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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 12/12/2014 2:35:48 PM EST
I went from Esbit style fuel bar stoves to a nice Snow Peak- so I missed the home made alcohol stove thing back when it was cool.

I recently go given some kind of old nesting camping kit and I want to build a spare one person cooking kit for my son. I think an alcohol stove might make a good base for it.

Any links on you tube to ones you have successfully built? There are a slot of versions and I would like a good stating point (I saw one that required getting fiberglass and insulation, I would like to avoid that.)

Do multiple fuels work or just denatured alcohol? I keep a lot of camp fuel for the Coleman. Lamp fuel? Diesel?

What kind of boiling times do you get?

Do the need a pot stand?
Link Posted: 12/12/2014 2:38:04 PM EST
Just buy a mini atomic from minibulldesign and order a lid and ring from someone and make a can out of a fosters beer can. Cheap and easy.
Link Posted: 12/12/2014 7:51:27 PM EST
While homemade stoves are neat, they dont really last. For the time/effort put into making one, you might be better off with a Trangia or Vargo stove. Or if you want to go high end, an Evernew Titanium stove. I've got all three, and while the Evernew is my favorite, my Vargo is super compact, and the Trangia has more versatility with the simmer ring and such. As for a nesting kit, Trangia makes several, some of which are on sale sub $50 right now.
Link Posted: 12/12/2014 9:45:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/12/2014 9:48:44 PM EST by TribunusSanGeorgii]
I have been using one for years, and there is no reason they will not last long. The one's I made are very similar to this design. I'll try and get some pics of my setup later.

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear.html It is number 17 in the Stoves column.

It says to use fiberglass between the inner wall and the outer wall. I've tried it with and without and found no discernible difference between the two, so there is no reason to.

A lot of people will say that alcohol stoves are a no-go in the winter, but as cold as I've tried them (probably around 15 degrees, maybe colder) I have not had much of a problem. They are harder to light, but once it warms itself up, it works well. That is what I like in this particular version. The open top makes it easy to light, and let it warm up. Once the flames come out of the jets, it is ready to cook on.

I've not tried his pot stand. I use a Diamond Almonds can with some holes in for ventilation.

In regards to fuel, I would not use any petroleum distillates, and usually use denatured alcohol. I tried the red Heet once, and maybe I had the wrong bottle, but it seemed to have some sort of additive that was smelled gross. I didn't cook on it.

ETA The one warning I have is that in daylight alcohol flames are invisible, or nearly so. I have heard multiple stories of people getting ER worthy burns by trying to refill a stove that is still burning.
Link Posted: 12/13/2014 12:15:04 AM EST
Ok, so I just came back from a rollicking time in GD racking up 50 posts so I can post pics, and then a few more learning how to do it correctly.

This is my whole cook kit for solo or 2 person backpacking. It is a little too heavy for ultralight backpacking or light day hiking, but I have carried it day hiking anyway.

The whole kit in pouch.



The set is made by Coleman, but I am not sure if it is made anymore. I saw them at Walmart four or five years ago, but not recently.



The aluminum foil around the little pot is for a wind screen, and the pieces on top are to put below the stove. Even that little bit of wind protection, and extra heat reflection does wonders.


Inside the pot, I have the almond can pot stand and two bottles of fuel. The fuel bottles are re-purposed 5 hr energy shot bottles, and two can fit above the stand and under the lid of the smaller pot. I have not done scientific testing, but each bottle holds enough fuel for about 2 burn times of 5-7 minutes. Enough to sufficiently warm water for hot drinks, even if not a rolling boil in the winter.





Ok the stove itself. I like the open top designs because it allows the alcohol to prime itself. Some designs (such as the “penny stove”) have you light a bit of alcohol outside of the stove to prime it and warm the alcohol enough to send it out of the jets. With this design, you just put the alcohol into the center, light it and soon a strong flame out of the jets. This is especially helpful to make it work in the winter.

The stove has an inner wall between the open center and the outside wall of the cans. This is supposed to draw the fuel up and out to the jets. I’m not sure I understand the science, but I do know that it works well.



As you can see, I have used this stove quite a bit, and it is still going strong.



Here is the stove next to the pot stand. It is made from a can that held almonds. I drilled two rows of ventilation holes, I think 1/2” diameter. It works well, and provides plenty of air.









For longer trips, I will use a Jet Dry bottle to hold extra fuel. The squirt spout is handy. Be careful though and test at home before taking them out, I have found that some bottles required an extra O ring to keep the alcohol from spilling out. I also keep this bottle double zip-locked in my pack to contain any leakage, but so far no problems from this particular bottle.



Hopefully this helps, if there are any particular details you wanted let me know.


Link Posted: 12/13/2014 1:45:07 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2014 1:48:32 AM EST by Skibane]
Originally Posted By Currahee:
Do multiple fuels work or just denatured alcohol? I keep a lot of camp fuel for the Coleman. Lamp fuel? Diesel?
View Quote


Most of the alcohol stoves are dangerous to use with white gas.

Typically, they depend on alcohol's volatility to work properly, which is why less-volatile fuels (like kerosine or diesel) don't work in them - at least without some stove modifications.

