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Posted: 7/31/2017 2:01:50 AM EDT
I posted this in GD but thought it would be better served in the Outdoor Discussions forum.

Fellow non Tarded camp bothers....   If some of you guys haven't looked into hammock camping, your missing out. I just switched from tents to hammocks this year and I will never sleep in a tent again unless I'm forced to. I sleep like a rock in a hammock. No longer do I have to look for a flat place for a tent. I will no longer "think" I found a perfect spot to pitch a tent, only to find out once I get into my sleeping bag the ground has a slope or a high spot under my back.

Here are a few links for the cool, non basement dwellers to look at.   If you do end up getting a hammock, get one with a bug net, under quilt, top quilt and rain fly.

Three of the more popular hammocks are the Blackbird XLC, Ridgerunner
and Dutchwear Chameleon. To be clear, these aren't the only really good
hammocks out there. If you worried about the cold, they're under/top
quilts rated down to zero deg.

https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product-category/hammocks/   Blackbird XLC is what I sleep in.
https://dutchwaregear.com/hammock-gear/hammocks.html/  The Chameleon is a new hammock and everyone is raving about it.
http://undergroundquilts.com/shop/default.html
http://hammockgear.com/econ-quilts/
https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/forum.php

Below is the Blackbird XLC

 
This is the Warbonnet Ridgerunner


Here a channel to check out if you want to learn about hammocks. This is
Shug. Many a man that hammocks camps have a non homo man crush on this
clown.

Hammock Hangin' How-To PART 1... Essentials For Noobs Part 1


Hammock Hangin' How-To PART 2 ...Essentials For Noobs & Whatnots


A Peek at the Dutchware Chameleon Hammock





Tent camping is for suckers.
Link Posted: 7/31/2017 4:39:14 PM EDT
[#1]
What does the Warbonnet hammock offer over an ENO hammock? I've used an ENO hammock for field problems over the last year.  It has worked fine, especially when I use it with my tarp strung over the top of the hammock as a rain block.  I almost bought one of the Warbonnet, but went with the cheaper ENO.  I'm getting ready to deploy and am considering picking up a Warbonnet.  Is it worth the extra money?  Thanks for your feedback.
Link Posted: 7/31/2017 10:15:03 PM EDT
[#2]
Built in bug net, longer, built in shelf, built in footbox, probably higher quality material.
Link Posted: 7/31/2017 11:40:27 PM EDT
[#3]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
What does the Warbonnet hammock offer over an ENO hammock? I've used an ENO hammock for field problems over the last year.  It has worked fine, especially when I use it with my tarp strung over the top of the hammock as a rain block.  I almost bought one of the Warbonnet, but went with the cheaper ENO.  I'm getting ready to deploy and am considering picking up a Warbonnet.  Is it worth the extra money?  Thanks for your feedback.
View Quote
I don't own a ENO hammock, so I'm no expert on that type of hammock.

I do know the ENO is a simple straight cut parachute type hammock at are generally narrower. The general camping hammocks that I'm talking about are a completely different animal. Camping hammocks are generally wider, cut asymmetrical or have a modified gathered end to make the sides a little baggier to make it easier for you to turn at an angle inside the hammock. Turning 20ish deg in a asymmetrical type hammock lets your feet, head and shoulders drop down lower inside to get a mostly flat lay inside the hammock. It does this without your head or feet being smashed against the sides. Very comfortable. Just remember, the head end of the hammock always hangs lower than the food end. On the blackbird xlc, I hang the foot end 12-18" higher.


