Believe it or not I actually got it at Walmart for $30. Its being sold under the brand name Royal Falcon or something like that.

Joseph
Link Posted: 1/14/2014 7:47:52 AM EDT
[#34]
Quoted:
I have an actual rain shell that stays in my EDC book bag, but I'll look for a cheap plastic poncho...
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Quoted:
If it gets really hairy, I have a USGI IFAK in the car, which sits next to my "Roll up on an accident" first aid kit...  
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My understanding of the GHB concept is that it is one bag, along with the EDC items you keep on your belt or in your pockets.
 
Is the deployment pack you have pictured something that is additional to your EDC bookbag?  If it is, I think you should include the relevant contents of your bookbag and whatever else you intend to add to the deployment pack, or not count them at all.  For emergency purposes, I think it's more helpful to not include anything that isn't kept in or attached to the GHB.

It sounds to me like you need a larger bag - maybe re-purpose the deployment pack as a grab bag for your weapon; gun, mags, IFAK.  I'm a big fan of the Grey Man concept, which is another reason I think a backpack would be good.  That deployment pack will stick out like a sore thumb, especially with that big knife hanging from it.

There are a lot of good suggestions so far.  I'd agree that 30 miles is a serious distance on foot, in emergency conditions - you may be able to cover it in 24 hrs now, but there's no telling what kind of conditions are going to slow you down in a bug-out situation.  Prepare for an overnighter with some kind of shelter; Sil Tarp, bivvy, poncho system, etc.

+1 don't include anything for cooking - the Power Bar is a good idea, maybe one or two more for comfort if you have the room.  You could actually do it with no food, of course, but I wouldn't want to.
+1 carrying water, and I'd switch out the WalMart bottle for a Nalgene; better quality container and you can see what you're drinking.  Alternatively, use the Nalgene as a dry container and carry bottled water.  If you're keeping water in the Nalgene it gets stale after a week or two - bottled water lasts longer but then you're taking up more space.
+1 TP and Wet Ones
+1 Eye pro - I like the 3M ANSI-approved sunglasses sold at Lowes
+1 particle mask or filtering face piece.  The challenge with those is keeping them from getting beat up and deformed inside of your pack.  A bandanna can be used instead, but offers more comfort than protection.
+1 more paracord - I keep mine in 50' sections.  It's one of the items I use most frequently out of my bag, so I think it's worth it to keep more.
+1 for a headlamp - Petzl is worth the investment.  Absolutely invaluable if you're walking at night.  Having both hands free is a huge advantage.

I strongly disagree with the folks suggesting a cheap plastic poncho.  I'd carry a heavy-mil 50g garbage bag before I packed one of those; it would take up the same space and have more uses.  The $0.99 ponchos tear too easily, blow to pieces in the wind, and soak your legs with run-off.  If you already have a rain shell, I'd suggest getting a pair of rain pants.  Frogg Toggs for a bargain, North Face, Columbia, or similar if you can afford them.

It's quite an advantage that you're wearing quality synthetic, technical clothing.  If you usually wear jeans, I'd add a pair of synthetic or poly-blend pants to your kit.  Wet jeans are miserable.

Suggestions aside, you can be certain that your training and the preparations you've already made put you light years ahead of the vast majority of your neighbors.
Link Posted: 1/14/2014 8:12:53 AM EDT
[#35]
good kit:

I would add

Hat
Lifestraw + Full bottle or 2 of water
More food(even power bars, peanuts, or jerky)
Powdered energy drink
Convert some of that cash to quarters ($10?)
Change of socks
Map Book (or photocopied pages) of your main travel areas
A large black trash bag (Contractor bags are perfect for almost no weight)

I know it adds weight and bulk but every bag/kit I have has a small hatchet. Even if you dropped on of the 3 knives you have in there now to save some of that weight. I just can't find a reason to not have it and it comes in handy so often for me.


I always see a GHB as a fast response bag. "I've got to get somewhere as fast as possible" type thing.  So extra food and water help keep you on the trail and not searching for these items. I want my basic needs covered so I can hustle. Water, Food, Shelter, Fire, throw in safety and protection and your good to go for a short period of time and with skills and a plan you extend that time period exponentially.
Link Posted: 1/14/2014 8:19:09 AM EDT
[#36]
It's not fun, but enough water to last for a 30 mile hike.   I'd say 300 ounces but I live in a hot climate.  I'd also throw in shoes you hike 30 miles in.  Also maybe some electrolyte pills.
Link Posted: 1/14/2014 10:19:21 AM EDT
[#37]

I'd drop two mags and replace them with; moleskin, water (actutal water), a bit of sunscreen, bug repellent, a couple of crock pot liners to carry water and maybe a universal sill cock valve tool.  Maybe compartmentalize some stuff a little more with a pair of socks, put the items in the socks. Maybe add more cordage or some duct tape or both.




One contractor garbage bag will take care of poncho and might help with a shelter. Plus, as a shelter it basically looks like garbage from a distance, so stealthy.




Switch the bottle for stainless or aluminum, easier to heat it to boil then.




You need a dump kit. (TP, baby wipes)  But only one if you are not carrying more food.




How about something reflective on the bag so you can find it in the dark? Those things cyclists use on their ankles or just some reflective tape on it would help a lot. If you are splitting due to just about any natural disaster, half the time you have to go it's going to be dark. With a weak LED light I can see my GHB from across the 150 foot basement at work with a quick swipe of the light.




Put the extra magazines in your truck, not in the bag. Concentrate on running and moving not fighting.  If you need four mags, you didn't run hard enough.




A knife out like that on the strap on campus is a BAD IDEA. I don't care how enlightened the locals are, you are not dealing with locals, pantywaste new yorkers are EVERYWHERE.  Especially an expensive knife like that.  Re-position it so it's on the inside of the strap and parallel with the strap, or put it in the bag, or tie a string to it and put it around your neck under your shirt.




I'd also drop one of the knives or move the folder to EDC utility rather than keep it in the bag.  That way you have an EDC and you have the blade on the multi-tool and the fixed in the bag. You MIGHT have to bolt without your EDC gear, and you might need a knife for every day use.




CASH. Whatever you have, double it.
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