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Posted: 7/17/2007 10:21:41 AM EST
I'm looking to purchase some food storage buckets.

This is the best price I can find so far - Affordable Buckets

Question about the lids.
They come in two designs:
1) Cut Tab
2) Tear Tab

Is one better for long term opening and closing?

Thanks in advance!
Link Posted: 7/17/2007 11:31:18 AM EST
No. But you might prefer one or the other for ease of opening.

Link Posted: 7/17/2007 11:49:33 AM EST
I know where to get them at a way better price than that. FREE!!! Sams club, Costco, Bakeries, most places that deal with food give them away for free becuase they were throwing them away anyway. Sams get's tons of them a year, you have to wash the cake icing out of them first, but hell, it was free. Just thought I would share that with ya as a possible option.
Link Posted: 7/17/2007 6:33:41 PM EST
Don't know where to buy but they make lids that are two piece. The bottom piece attaches to the bucket with a snap and then a screw on piece with an o-ring seal screws into it.
Link Posted: 7/17/2007 6:38:06 PM EST
Go to a local bakery.

They have oodles of them.
Link Posted: 7/17/2007 6:47:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/17/2007 6:49:32 PM EST by Ranchhand365]
Good idea about Costco.

I had the local Burger King save me some. As I was walking out the door the manger said "By the way, I wouldn't put food in those. We put degreaser in them and cleaned the floor".

Gee.... thanks for mentioning that!
After that I figured new would be the way to go.
I'll call Costco tommorow - they should be cool.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 7/17/2007 10:09:11 PM EST
Why do you need food grade? You ARE going to seal the food in mylar bags, aren't you?
I use buckets that formerly contained stucco and top coat--get 'em for free from a contractor. That leaves me plenty of cash for Gamma lids.

Ulrik
Link Posted: 7/18/2007 3:23:58 AM EST
Thats a good point, if you are going to be storing say rice in vacuumed sealed bags does it batter if the bucket is food grade or not?
Link Posted: 7/18/2007 9:20:40 AM EST
This is new to me and I don’t have a good plan. I have just been keeping ‘food’ around without real organization. We have a lot of can food that we eat on a regular basis. We have chickens, goats and a horse (yes I would eat but would probably be better used with the saddle or the driving harness), hundreds of quail and rabbits running around (neighbors would compete for this) and a small garden (eat fresh - no canning).

My current procedure is to buy rice and beans from Costco and throw it out every six months. I dump the stuff in the chicken pen and it all disappears…. eventually. The chickens, Magpies or ground squirrels must eat it.

My plan was to use the food grade buckets and throw in a chunk of dry ice to drive the oxygen out.

How important is the Mylar?
How much does extend the storage life?

Any suggestions on where to learn about the storage life of various grains?
Link Posted: 7/18/2007 5:37:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By Ranchhand365:
How important is the Mylar?
How much does extend the storage life?
Any suggestions on where to learn about the storage life of various grains?


+1
Link Posted: 7/18/2007 6:40:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By arolfsen:

Originally Posted By Ranchhand365:
How important is the Mylar?
How much does extend the storage life?
Any suggestions on where to learn about the storage life of various grains?


+1


Someone in the know about this type of thing should start a new thread and get it stickyed. Unless of course there already is one... but since i see folks asking about this from time to time, I am pretty sire there isn't. We get the occasional posts about food preservation, like the great one the other day about canning, but a good compiled thread would be some good one stop shopping. Just an idea.

jim
Link Posted: 7/18/2007 7:38:44 PM EST
I have picked up several buckets from Costco. What you need to ask or look for are the bucket lids with the rubber seals back in the bakery. We rotate our stock and have rice or beans in a bucket for an average of 2 years. Everything stays fresh, and thats with opening the bucket to get the food out. No mylar needed but nitro packs recommended.
Link Posted: 7/18/2007 8:54:02 PM EST
If you want to buy new Wally world has them for $3 and some change.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 3:09:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By NexQuietus:

Originally Posted By arolfsen:

Originally Posted By Ranchhand365:
How important is the Mylar?
How much does extend the storage life?
Any suggestions on where to learn about the storage life of various grains?