My main takeaway is, comparing the two types are an apple to orange thing. If your not going to have a lot of bugs where your going and want to save a few bucks, the Warbonnet 11 foot "Traveler XL" hammock is basically the Blackbird XLC without the bug net, shelf, pullout cords, head box and foot box. But more importantly, unlike the ENO, it has a structural amsteel ridgeline that makes hanging the hammock much easier and is much wider. They are $70 for a 1.7 single layer with whoopie suspension and tree straps. The guy at Warbonnet might be able to add tie outs on the traveler xl to pull out the head/foot box, you would have to ask. The only thing extra you would need is two carabiners to hook to the tree straps to the whoopies. Whoopies are a type of suspension made from 7/64 rope where the rope loops back and runs inside of itself for a short distance. When the suspension is pulled tight the whoopie tightens like chinese handcuffs locking the rope in place. Whoopies are the way to go. I know what your thinking... '7/64th rope is not going to hold my fat ass'.   It's made with amsteel and the 7/64th amsteel has a breaking strength around 1600lb. Strong stuff Maynard. 

I know all that is not very helpful. Sorry.

Scooter
Link Posted: 8/2/2017 11:09:19 AM EDT
[#4]
Thanks for the replies!  I was going to buy a warbonnet hammock last year for work (am in the Army).  I bought a ENO instead and pair it with a Hilleberg tarp 10.  That combo has worked very well for the work I do (cavalry squadron in a light infantry brigade).  I need to research the warbonnet product to see if it will pack down as small as the ENO hammock w/ straps.  Again, thanks for the input!
Link Posted: 8/3/2017 3:11:18 PM EDT
[#5]
If you want "1-stop shopping" go Warbonnet or Hennessy.  
Dutchwaregear has lots of good stuff if you like to build it up yourself.  I built an adjustable ridgeline, 2-layer, 11 footer with a fronkey style bugnet, using whoopie slings...and it's NICE.
Link Posted: 8/8/2017 11:03:26 AM EDT
[#6]
This is what the inside of a top quilt looks like.

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 8/8/2017 11:18:36 AM EDT
[#7]
Newb at it.
But I've been running my sil tarp with a Yukon jungle or double hammock  under it. The double is longer and wider. Much more comfortable than the jungle hammock.
I just picked up one of the twisted root flys. 11+ x 9+ . 
No quilt here. But I use my standard bag and deflated thermal rest in them.
Until I fall completely in love and gain more set up knowledge it's where I'm at.

I run 1 inch webbing for tree straps 
Marlin spiked to amsteel whoopie slings. 

So far it's just learning curve ,that's hampering me lol .

And not knowing what's crawling under me at o dark thirty lmao.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 7:54:57 AM EDT
[#8]
Made the leap.  I've tried bigger and fatter pads but I suppose I'm just to broken too sleep in the dirt any more.

Just received a Chameleon from Dutch, a Cuben hammock tarp from Z-pack and have a HG under quilt on order.  I'm also looking at a bigger pack as my current set-up is built around light weight/ ultra LW gear and the hammock set-up is most definitely taking up more volume. My current packs are a GO-lite Jam and a Z-Pack Arc Blast which may work for summer but won't be big enough for cold weather, which is my preferable hiking. Have a Granite Gear VC60 on order to see if that will work.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 11:29:14 AM EDT
[#9]
Here is a picture from a trip to southern Utah last weekend. Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 11:32:39 AM EDT
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Made the leap.  I've tried bigger and fatter pads but I suppose I'm just to broken to sleep in the dirt any more.

Just received a Chameleon from Dutch, a Cuben hammock tarp from Z-pack and have a HG under quilt on order.  I'm also looking at a bigger pack as my current set-up is built around light weight/ ultra LW gear and the hammock set-up is most definitely taking up more volume. My current packs are a GO-lite Jam and a Z-Pack Arc Blast which may work for summer but won't be big enough for cold weather, which is my preferable hiking. Have a Granite Gear VC60 on order to see if that will work.
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Very cool! Have you test driven the chameleon yet? How do you like it? Single or double and how thick? 

It was raining at home yesterday so I put up my Blackbird XLC in the backyard just to to relax for a bit. I fell asleep till 1am.
@pdm
Link Posted: 9/9/2017 8:29:06 PM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Very cool! Have you test driven the chameleon yet? How do you like it? Single or double and how thick? 