91% isopropyl "rubbing" alcohol works in a pinch, but doesn't light as easily or burn as cleanly as denatured "grain" or "denatured" alcohol (ethanol). The less concentrated varieties of rubbing alcohol (70%, 50%, etc.) are very difficult to light.

The yellow-bottle "HEET" gas de-icer burns cleanly, lights easily, and comes in a convenient bottle size for camping. It's mostly methanol ("wood" alcohol), which is mildly corrosive to aluminum - So, any remaining fuel should be poured out of aluminum can stoves after use.

Penny Alcohol Stove
Link Posted: 12/13/2014 1:50:41 AM EST
Use the yellow Heat, not Red.
Link Posted: 12/13/2014 2:08:48 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TribunusSanGeorgii:
Ok, so I just came back from a rollicking time in GD racking up 50 posts so I can post pics, and then a few more learning how to do it correctly.

This is my whole cook kit for solo or 2 person backpacking. It is a little too heavy for ultralight backpacking or light day hiking, but I have carried it day hiking anyway.

The whole kit in pouch.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0027_zpsefa4b5ce.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0027_zpsefa4b5ce.jpg</a>

The set is made by Coleman, but I am not sure if it is made anymore. I saw them at Walmart four or five years ago, but not recently.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0028_zps06849e2e.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0028_zps06849e2e.jpg</a>

The aluminum foil around the little pot is for a wind screen, and the pieces on top are to put below the stove. Even that little bit of wind protection, and extra heat reflection does wonders.
<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0029_zps21d6c88e.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0029_zps21d6c88e.jpg</a>

Inside the pot, I have the almond can pot stand and two bottles of fuel. The fuel bottles are re-purposed 5 hr energy shot bottles, and two can fit above the stand and under the lid of the smaller pot. I have not done scientific testing, but each bottle holds enough fuel for about 2 burn times of 5-7 minutes. Enough to sufficiently warm water for hot drinks, even if not a rolling boil in the winter.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0031_zpsdbee1128.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0031_zpsdbee1128.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0030_zpsbe39a997.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0030_zpsbe39a997.jpg</a>

Ok the stove itself. I like the open top designs because it allows the alcohol to prime itself. Some designs (such as the “penny stove”) have you light a bit of alcohol outside of the stove to prime it and warm the alcohol enough to send it out of the jets. With this design, you just put the alcohol into the center, light it and soon a strong flame out of the jets. This is especially helpful to make it work in the winter.

The stove has an inner wall between the open center and the outside wall of the cans. This is supposed to draw the fuel up and out to the jets. I’m not sure I understand the science, but I do know that it works well.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg</a>

As you can see, I have used this stove quite a bit, and it is still going strong.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg</a>

Here is the stove next to the pot stand. It is made from a can that held almonds. I drilled two rows of ventilation holes, I think 1/2” diameter. It works well, and provides plenty of air.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0034_zps7e840dbe.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0034_zps7e840dbe.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0037_zps2257edaf.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0037_zps2257edaf.jpg</a>

For longer trips, I will use a Jet Dry bottle to hold extra fuel. The squirt spout is handy. Be careful though and test at home before taking them out, I have found that some bottles required an extra O ring to keep the alcohol from spilling out. I also keep this bottle double zip-locked in my pack to contain any leakage, but so far no problems from this particular bottle.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0039_zps9872553b.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0039_zps9872553b.jpg</a>

Hopefully this helps, if there are any particular details you wanted let me know.


View Quote


Your stove is super inefficient if you're only getting 5-7 minutes burn time and no boil out of that much alcohol. I'd revisit your stove for sure. There's no reason to put up with that poor performance when there are so many good soda can designs out there.
Link Posted: 12/13/2014 12:25:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:



Your stove is super inefficient if you're only getting 5-7 minutes burn time and no boil out of that much alcohol. I'd revisit your stove for sure. There's no reason to put up with that poor performance when there are so many good soda can designs out there.
View Quote



It may be longer than 5-7 mins. I've never accurately tested it. Maybe I'l play with it some more this afternoon.
Link Posted: 12/13/2014 3:08:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TribunusSanGeorgii:



It may be longer than 5-7 mins. I've never accurately tested it. Maybe I'l play with it some more this afternoon.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TribunusSanGeorgii:
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:



Your stove is super inefficient if you're only getting 5-7 minutes burn time and no boil out of that much alcohol. I'd revisit your stove for sure. There's no reason to put up with that poor performance when there are so many good soda can designs out there.



It may be longer than 5-7 mins. I've never accurately tested it. Maybe I'l play with it some more this afternoon.


For the ultimate in awesomeness, check out Tetkoba's alcohol stove r&d on youtube.

Realistically though, you should be able to build a better stove at home. Your burner holes are huge and there are way too many of them for starters. I think mine have 16 holes at most, and are much smaller than that. The thumbtack method works but it's far from ideal.

It became that it was not worth my time to build them, so the latest was a mini atomic from minibull design. I can boil 16oz of water in about 8 minutes, throw it in a Mountain House bag, and boil another 8oz for coffee in the morning, and those things are made out of Redbull cans.
Link Posted: 12/13/2014 4:20:55 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skibane:


Most of the alcohol stoves are dangerous to use with white gas.

Typically, they depend on alcohol's volatility to work properly, which is why less-volatile fuels (like kerosine or diesel) don't work in them - at least without some stove modifications.