+1


Someone in the know about this type of thing should start a new thread and get it stickyed. Unless of course there already is one... but since i see folks asking about this from time to time, I am pretty sire there isn't. We get the occasional posts about food preservation, like the great one the other day about canning, but a good compiled thread would be some good one stop shopping. Just an idea.

jim


i'll second the sticky idea....
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 3:52:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By Ranchhand365:
This is new to me and I don’t have a good plan. I have just been keeping ‘food’ around without real organization. We have a lot of can food that we eat on a regular basis. We have chickens, goats and a horse (yes I would eat but would probably be better used with the saddle or the driving harness), hundreds of quail and rabbits running around (neighbors would compete for this) and a small garden (eat fresh - no canning).

My current procedure is to buy rice and beans from Costco and throw it out every six months. I dump the stuff in the chicken pen and it all disappears…. eventually. The chickens, Magpies or ground squirrels must eat it.

My plan was to use the food grade buckets and throw in a chunk of dry ice to drive the oxygen out.

How important is the Mylar?
How much does extend the storage life?

Any suggestions on where to learn about the storage life of various grains?


Basically this is what I've gleaned from various web sources:

Whole wheat kernals should last about forever. (Some 4000 year old ones were found in the pyramids, and as I understand it were still edible.) Same with Rye.

Rice, at least 5 years.

Beans, at least 5 years.

Oats, not as long because of the oils.

My process is to buy 25-50 pound bags, then put them into 1 gallon freezer zip locks (from costco,) then freeze them for a few days (Kills the bug eggs that may be present) and then put into 5 gallon buckets. As I now have a source of 55 gallon plastic drums, I think I'm going to put wheat in one, rice in another and beans in a third. If I getthose filled, I should have alot of stored food. I like the 1 gallon plastic bags because it breaks it down for use and rotation or charity should SHTF.

This is off the top of my head, and if there are any errors or important info I'm missing, I'd love to be corrected...

Link Posted: 10/9/2007 4:15:25 PM EST
Walmart bakery gives them away too. They even wash them 1st
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 7:06:14 PM EST
some of you guys are just plain lucky, I have asked for buckets at Sams, Wal-Mart, Safeway, King Soopers, and many others, all with the same answer, we don't use those buckets any more.

It is cheeper to buy them at walmart than spend the time trying to get them for free.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 7:35:57 PM EST
I think there are really three different things in play here.

First, if you're just planning to dump the grain into a bucket, yes you want food grade. If you can get the buckets for free from a bakery or Costco, great, but there probably is a bit more risk they aren't entirely suitable because you don't kow how the employees used them.

Second, storing grains in buckets alone is probably fine, lots of people here do it. But adding a mylar bag to the bucket will greatly increase the storage life of the grains, if you do the mylar storage thing correctly. Which is beyond the scope of this thread. If you use a mylar bag, it doesn't matter if the bucket is food grade or not. I actually have mylar bags filled with food and stacked on shelves without buckets, but I don't have any buckets without mylar bags.

Third, the gamma lids are a lot easier to open and re-close than the regular lids. But they're also a LOT more expensive. I don't really see the point of the gamma lids if you're just putting away some grains for a possible future emergency. On the other hand, if you just want to (hopefully) keep the mice out of the stash of rice you regularly eat, it would be a good idea to get a gamma lid for that bucket.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 8:05:06 PM EST
I get them for free from a barbeque place near me. Now all my food smells like barbeque sauce.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 8:38:33 PM EST
I have read that when you freeze rice, etc that you do it for at least 2-3 days. THEN leave it out for 2-3 days , then re-freeze it. This will get any "stragglers" that the first freeze missed. The 2-3 day thaw will trick them into re-vitalizing then the next 2-3 day freeze will kill them!


Also read to make sure to use food grade buckets. Someone stores spaghetti in a orange lowes bucket and later opened it. He had orange spaghetti. No telling what the non-food grade white buckets leech. Oils, release agents from the molding process?? Better safe than sorry. Even if you use mylar who is to say you may flub up and mis-seal it by accident? Then you have essentially open food in a non-food grade container...bad.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 12:51:37 AM EST
step one-
attain one food grade or bukcet of your choice with lid and seal.
step two-
buy your food to store
step- 3 line bag with mylar
step-4
insert food, and O2 abosorbers
step 5-
seal mylar bag
step 6-
put lid on bucket and pound tight
step 7-
wait till shtf.


pretty simple really.

the "frezze metthod is all great and wonderfull BUT think of this.

what happens to a coke can thats been in the fridge when you pull it out. even into your cold a/c'd house.
what do you think that rice and wheat and beans will do? they also will condensate and soak up the moisture...... you may end up with moldy beans and grain! No bugs but your food may be ruined by mold!
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 6:31:43 AM EST
I keep wheat in 5 gallon pails I get from a cookie shop, they used to hold frosting. I clean the old frosting out first so I know there are no issues in terms of what they might have been used for.