It was raining at home yesterday so I put up my Blackbird XLC in the backyard just to to relax for a bit. I fell asleep till 1am.
@pdm
View Quote
@ScooterInVegas

I've done a bunch of test hangs with both the tarp and hammock but no overnighters yet as FL is still miserable.  Actually I was all set to drive up the Springer last Monday. Had reservations at the Hiker Hostel (now barefoot inn) and was going to do Springer to Neels just to test drive the gear. The weather is really starting to get nice in N GA and I was hoping for some 30-40 degree sleeping weather.  

Irma has put the kibosh on that plan and as of now I'm evac'd off the beach waiting to get hit tomorrow.

It's the single layer 1.6 and packs up nicely. I thought I was going to have to use my GG Crown but my Z pack ARC Blast packed up all the hammock gear and 3.5 days worth of gear and food nicely.
Link Posted: 9/11/2017 1:08:49 PM EDT
[#12]
Spent the night this weekend in my el cheapo hammock setup for the first time on a scout campout.  Used Eno tree straps, a hammock with integral mosquito net that I bought off of Woot!, and a free Harbor Freight tarp as a rainfly.

The low Saturday night was ~58°F.  I put a closed-cell milsurp foam pad and poncho liner in the bottom of the hammock. Unzipped my North Face down sleeping bag and used it as a blanket on top so if I got too hot I could get out from under it.

I slept pretty well and really enjoyed waking up first thing and being able to see what was going on in camp, sitting up and slipping my shoes on, and being ready to go.  Much better than having to low-crawl out of a tent.

I'm willing to try this more.  Next step will be to get a legit rainfly longer than my hammock and then maybe an underquilt as the weather gets cooler.

Link Posted: 9/11/2017 10:53:40 PM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
What does the Warbonnet hammock offer over an ENO hammock? I've used an ENO hammock for field problems over the last year.  It has worked fine, especially when I use it with my tarp strung over the top of the hammock as a rain block.  I almost bought one of the Warbonnet, but went with the cheaper ENO.  I'm getting ready to deploy and am considering picking up a Warbonnet.  Is it worth the extra money?  Thanks for your feedback.
View Quote
1.  More length (= flatter lay)
2.  Integrated bugnet (lighter and simpler)
3.  Storage shelf
4.  Cinch buckle suspension (lighter and more adjustable) 
5.  Dual layer models which allows you to put a foam or blow up air pad without it slipping around. 
Link Posted: 9/12/2017 12:58:14 AM EDT
[#14]
There's other great hammocks out there beside the Blackbird. Here is a Dream Hammock double layer Sparrow. Dream Hammocks are 100% custom and built to order. Pick your colors / options and they make it for you.





I'm really digging the blue plaid!

Link Posted: 9/12/2017 6:56:25 AM EDT
[#15]
Scooter, I usually put my tarp over my hammock.....
Link Posted: 9/12/2017 7:05:12 AM EDT
[#16]
No hammock for me...I can't sleep on my back.
Link Posted: 9/12/2017 10:42:10 AM EDT
[#17]
I can, but in a hammock I'm usually on my side.
Link Posted: 9/13/2017 2:49:34 AM EDT
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
No hammock for me...I can't sleep on my back.
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I can't sleep on my back in bed, but in a hammock I sleep on my back very comfortably. I do wake up sometimes on my side in the morning.

A good name brand hammock (Warbonnet, dutchwear, dream hammock) holds their value really well and is worth the price to try. I see $200 hammocks selling used on Hammockforums.com for 80-90% all the time. Hell, you could save a few bucks and buy a used one just to try. Not going to kill ya. 

The biggest down side for new hammock hangers is the insulation needed to keep you back/butt warm. If you have a camping type sleeping pad, that works just fine.
Link Posted: 9/13/2017 3:30:24 AM EDT
[#19]
I can hang out in this thread

Link Posted: 9/13/2017 9:49:41 AM EDT
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I can't sleep on my back in bed, but in a hammock I sleep on my back very comfortably. I do wake up sometimes on my side in the morning.