91% isopropyl "rubbing" alcohol works in a pinch, but doesn't light as easily or burn as cleanly as denatured "grain" or "denatured" alcohol (ethanol). The less concentrated varieties of rubbing alcohol (70%, 50%, etc.) are very difficult to light.

The yellow-bottle "HEET" gas de-icer burns cleanly, lights easily, and comes in a convenient bottle size for camping. It's mostly methanol ("wood" alcohol), which is mildly corrosive to aluminum - So, any remaining fuel should be poured out of aluminum can stoves after use.

Penny Alcohol Stove
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By Currahee:
Do multiple fuels work or just denatured alcohol? I keep a lot of camp fuel for the Coleman. Lamp fuel? Diesel?


Most of the alcohol stoves are dangerous to use with white gas.

Typically, they depend on alcohol's volatility to work properly, which is why less-volatile fuels (like kerosine or diesel) don't work in them - at least without some stove modifications.

91% isopropyl "rubbing" alcohol works in a pinch, but doesn't light as easily or burn as cleanly as denatured "grain" or "denatured" alcohol (ethanol). The less concentrated varieties of rubbing alcohol (70%, 50%, etc.) are very difficult to light.

The yellow-bottle "HEET" gas de-icer burns cleanly, lights easily, and comes in a convenient bottle size for camping. It's mostly methanol ("wood" alcohol), which is mildly corrosive to aluminum - So, any remaining fuel should be poured out of aluminum can stoves after use.

Penny Alcohol Stove




I showed my son how to make a penny stove just this last summer.

We melted the penny.

Link Posted: 12/14/2014 3:54:42 PM EST
Thanks for the input so Far, I will look at some of the links.

It is gonna be home made because it's an exercise for my son and I, not to save time or money.

I really like the vented larger can to serve as a pot holder, that will work well in the application I have in mind.
Link Posted: 12/14/2014 7:33:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2014 7:34:22 PM EST by mhpoole]
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

Link Posted: 12/15/2014 9:36:12 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw

View Quote


That one almost seems to good to be true. Do you use it personaly? How long does it take to boil?
Link Posted: 12/15/2014 5:34:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/15/2014 5:35:24 PM EST by 30Caliber]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:


Your stove is super inefficient if you're only getting 5-7 minutes burn time and no boil out of that much alcohol. I'd revisit your stove for sure. There's no reason to put up with that poor performance when there are so many good soda can designs out there.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By TribunusSanGeorgii:
Ok, so I just came back from a rollicking time in GD racking up 50 posts so I can post pics, and then a few more learning how to do it correctly.

This is my whole cook kit for solo or 2 person backpacking. It is a little too heavy for ultralight backpacking or light day hiking, but I have carried it day hiking anyway.

The whole kit in pouch.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0027_zpsefa4b5ce.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0027_zpsefa4b5ce.jpg</a>

The set is made by Coleman, but I am not sure if it is made anymore. I saw them at Walmart four or five years ago, but not recently.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0028_zps06849e2e.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0028_zps06849e2e.jpg</a>

The aluminum foil around the little pot is for a wind screen, and the pieces on top are to put below the stove. Even that little bit of wind protection, and extra heat reflection does wonders.
<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0029_zps21d6c88e.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0029_zps21d6c88e.jpg</a>

Inside the pot, I have the almond can pot stand and two bottles of fuel. The fuel bottles are re-purposed 5 hr energy shot bottles, and two can fit above the stand and under the lid of the smaller pot. I have not done scientific testing, but each bottle holds enough fuel for about 2 burn times of 5-7 minutes. Enough to sufficiently warm water for hot drinks, even if not a rolling boil in the winter.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0031_zpsdbee1128.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0031_zpsdbee1128.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0030_zpsbe39a997.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0030_zpsbe39a997.jpg</a>

Ok the stove itself. I like the open top designs because it allows the alcohol to prime itself. Some designs (such as the "penny stove”) have you light a bit of alcohol outside of the stove to prime it and warm the alcohol enough to send it out of the jets. With this design, you just put the alcohol into the center, light it and soon a strong flame out of the jets. This is especially helpful to make it work in the winter.

The stove has an inner wall between the open center and the outside wall of the cans. This is supposed to draw the fuel up and out to the jets. I’m not sure I understand the science, but I do know that it works well.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg</a>

As you can see, I have used this stove quite a bit, and it is still going strong.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg</a>

Here is the stove next to the pot stand. It is made from a can that held almonds. I drilled two rows of ventilation holes, I think 1/2” diameter. It works well, and provides plenty of air.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0034_zps7e840dbe.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0034_zps7e840dbe.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0037_zps2257edaf.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0037_zps2257edaf.jpg</a>

For longer trips, I will use a Jet Dry bottle to hold extra fuel. The squirt spout is handy. Be careful though and test at home before taking them out, I have found that some bottles required an extra O ring to keep the alcohol from spilling out. I also keep this bottle double zip-locked in my pack to contain any leakage, but so far no problems from this particular bottle.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0039_zps9872553b.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0039_zps9872553b.jpg</a>

Hopefully this helps, if there are any particular details you wanted let me know.




Your stove is super inefficient if you're only getting 5-7 minutes burn time and no boil out of that much alcohol. I'd revisit your stove for sure. There's no reason to put up with that poor performance when there are so many good soda can designs out there.