I don't personally see the point in mylar sealing wheat. If wheat from the tombs of the pharoahs was sprouted after a couple thousand years, well, I for one plan on being dead for at least the last thousand of that time frame....

If you are going to use mylar then you might consider non food grade buckets or even food grade buckets with odor issues...ie pickle or sauce buckets. BTW, Hooters goes through a TON of bright orange pickle buckets every week!
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 6:36:30 AM EST
This isn't a tag to remind me to buy rice.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 1:13:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/10/2007 1:14:40 PM EST by ar-jedi]


Originally Posted By HS-LD:
My process is to buy 25-50 pound bags, then put them into 1 gallon freezer zip locks (from costco,) then freeze them for a few days (Kills the bug eggs that may be present) and then put into 5 gallon buckets.



Originally Posted By protus:
the "frezze metthod is all great and wonderfull BUT think of this.

what happens to a coke can thats been in the fridge when you pull it out. even into your cold a/c'd house.
what do you think that rice and wheat and beans will do? they also will condensate and soak up the moisture...... you may end up with moldy beans and grain! No bugs but your food may be ruined by mold!


you seal the mylar zip lock bag first, silly.

ar-jedi

Link Posted: 10/10/2007 1:49:01 PM EST
do not throw out the food you store.........'store what you eat, and eat what you store'. thats the whole idea...make sure evrything you store is in your normal diet, esp where kids are concerned. Mylar bags help block oxygen absorption and light. dried grains can last a long time. be careful using dry ice, there is a specific method to using it. if you freeze the grain first it will kill any bugs. All dry grains have some bugs...
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 3:00:09 PM EST
I'm not too keen on used buckets for betting my life on.
Just for the hell of it, I ordered 8 white buckets from ULine. Cost was $30.00 (+$15.01 s/h). Thats just a hair over $5 each. I could have gotten colors if I wanted. They came in less than a week. YMMV
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 3:01:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By huggybro:
Don't know where to buy but they make lids that are two piece. The bottom piece attaches to the bucket with a snap and then a screw on piece with an o-ring seal screws into it.


They are called gamma seal lids.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 5:18:36 PM EST
Get the ones from the grocery bakery. I just stopped at two of the local grocers and said "got any frosting buckets with lids?" The lady says how many you want? I say all you got, mistake, she comes back with 4- 5 gal, 2 in each hand, I say thanks, she says oh there are more. Bottom line I ended up with 25 or so in one haul. She says come back Saturday there will be more.
Moral of the store: if it's free it's for me. I think that puts me around 60 or so food grade buckets, all free. Lids all have the seal in place.
My 02 worth.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 6:45:07 PM EST
I have not had much luck with FREE buckets. Mine where bought from Lowes. Paint department has them. Lids are seperate total cost is about 6$. O2 absorbers can be bought from Honeyville. I have not seen a need for Mylar bags and have used the freezer trick for years. One gallon bags are then put in a larger trash bag and sealed in bucket. For storage space place a piece of plywood on top of buckets for foundation of next layer. 3 levels is as high as I have gone.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 7:17:40 PM EST
I have no personal knowledge here, but I've read, from several seemingly knowledgeable sources, that freezing grain is kind of an iffy way to kill the eggs. The idea seems to be that putting a 10# or 20# bag of rice in your kitchen freezer for a day or two or three, at maybe 15 degrees, isn't going to kill the eggs. Putting the same bags in a top-opening freezer at -10 degrees for a week or 10 days will probably do the trick.

FWIW.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 7:43:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By Handydave:

Originally Posted By huggybro:
Don't know where to buy but they make lids that are two piece. The bottom piece attaches to the bucket with a snap and then a screw on piece with an o-ring seal screws into it.


They are called gamma seal lids.


Link to the gamma seal lids

I haven't tried these myself yet, but it looks like a good idea. I am going to pick up a few and try them out.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 8:59:49 PM EST
I've used the gamma seal lids on the buckets (that I got from the bakery inside local grocery store). Placed the grain (treated with substance called Permagard, [diatomacious earth] which kills all the little buggies by sliceing up their shells and dehydrating them, but is perfectly fine for humans). no freezing necessary. Then flushing with nitrogen and putting in the O2 absorbers, seal with hot iron, and place in buckets. They have been stored since 1999. The corn that I placed in buckets with out treating in the above manner came out molded when I checked everything last month.
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