A good name brand hammock (Warbonnet, dutchwear, dream hammock) holds their value really well and is worth the price to try. I see $200 hammocks selling used on Hammockforums.com for 80-90% all the time. Hell, you could save a few bucks and buy a used one just to try. Not going to kill ya. 

The biggest down side for new hammock hangers is the insulation needed to keep you back/butt warm. If you have a camping type sleeping pad, that works just fine.
View Quote
I've bought two Hennessy's and a Warbonnet used online and they are all like new.  They weren't steals, but beat paying a new price.
Link Posted: 9/13/2017 9:59:48 AM EDT
[#21]
I've had luck sleeping in sub 32 deg weather in a hammock, which makes them 4 season around SEUS.

I put a 3" inflatable sleeping pad under a 3 piece military sleeping system and it worked great, even on the side of a mountain.

I've never tried an underquilt, but I expect it would do just as well.
Link Posted: 9/13/2017 9:57:48 PM EDT
[#22]
Another great cottage vendor to check out is Simply Light Designs.  He makes great tarps, hammocks, and accessories.   I bought a nice asym tarp from him, and most recently bought this 12 foot,  1.6 Hexon hammock with a removable nanonoseum bugnet. 

Total weight in stuff sack with everything to hang it is 20oz.  Being 12', it's a palace of a hammock. 

Link Posted: 9/14/2017 1:59:07 AM EDT
[#23]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Another great cottage vendor to check out is Simply Light Designs. 
View Quote
 I've heard nothing but good things about their hammocks.
Link Posted: 10/29/2017 5:05:52 PM EDT
[#24]
I recently placed an order from UGQ Outdoors. I was in the market for a set of quilts, top and bottom. I wanted Enlightened, nearly went Hammockgear, but then found this mfgr in Michigan. Like many of us, I love my state and will pay a little extra to keep the money in state, so I am now the proud owner-in-waiting of their goods
Link Posted: 11/2/2017 10:34:20 PM EDT
[#25]
UGQ is good stuff! You chose wisely.
Link Posted: 11/3/2017 10:50:42 AM EDT
[#26]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I've had luck sleeping in sub 32 deg weather in a hammock, which makes them 4 season around SEUS.

I put a 3" inflatable sleeping pad under a 3 piece military sleeping system and it worked great, even on the side of a mountain.

I've never tried an underquilt, but I expect it would do just as well.
View Quote
Here's what I don't understand about quilts.  They're so fucking short.  I made my own down under quilt from a kit, I bought the shell, bought down, stuffed it myself, because it was the longest one I could find.  It's still short.  I made a top quilt from scratch with nylon and thermaloft, and it works ok.

The shitty thing about underquilts, or, maybe you guys can help me out here, is I can't rig a decent suspension for them that keeps them sucked up to my shoulders or feet.  No matter how I hang them, shock cord, loops, I always end up with a gap.  I can tolerate the gap at my feet, but not under my shoulders, because inevitably that's the direction the 25F breeze is going to come from.

The quilt is warm as fuck.  But rigging it seems impossible and it's barely long enough to cover me shoulders to feet.  I don't know WTF those 3-4' long quilts are good for.
Link Posted: 11/3/2017 10:59:56 PM EDT
[#27]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Here's what I don't understand about quilts.  They're so fucking short.  I made my own down under quilt from a kit, I bought the shell, bought down, stuffed it myself, because it was the longest one I could find.  It's still short.  I made a top quilt from scratch with nylon and thermaloft, and it works ok.

The shitty thing about underquilts, or, maybe you guys can help me out here, is I can't rig a decent suspension for them that keeps them sucked up to my shoulders or feet.  No matter how I hang them, shock cord, loops, I always end up with a gap.  I can tolerate the gap at my feet, but not under my shoulders, because inevitably that's the direction the 25F breeze is going to come from.