Using that same stove, I get roughly 12 min from 1-2 oz alcohol. Boils 2cups in about 5 min.
Link Posted: 12/15/2014 6:20:13 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 30Caliber:

Using that same stove, I get roughly 12 min from 1-2 oz alcohol. Boils 2cups in about 5 min.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 30Caliber:
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By TribunusSanGeorgii:
Ok, so I just came back from a rollicking time in GD racking up 50 posts so I can post pics, and then a few more learning how to do it correctly.

This is my whole cook kit for solo or 2 person backpacking. It is a little too heavy for ultralight backpacking or light day hiking, but I have carried it day hiking anyway.

The whole kit in pouch.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0027_zpsefa4b5ce.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0027_zpsefa4b5ce.jpg</a>

The set is made by Coleman, but I am not sure if it is made anymore. I saw them at Walmart four or five years ago, but not recently.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0028_zps06849e2e.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0028_zps06849e2e.jpg</a>

The aluminum foil around the little pot is for a wind screen, and the pieces on top are to put below the stove. Even that little bit of wind protection, and extra heat reflection does wonders.
<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0029_zps21d6c88e.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0029_zps21d6c88e.jpg</a>

Inside the pot, I have the almond can pot stand and two bottles of fuel. The fuel bottles are re-purposed 5 hr energy shot bottles, and two can fit above the stand and under the lid of the smaller pot. I have not done scientific testing, but each bottle holds enough fuel for about 2 burn times of 5-7 minutes. Enough to sufficiently warm water for hot drinks, even if not a rolling boil in the winter.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0031_zpsdbee1128.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0031_zpsdbee1128.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0030_zpsbe39a997.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0030_zpsbe39a997.jpg</a>

Ok the stove itself. I like the open top designs because it allows the alcohol to prime itself. Some designs (such as the "penny stove”) have you light a bit of alcohol outside of the stove to prime it and warm the alcohol enough to send it out of the jets. With this design, you just put the alcohol into the center, light it and soon a strong flame out of the jets. This is especially helpful to make it work in the winter.

The stove has an inner wall between the open center and the outside wall of the cans. This is supposed to draw the fuel up and out to the jets. I’m not sure I understand the science, but I do know that it works well.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg</a>

As you can see, I have used this stove quite a bit, and it is still going strong.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0032_zpse4ce1de0.jpg</a>

Here is the stove next to the pot stand. It is made from a can that held almonds. I drilled two rows of ventilation holes, I think 1/2” diameter. It works well, and provides plenty of air.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0034_zps7e840dbe.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0034_zps7e840dbe.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0035_zps4147b894.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0037_zps2257edaf.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0037_zps2257edaf.jpg</a>

For longer trips, I will use a Jet Dry bottle to hold extra fuel. The squirt spout is handy. Be careful though and test at home before taking them out, I have found that some bottles required an extra O ring to keep the alcohol from spilling out. I also keep this bottle double zip-locked in my pack to contain any leakage, but so far no problems from this particular bottle.

<a href="http://s1381.photobucket.com/user/aquilifertrf/media/_DSC0039_zps9872553b.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah236/aquilifertrf/_DSC0039_zps9872553b.jpg</a>

Hopefully this helps, if there are any particular details you wanted let me know.




Your stove is super inefficient if you're only getting 5-7 minutes burn time and no boil out of that much alcohol. I'd revisit your stove for sure. There's no reason to put up with that poor performance when there are so many good soda can designs out there.

Using that same stove, I get roughly 12 min from 1-2 oz alcohol. Boils 2cups in about 5 min.


That's much more in line with what a simple soda can stove should do.

I've still got a couple I use from time to time, but I've moved on to smaller stuff like the Minibull Designs Bongo line and the Smokeeater908 MiniHeat. It sort of becomes an addiction. I think the next thing I'll do is make a Zelph Fancee Feest.

OP, do a youtube search for "Stove World at Shug's." Shug Emery does a cool little review of the stoves he's used over the years. He's a good guy and shares lots of knowledge.
Link Posted: 12/17/2014 6:55:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2014 6:56:59 PM EST by mhpoole]
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Originally Posted By Currahee:


That one almost seems to good to be true. Do you use it personaly? How long does it take to boil?
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Originally Posted By Currahee:
Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw



That one almost seems to good to be true. Do you use it personaly? How long does it take to boil?
Yes, use it all the time. 7-8 min to boil 2 cups. Pretty much don't use my Pocket Rocket anymore, because I like this setup so much.
Link Posted: 12/19/2014 11:55:21 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Skibane:


Most of the alcohol stoves are dangerous to use with white gas.

Typically, they depend on alcohol's volatility to work properly, which is why less-volatile fuels (like kerosine or diesel) don't work in them - at least without some stove modifications.

91% isopropyl "rubbing" alcohol works in a pinch, but doesn't light as easily or burn as cleanly as denatured "grain" or "denatured" alcohol (ethanol). The less concentrated varieties of rubbing alcohol (70%, 50%, etc.) are very difficult to light.

The yellow-bottle "HEET" gas de-icer burns cleanly, lights easily, and comes in a convenient bottle size for camping. It's mostly methanol ("wood" alcohol), which is mildly corrosive to aluminum - So, any remaining fuel should be poured out of aluminum can stoves after use.