The quilt is warm as fuck.  But rigging it seems impossible and it's barely long enough to cover me shoulders to feet.  I don't know WTF those 3-4' long quilts are good for.
View Quote
There are 3/4 length quilts out there for people who sacrifice foot and head coverage for weight/space considerations.  I'm not one of them!
I have a HG quilt in Long form, and it works for me.  I'm a bit over 6ft, and it covers head to toe, if I am angled.  Personally, I don't think head coverage for an underquilt really matters.  I sleep with a small pillow and beanie anyway.  I do care about foot coverage.  My feet get cold easily...so much so that I bought down "socks."

Is your suspension going up over the sides of your hammock?  It seems if it is under the hammock, you get more gaps/shifting.
Link Posted: 11/3/2017 11:20:57 PM EDT
[#28]
I've never had a problem with my UQ sagging. I clip it to my whoopieslings and it pulls up right against the bottom of the hammock when I get in. fwiw, Dutchware also sells quilt hooks you can sew onto the sides to help hold it in place.

I love my hammocks. All twelve of them. I hate the ground.
Link Posted: 11/4/2017 1:20:34 AM EDT
[#29]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Here's what I don't understand about quilts.  They're so fucking short.  I made my own down under quilt from a kit, I bought the shell, bought down, stuffed it myself, because it was the longest one I could find.  It's still short.  I made a top quilt from scratch with nylon and thermaloft, and it works ok.

The shitty thing about underquilts, or, maybe you guys can help me out here, is I can't rig a decent suspension for them that keeps them sucked up to my shoulders or feet.  No matter how I hang them, shock cord, loops, I always end up with a gap.  I can tolerate the gap at my feet, but not under my shoulders, because inevitably that's the direction the 25F breeze is going to come from.

The quilt is warm as fuck.  But rigging it seems impossible and it's barely long enough to cover me shoulders to feet.  I don't know WTF those 3-4' long quilts are good for.
View Quote
@Kuraki

Adjusting Secondary Suspension on a Full Length UnderQuilt


Hammock Under-Quilts Re-Visited.....Bonus: Karl meets Doyle
Link Posted: 11/4/2017 1:50:08 PM EDT
[#30]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Here's what I don't understand about quilts.  They're so fucking short.  I made my own down under quilt from a kit, I bought the shell, bought down, stuffed it myself, because it was the longest one I could find.  It's still short.  I made a top quilt from scratch with nylon and thermaloft, and it works ok.

The shitty thing about underquilts, or, maybe you guys can help me out here, is I can't rig a decent suspension for them that keeps them sucked up to my shoulders or feet.  No matter how I hang them, shock cord, loops, I always end up with a gap.  I can tolerate the gap at my feet, but not under my shoulders, because inevitably that's the direction the 25F breeze is going to come from.

The quilt is warm as fuck.  But rigging it seems impossible and it's barely long enough to cover me shoulders to feet.  I don't know WTF those 3-4' long quilts are good for.
View Quote
The place I ordered from offers them up to 83" in length.
Link Posted: 11/5/2017 9:51:31 AM EDT
[#31]
Any of the cottage vendors can make what you need.

I've got quilts from Underground Quilts, Hammockgear, and Arrowhead Equipment.
Link Posted: 11/6/2017 5:37:59 PM EDT
[#32]
Mostly ENO.

Link Posted: 11/6/2017 5:58:11 PM EDT
[#33]


From left to right that's a OuterEQ, BearButt double, and ENO Single Nest. One night I slept in the BearButt with a foam mat, ENO under quilt, and a mummy bag over me. Second night I slept in the ENO with the same gear. In this pic the first two have a 20° sleeping bag with the bottom open to cocoon the sleepers (two of my kids).

There is a ton of inexpensive hammock gear out there these days. I am a big guy (6' 1" / 270#) and the single ENO or double BearButt slept fine. I only have maybe 10 nights in a hammock, but find it to be the most comfortable camp sleeping, hands down. Worst case, if I have to go to ground I can setup the hammock as an improvised bivvy.
Link Posted: 11/6/2017 6:02:35 PM EDT
[#34]
Caesars head this past Saturday
Link Posted: 11/6/2017 6:06:43 PM EDT
[#35]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I can't sleep on my back in bed, but in a hammock I sleep on my back very comfortably. I do wake up sometimes on my side in the morning.