Penny Alcohol Stove
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Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By Currahee:
Do multiple fuels work or just denatured alcohol? I keep a lot of camp fuel for the Coleman. Lamp fuel? Diesel?


Most of the alcohol stoves are dangerous to use with white gas.

Typically, they depend on alcohol's volatility to work properly, which is why less-volatile fuels (like kerosine or diesel) don't work in them - at least without some stove modifications.

91% isopropyl "rubbing" alcohol works in a pinch, but doesn't light as easily or burn as cleanly as denatured "grain" or "denatured" alcohol (ethanol). The less concentrated varieties of rubbing alcohol (70%, 50%, etc.) are very difficult to light.

The yellow-bottle "HEET" gas de-icer burns cleanly, lights easily, and comes in a convenient bottle size for camping. It's mostly methanol ("wood" alcohol), which is mildly corrosive to aluminum - So, any remaining fuel should be poured out of aluminum can stoves after use.

Penny Alcohol Stove

Not a fan of the penny stove. It's a pain to fill, tricky to prime and doesn't offer any real advantage over the kind shown in the post above with all the photos (which you just dump fuel into and light and off she runs).
Link Posted: 12/20/2014 3:15:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By Currahee:

What kind of boiling times do you get?

Do the need a pot stand?
View Quote

I made my share over the years, my favorite fits in an Esbit stove when it is closed. I also added two pieces of copper sheet to close in the stove on the open sides. That plus a pot with lid and I get good boil times.
Link Posted: 12/20/2014 9:29:57 PM EST
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Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw

View Quote


I tried that stove. While it works, in testing against a homemade Caldera Cone and the Trangia 25, it was far less efficient.

After a lot of unpromising wrangling with homemade alcohol stoves, I always seem to come back to the Trangia burner.
Link Posted: 12/20/2014 9:59:49 PM EST
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Originally Posted By California14er:
After a lot of unpromising wrangling with homemade alcohol stoves, I always seem to come back to the Trangia burner.
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Yep - It's a superb design.

Works great with a Sterno folding stove, if you can tolerate the extra weight and bulk.
Link Posted: 12/24/2014 11:35:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By California14er:


I tried that stove. While it works, in testing against a homemade Caldera Cone and the Trangia 25, it was far less efficient.

After a lot of unpromising wrangling with homemade alcohol stoves, I always seem to come back to the Trangia burner.
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Originally Posted By California14er:
Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw



I tried that stove. While it works, in testing against a homemade Caldera Cone and the Trangia 25, it was far less efficient.

After a lot of unpromising wrangling with homemade alcohol stoves, I always seem to come back to the Trangia burner.
Nothing beats the Fancy Feast for weight and ease of use, sorry. Use a wind screen, light and forget while doing something else for 10 minutes and your water is done.
Link Posted: 12/25/2014 12:46:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/25/2014 12:49:13 PM EST by batmanacw]
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Originally Posted By Currahee:
Thanks for the input so Far, I will look at some of the links.

It is gonna be home made because it's an exercise for my son and I, not to save time or money.

I really like the vented larger can to serve as a pot holder, that will work well in the application I have in mind.
View Quote


If you are worried about durability search my threads on alcohol stoves. My venom can stove is very durable. It boils 2 cups of water in 5 minutes with no wind. I set my pot right on top of it.
Link Posted: 12/25/2014 4:31:59 PM EST
Here is Skurka himself, discussing making the catfood can stove mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=pajkt594Ruw


This is the one I made. While light, it wasn't as nice for me as either the Caldera Cone or the (heavy) Trangia 25. If people try it and like it, they should absolutely use it with confidence.

Skurka is an interesting chap, who has used this stove on the SHR, and so, for what it is, it's proven to work.
Link Posted: 12/25/2014 7:18:29 PM EST
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Originally Posted By California14er:
Here is Skurka himself, discussing making the catfood can stove mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=pajkt594Ruw


This is the one I made. While light, it wasn't as nice for me as either the Caldera Cone or the (heavy) Trangia 25. If people try it and like it, they should absolutely use it with confidence.

Skurka is an interesting chap, who has used this stove on the SHR, and so, for what it is, it's proven to work.
View Quote



Point of interest, Skurka's "Fancy Feast" stove is just a Supercat stove that's been around for about 10 years or so. It is not to be confused with Zelph's "Fancee Feest" stove which, while using a cat food can, is of a significantly different design. Zelph's is a better stove IMO.
Link Posted: 12/26/2014 9:04:40 PM EST
Oddly enough, I had occasion to actually need to heat up one of those Hormel Compleats microwave dinner (microwave wasn't available since the RV it was in got left behind after I'd already packed for the trip).

I happened to have some aluminum cupcake liners and some small loaf pans in my bug-out bag. So, I put the cupcake liner in the center of the load pan, put about 1/4" of hand sanitizer (65% alcohol) in it, and lit it. I scooped the dinner into a second loaf pan, and placed it on top of the first loaf pan rotated 90 deg. As a suggestion, don't leave a plastic spoon in whatever you're heating up.

That little 1/4" of alcohol in a cupcake liner heated up the microwave dinner in 2 minutes. The microwave would have taken 90 seconds. The group I was with was looking at me like I was some kind of Martian right up to the point where I had hot food and they didn't. Then I got the McGyver comments.

Ever since then, I've kept hand sanitizer and aluminum cupcake liners and loaf pans in my bags.
Link Posted: 12/26/2014 10:09:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw

View Quote


The version of that stove I made worked great and had half as many holes in it. I think I was boiling two cups in just over 5 minutes.
Link Posted: 12/26/2014 10:35:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By JohnnyC:



Point of interest, Skurka's "Fancy Feast" stove is just a Supercat stove that's been around for about 10 years or so. It is not to be confused with Zelph's "Fancee Feest" stove which, while using a cat food can, is of a significantly different design. Zelph's is a better stove IMO.
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Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By California14er:
Here is Skurka himself, discussing making the catfood can stove mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=pajkt594Ruw


This is the one I made. While light, it wasn't as nice for me as either the Caldera Cone or the (heavy) Trangia 25. If people try it and like it, they should absolutely use it with confidence.

Skurka is an interesting chap, who has used this stove on the SHR, and so, for what it is, it's proven to work.



Point of interest, Skurka's "Fancy Feast" stove is just a Supercat stove that's been around for about 10 years or so. It is not to be confused with Zelph's "Fancee Feest" stove which, while using a cat food can, is of a significantly different design. Zelph's is a better stove IMO.



I looked at the Zelph stove. I'm not entirely sure why the wick is needed at all. The holes in the screen would act as little jets.

I might try one but right now I'm thinking about just making another super cat with smaller holes tighter around the top. Smaller holes mean longer burns. I just want the heat centered under the pot. I might use the SS screen to lift the pot 1/2" to see how it affects the burn.
Link Posted: 12/27/2014 12:27:41 PM EST
I have tinkered with a couple of designs but never got the benefit of the 'side burner' design. The more time the heat is in contact with the pot the better heat transfer you will get.

Check out some of the Chimney Design on YouTube.

This guy seems to have a decent design https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3mEDyYuSsI

Check out his other vids...
Link Posted: 12/27/2014 10:03:47 PM EST
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Originally Posted By batmanacw:



I looked at the Zelph stove. I'm not entirely sure why the wick is needed at all. The holes in the screen would act as little jets.

I might try one but right now I'm thinking about just making another super cat with smaller holes tighter around the top. Smaller holes mean longer burns. I just want the heat centered under the pot. I might use the SS screen to lift the pot 1/2" to see how it affects the burn.
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Originally Posted By batmanacw:
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By California14er:
Here is Skurka himself, discussing making the catfood can stove mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=pajkt594Ruw


This is the one I made. While light, it wasn't as nice for me as either the Caldera Cone or the (heavy) Trangia 25. If people try it and like it, they should absolutely use it with confidence.

Skurka is an interesting chap, who has used this stove on the SHR, and so, for what it is, it's proven to work.



Point of interest, Skurka's "Fancy Feast" stove is just a Supercat stove that's been around for about 10 years or so. It is not to be confused with Zelph's "Fancee Feest" stove which, while using a cat food can, is of a significantly different design. Zelph's is a better stove IMO.



I looked at the Zelph stove. I'm not entirely sure why the wick is needed at all. The holes in the screen would act as little jets.

I might try one but right now I'm thinking about just making another super cat with smaller holes tighter around the top. Smaller holes mean longer burns. I just want the heat centered under the pot. I might use the SS screen to lift the pot 1/2" to see how it affects the burn.



I'm not sure what Zelph stove you're talking about. The early ones maybe? That design doesn't exist any more.

Fancee Feest
Link Posted: 12/27/2014 10:43:01 PM EST
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Originally Posted By JohnnyC:



I'm not sure what Zelph stove you're talking about. The early ones maybe? That design doesn't exist any more.

Fancee Feest
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Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By batmanacw:
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By California14er:
Here is Skurka himself, discussing making the catfood can stove mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=pajkt594Ruw


This is the one I made. While light, it wasn't as nice for me as either the Caldera Cone or the (heavy) Trangia 25. If people try it and like it, they should absolutely use it with confidence.

Skurka is an interesting chap, who has used this stove on the SHR, and so, for what it is, it's proven to work.



Point of interest, Skurka's "Fancy Feast" stove is just a Supercat stove that's been around for about 10 years or so. It is not to be confused with Zelph's "Fancee Feest" stove which, while using a cat food can, is of a significantly different design. Zelph's is a better stove IMO.



I looked at the Zelph stove. I'm not entirely sure why the wick is needed at all. The holes in the screen would act as little jets.

I might try one but right now I'm thinking about just making another super cat with smaller holes tighter around the top. Smaller holes mean longer burns. I just want the heat centered under the pot. I might use the SS screen to lift the pot 1/2" to see how it affects the burn.



I'm not sure what Zelph stove you're talking about. The early ones maybe? That design doesn't exist any more.

Fancee Feest


I know about the design change. Still doesn't seem like anything special.
Link Posted: 12/28/2014 3:07:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By batmanacw:


I know about the design change. Still doesn't seem like anything special.
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Originally Posted By batmanacw:
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By batmanacw:
Originally Posted By JohnnyC:
Originally Posted By California14er:
Here is Skurka himself, discussing making the catfood can stove mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=pajkt594Ruw


This is the one I made. While light, it wasn't as nice for me as either the Caldera Cone or the (heavy) Trangia 25. If people try it and like it, they should absolutely use it with confidence.