A good name brand hammock (Warbonnet, dutchwear, dream hammock) holds their value really well and is worth the price to try. I see $200 hammocks selling used on Hammockforums.com for 80-90% all the time. Hell, you could save a few bucks and buy a used one just to try. Not going to kill ya. 

The biggest down side for new hammock hangers is the insulation needed to keep you back/butt warm. If you have a camping type sleeping pad, that works just fine.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
No hammock for me...I can't sleep on my back.
I can't sleep on my back in bed, but in a hammock I sleep on my back very comfortably. I do wake up sometimes on my side in the morning.

A good name brand hammock (Warbonnet, dutchwear, dream hammock) holds their value really well and is worth the price to try. I see $200 hammocks selling used on Hammockforums.com for 80-90% all the time. Hell, you could save a few bucks and buy a used one just to try. Not going to kill ya. 

The biggest down side for new hammock hangers is the insulation needed to keep you back/butt warm. If you have a camping type sleeping pad, that works just fine.
I have this inexpensive pad I got from Walmart, specifically because it was the widest thing around.  It helps give me a little shape for that diagonal sleep position, and I was comfortable on my back or on my side.

I was scared about the prices of all the Gucci brands, hell even dropping $75 on my first ENO seemed like a risk considering I already had "camping gear".  Check out all these new companies on Amazon, there is a ton of great, inexpensive gear available.
Link Posted: 11/6/2017 6:21:05 PM EDT
[#36]
Get started cheap:
Goto Amazon, get a BearButt double for about $30 and BearButt Kodiak straps for about $20.

Goto Walmart, get this 25" wide camping pad here, $17.  Or use whatever you have. Use the pad to help shape out the diagonal sleeping position and to provide some insulation.

Top quilt? take your regular bag, zip it up maybe knee height to make a "foot box". Tuck it under you a bit if needed, but the compressed insulation doesn't work very well.

This gets you a taste of hammocking on the cheap. It is pretty much what I did my first couple of times, lowes down in the 50°'s.  With the foam pad and the ENO under quilt I was toasty in the 40°'s.  I want to try colder at some point, I expect to be OK.
Link Posted: 11/7/2017 2:40:25 AM EDT
[#37]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Get started cheap:
Goto Amazon, get a BearButt double for about $30 and BearButt Kodiak straps for about $20.
View Quote
Looks like the hammock and Kodiak straps are $50. Another "cheap" option:
LINK TO HAMMOCK
Here is a USA made, Warbonnet Traveler XL hammock with straps/buckles/ridgeline for $70
<a>

</a>
Link Posted: 11/7/2017 4:05:26 AM EDT
[#38]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Looks like the hammock and Kodiak straps are $50. Another "cheap" option:

Here is a USA made, Warbonnet Traveler hammock with straps/buckles/ridgeline for $60.

https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/product/travelers-no-net-ridgerunners/

https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/p-98-DSCN1101__63468.jpg
View Quote
Dammit, that's another $65 I'm going to blow (Single layer XL, web slings look great and really don't even need a carabiner). Interested in checking out a ridgeline hammock; didn't even know of this model when I got my ENO back in 2015.

Like everything on this fucking site, once you get a taste you end up with multiple levels of gear.
Link Posted: 11/7/2017 9:00:46 AM EDT
[#39]
Another inexpensive option is Butt In a Sling. I can't remember if I have the Gram Weenie or Micro. It's less than 7 oz and comfy. More of my toss anywhere hammock.