Skurka is an interesting chap, who has used this stove on the SHR, and so, for what it is, it's proven to work.



Point of interest, Skurka's "Fancy Feast" stove is just a Supercat stove that's been around for about 10 years or so. It is not to be confused with Zelph's "Fancee Feest" stove which, while using a cat food can, is of a significantly different design. Zelph's is a better stove IMO.



I looked at the Zelph stove. I'm not entirely sure why the wick is needed at all. The holes in the screen would act as little jets.

I might try one but right now I'm thinking about just making another super cat with smaller holes tighter around the top. Smaller holes mean longer burns. I just want the heat centered under the pot. I might use the SS screen to lift the pot 1/2" to see how it affects the burn.



I'm not sure what Zelph stove you're talking about. The early ones maybe? That design doesn't exist any more.

Fancee Feest


I know about the design change. Still doesn't seem like anything special.



I don't think anyone is saying it's more or less special than any other stove. It just seemed like you were referencing an older model, which of course would be less effective than a new improved model.
Link Posted: 1/11/2015 8:25:30 PM EST
Started playing with it this weekend. It works but needs more development.

Link Posted: 1/11/2015 11:35:40 PM EST
Put a lid on your pot. It will boil 2 cups 7-8 min. Then put noodles in, maybe then just set the pot in a pot cozy, made from Reflectix

Link Posted: 1/12/2015 12:28:20 AM EST
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Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Put a lid on your pot. It will boil 2 cups 7-8 min. Then put noodles in, maybe then just set the pot in a pot cozy, made from Reflectix

http://youtu.be/-FTln2_5Pgo

View Quote


I plan on trying a lid, but I need to figure out a way it can be stored with the kit.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 1:22:57 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Currahee:


I plan on trying a lid, but I need to figure out a way it can be stored with the kit.
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Originally Posted By Currahee:
Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Put a lid on your pot. It will boil 2 cups 7-8 min. Then put noodles in, maybe then just set the pot in a pot cozy, made from Reflectix

http://youtu.be/-FTln2_5Pgo



I plan on trying a lid, but I need to figure out a way it can be stored with the kit.


Most guys I know keep their cook kit in a stuff sack. You can put the lids at the bottom of the stuff sack so that everything else can nest.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 2:07:23 AM EST
MSR Titan Kettle I use this, have had it for years. Although the little red part around the handle burned off rather quickly. The kettle is a solid piece of gear.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 7:47:47 AM EST
The point of this exercise was mostly to see how cheap I could do this (I've got a stove I like.)

I need to figure out how to put a lid on it in that context.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 3:45:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/12/2015 3:53:36 PM EST by DrCyCoe]
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Originally Posted By Currahee:
The point of this exercise was mostly to see how cheap I could do this (I've got a stove I like.)

I need to figure out how to put a lid on it in that context.
View Quote

The cheapest and easiest way to make a lid that stores inside your pot would be to use heavy aluminum foil. Determine what size square will fit in the bottom of your pot. Lets say a 2" square fits. That means cut a square 4"x4". Fold it in half twice and you end up with a 4 layer square that is 2"x2" that will fit in the pot and can easily be unfolded for use when needed. Using heavy foil allows it to be reused and easier to work with. There are lots of things you can do but it is hard to beat aluminum foil for easy use. The foil is also multipurpose.

For something a bit more solid you can use copper foil. You can find it in art stores or online, it comes in a roll, you cut it with snips or scissors to size. I have done that for 20 years and still have pieces I made early on. You could make a round lid that has a small lip that fits around the pots top edge. This is not the cheapest way to go these days but durable. A third option is to buy a small pack of tin pieces used by roofers, they may be 4"x6" and you can cut those to size as well. I test ideas with tin and when I like something, I remake it in a more durable material.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 4:10:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Currahee:


That one almost seems to good to be true. Do you use it personaly? How long does it take to boil?
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Originally Posted By Currahee:
Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw



That one almost seems to good to be true. Do you use it personaly? How long does it take to boil?
Made those. They work.


^^ More than you wanted to know about the SuperCat stove. Including fuel, best practices, experiments and variations.

The part I like best is any gas-station / convenience store will have everything you need to build one.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 4:17:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Currahee:
Started playing with it this weekend. It works but needs more development.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CtUKVg7eGc
View Quote
Ramen on my electric stove cooks in about twenty minutes.

I think you are expecting too much. If you gotta eat in 5 minutes and get back on the trail in some kind of forced march, stick with MREs and eat them cold.
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 5:02:05 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DrCyCoe:

The cheapest and easiest way to make a lid that stores inside your pot would be to use heavy aluminum foil. Determine what size square will fit in the bottom of your pot. Lets say a 2" square fits. That means cut a square 4"x4". Fold it in half twice and you end up with a 4 layer square that is 2"x2" that will fit in the pot and can easily be unfolded for use when needed. Using heavy foil allows it to be reused and easier to work with. There are lots of things you can do but it is hard to beat aluminum foil for easy use. The foil is also multipurpose.