My current go-to is my Thunderbird. Love this hammock. It's by far my most versatile. I also love my Lite Owl from Wilderness Logics. The material is absolutely dreamy.
Link Posted: 12/11/2017 8:55:56 PM EDT
[#40]
Went this weekend.  It was a great time to test my underquilt.  It is a hammock gear burrow 20 degree with an extra oz of fill.  Temps were supposed to get to 15 but actually only got to around 19 or 20.  . I honestly hoped for colder cause I wanted to test it more.  But anyways, even at 20 I was toasty warm.  Seriously slept fantastic.  The thing just works and the talk about it being conservatively rated are correct.
Link Posted: 12/14/2017 2:03:25 AM EDT
[#41]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Went this weekend.  It was a great time to test my underquilt.  It is a hammock gear burrow 20 degree with an extra oz of fill.  Temps were supposed to get to 15 but actually only got to around 19 or 20.  . I honestly hoped for colder cause I wanted to test it more.  But anyways, even at 20 I was toasty warm.  Seriously slept fantastic.  The thing just works and the talk about it being conservatively rated are correct.
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Good to hear. BigDaddy from the ARF Ham forum just got the same quilt a little over a week ago. He was laying in it while talking to us on the Friday night net.

He said it was in the 20's and there was frost on the tarp and on the ground. He kept saying how warm he was. But now that I am thinking about it, he was drinking goldschlager so that might have skewed his quilt report.
Link Posted: 12/17/2017 9:59:49 AM EDT
[#42]
I spent last night in my backyard woods in my Hennessy Deluxe Explorer Classic.  I pitched my Hex fly instead of the standard Hennessy fly for more coverage bc it was 100% chance of rain.  The low got down to 48° and I used my homemade Costco down throw "Gemini" underquilt.  I stayed perfectly warm and dry and last night's test reinforced that I continue to prefer hammock camping to tent camping.
Link Posted: 12/17/2017 11:40:43 AM EDT
[#43]
Well done.
Link Posted: 12/17/2017 2:47:53 PM EDT
[#44]
I think it about 11:30 and I'm still in my hammock.

I'm about to get up and head to the nearest town to get some breakfast. Slept good. It wasn't very cold last night, low 40s when I went to bed and freezing at 6am. Perfectly warm all night. I slept almost 11 hours.

Picture from one minute ago in Utah.

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 1/6/2018 12:27:12 AM EDT
[#45]
I'm just dropping this picture here till I found out how its being hosted. I just did a screen capture in my browser and it saved itself on line. I don't want to lose the link.

Link Posted: 1/6/2018 8:54:36 AM EDT
[#46]
Appalachian trail, Oct of last year in northern Ga.

Most everything is some sort of off brand except the pack, that is all american large alice. Heavy but tough.
Link Posted: 1/8/2018 6:52:59 PM EDT
[#47]
I have a couple of ENO hammocks, which I find comfortable. I need an underquilt.  Camping in the Adirondacks can get chilly.
Link Posted: 1/8/2018 9:24:28 PM EDT
[#48]
I'm getting into backpacking and I think a hammock setup would be a hell of alot better than sleeping on the ground. Ive got an inexpensive hammock inbound from Amazon. I'll try it out in the backyard for a bit. If things go well, Ill upgrade to some better gear.I'll  run some tree straps and a marlin spike hitch for the hammock and a continuous ridge line for the tarp.
Also has anyone used this type of setup while elk hunting?
Link Posted: 1/14/2018 1:56:14 AM EDT
[#49]
So how's the back support factor in a hammock? I usually sleep on the ground (with a bag & pad) when camping, and prefer a firm mattress at home....would I wake up with a backache if I tried a night in a hammock?
Link Posted: 1/14/2018 10:56:10 AM EDT
[#50]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
So how's the back support factor in a hammock? I usually sleep on the ground (with a bag & pad) when camping, and prefer a firm mattress at home....would I wake up with a backache if I tried a night in a hammock?
View Quote
The great thing about a hammock is it completely supports your body. There aren't any pressure points.

I know several people who had back surgery and replaced the beds in the homes with hammocks because they were able to sleep pain-free.
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