For something a bit more solid you can use copper foil. You can find it in art stores or online, it comes in a roll, you cut it with snips or scissors to size. I have done that for 20 years and still have pieces I made early on. You could make a round lid that has a small lip that fits around the pots top edge. This is not the cheapest way to go these days but durable. A third option is to buy a small pack of tin pieces used by roofers, they may be 4"x6" and you can cut those to size as well. I test ideas with tin and when I like something, I remake it in a more durable material.
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Originally Posted By DrCyCoe:
Originally Posted By Currahee:
The point of this exercise was mostly to see how cheap I could do this (I've got a stove I like.)

I need to figure out how to put a lid on it in that context.

The cheapest and easiest way to make a lid that stores inside your pot would be to use heavy aluminum foil. Determine what size square will fit in the bottom of your pot. Lets say a 2" square fits. That means cut a square 4"x4". Fold it in half twice and you end up with a 4 layer square that is 2"x2" that will fit in the pot and can easily be unfolded for use when needed. Using heavy foil allows it to be reused and easier to work with. There are lots of things you can do but it is hard to beat aluminum foil for easy use. The foil is also multipurpose.

For something a bit more solid you can use copper foil. You can find it in art stores or online, it comes in a roll, you cut it with snips or scissors to size. I have done that for 20 years and still have pieces I made early on. You could make a round lid that has a small lip that fits around the pots top edge. This is not the cheapest way to go these days but durable. A third option is to buy a small pack of tin pieces used by roofers, they may be 4"x6" and you can cut those to size as well. I test ideas with tin and when I like something, I remake it in a more durable material.


Thank you, I was thinking I would use the foil that came on the cookie sheet (that I used to make the wind screen, same idea.)
Link Posted: 1/12/2015 5:04:35 PM EST
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Originally Posted By RR_Broccoli:
Made those. They work.

http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/

^^ More than you wanted to know about the SuperCat stove. Including fuel, best practices, experiments and variations.

The part I like best is any gas-station / convenience store will have everything you need to build one.
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Originally Posted By RR_Broccoli:
Originally Posted By Currahee:
Originally Posted By mhpoole:
Fancy Feast Alcohol Stove. This is all you need to know. Pot stand / stove all in one. Very light, cheap, durable.

http://youtu.be/pajkt594Ruw



That one almost seems to good to be true. Do you use it personaly? How long does it take to boil?
Made those. They work.

http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/

^^ More than you wanted to know about the SuperCat stove. Including fuel, best practices, experiments and variations.

The part I like best is any gas-station / convenience store will have everything you need to build one.


Thank you, I will spend some time on those links.

I think it is important to understand how to do anything as many ways as possible. Purify water and or cook food is high on that list. My son was with me the whole time and this will actually be his cook kit.

I was working off the boil time I saw in some of the vids. I don't think it was to terribly bad. If I was in that much of a hurry I would just eat the Ramen Raw.
Link Posted: 1/15/2015 6:53:11 PM EST
I think one of the values of knowing how to make an inexpensive alcohol stove out of a small can and a nail, is that on longer hikes, one is not necessarily completely screwed by the failure of a $200 petrol stove. The adapt, overcome and carry on thing.
Link Posted: 1/15/2015 7:23:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By California14er:
I think one of the values of knowing how to make an inexpensive alcohol stove out of a small can and a nail, is that on longer hikes, one is not necessarily completely screwed by the failure of a $200 petrol stove. The adapt, overcome and carry on thing.
View Quote


This applies to prepping in general, not jut long hikes.

For the same reason I have built hobo stoves and wood gassifier stoves.

Next on the list is brick rocket stove.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 12:03:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/16/2015 12:10:19 PM EST by DrCyCoe]
I have an out door "warming station" that is based on a milk can with the bottom removed. Then I have an assortment of steel pipe pieces, tin, stainless steel sheets and other goodies that I can insert in the pipes, use to reflect heat or direct air flow. Even a barrel that fits over the milk can. Its been a great way to experiment with the basics of a rocket heater. This year I am going to build a small one in the garden, then cover it with a small hoop house or structure of some kind. Basically have a heated bench for cooler days and then experiment with using it to heat a potential greenhouse or similar set up. Maybe do some winter nights out there to see how it goes.

Wood pellets are great to have around for doing quick test fires. We also went to burning pellets in our fireplace this winter, which was built in 1950 and I am never going back to cutting wood except to have as a backup fuel source and for outdoor fires.

I have a bunch of 3'x4' steel frames with wood planking for the bottom that were used to stack and store steel. They also have side frames about 8' high. Each corner leg is open on top to add vertical steel supports. I may use them to frame up a structure and then run heat under it since they are about 4" to 6" high from the ground. So I end up with a heated structure that can be used as cold frame on roids early and late in the growing season, great winter fun house and a way to test rocket mass heating.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 8:23:56 AM EST
I made this cat can stove out of a steel potted meat can. It worked pretty good. I may try to make one out of an aluminum can and see if it works better. Some of the Internet posts I have seen suggest aluminum works better.

My Walmart grease pot made a pretty good water heating pot too.

Saturday was the first chance I had to try out either. I have had both for quite some time, but never got around to using them.

http://ilbob.blogspot.com/2015/01/2015-01-17-cat-can-stove-walmart-grease.html
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