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Posted: 11/3/2011 12:42:20 PM EDT
Anyone ever make it?

I just started making some last night....If you guys want I could try to post pics....

Would like to know what you did to make it and your success rate....pics would be nice as well.....

Link Posted: 11/3/2011 1:04:40 PM EDT
once you get the hang of making it move on to making charred punk wood ,superior to cloth in every way...FWIW "char cloth" is a more modern adaptation, it was not a typical tinder in the 18th century...it does work well though
Link Posted: 11/3/2011 4:29:42 PM EDT
I used to make mine out of old t-shirts, cut into squares and stuffed into a Nevr Dull tin. Poke a hole in the top and cook slowly on a raised grate over some hot coals. When the smoke quit peein' out the hole, it was done. In my experience, about 50% of a batch was all I could count on to be viable. I have some in a trapper's tin that's over 25 years old and is still good. I used a hunk about a month ago, worked like a charm.
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 9:16:12 AM EDT
Old blue jeans make could char cloth
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 10:01:59 AM EDT
I haven't been able to find a good cloth to do it with. I've made a dozen batches..some worked better than others, but none of them as well as i've seen elsewhere. I bought some from going gear awhile back and it worked perfect, but I haven't been able to find a cloth to duplicate it.
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 4:56:57 PM EDT
Have thought about trying this but just haven't until just now... First attempt the recipe I used was >>>

1) Get a swatch of 100% cotton fabric (I used an old t-shirt but denim is a good choice as well. Any plant based fabric will work - cotton, linen, jute, etc...)

2) Wrap swatch as anaerobically as reasonably possible (by hand) in Reynolds wrap.

3) Cook in toaster oven on the highest temp setting (450 for my toaster oven) for 20 minutes.

4) The resulting char cloth is uniformly charred dark brown / black but is only mediocre in terms of function... not bad for a first attempt actually but definitely needs some improvement. I think that answer will be to just cook it longer. I really don't think that you can overcook it - I'll probably go for 1 hour at 450. One tip would be if you are going to use this method - it is probably a good idea to move the toaster oven outside (porch or patio). A 3" x 1" square gave an interest fragrance to my kitchen.

Link Posted: 11/4/2011 5:19:26 PM EDT
Go to the fabric store, buy MONK'S CLOTH. Cut into swatches, put in Altoids can, set it on the grill for 20-30 minutes. Made some last week, the monk's cloth has a deep "waffle" like weave that catches and holds the spark extremely well!
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 6:22:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Reorx:
Have thought about trying this but just haven't until just now... First attempt the recipe I used was >>>

1) Get a swatch of 100% cotton fabric (I used an old t-shirt but denim is a good choice as well. Any plant based fabric will work - cotton, linen, jute, etc...)

2) Wrap swatch as anaerobically as reasonably possible (by hand) in Reynolds wrap.

3) Cook in toaster oven on the highest temp setting (450 for my toaster oven) for 20 minutes.

4) The resulting char cloth is uniformly charred dark brown / black but is only mediocre in terms of function... not bad for a first attempt actually but definitely needs some improvement. I think that answer will be to just cook it longer. I really don't think that you can overcook it - I'll probably go for 1 hour at 450. One tip would be if you are going to use this method - it is probably a good idea to move the toaster oven outside (porch or patio). A 3" x 1" square gave an interest fragrance to my kitchen.

http://newturfers.com/mwf/attach/5/578405/Composite.jpg


You CAN overcook it, so careful! If you overcook it, you don't have that cloth texture. It just crumbles apart and is extremely brittle.
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 6:40:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ThePatriot556:
Go to the fabric store, buy MONK'S CLOTH. Cut into swatches, put in Altoids can, set it on the grill for 20-30 minutes. Made some last week, the monk's cloth has a deep "waffle" like weave that catches and holds the spark extremely well!


I've not used it but I've used lots of cheese cloth . I 'd say cotton gause would work fine too . It has that open weave that catches sparks very well too .
Link Posted: 11/4/2011 7:08:18 PM EDT
I use cotton gun patches. Right size for the altoids tin.
Link Posted: 11/20/2011 4:39:14 PM EDT
I have made char cloth for years as a Boy Scout leader. All of you who have tried cotton Tshirts are correct; it comes out very flimsy and doesn't catch a spark very well. Best thing I have found is the cotton webbing belts are made from (Boy Scout & military webbing). It is thick and woven and doesn't fall apart so much. It's also full of nooks & crannies to catch sparks. Webbing can be bought in 50 ft. rolls at fabric stores. I make char cloth in an Altoids tin. Use a nail to poke 8 or 10 small holes in the lid. Load with some webbing squares, place over flame or hot coals. When smoke stops coming from the holes, it's done. Store in a baggie with some desiccant. Char cloth doesn't burn, it just makes a burning coal. Use it to ignite your tinder. One more tip. Dryer lint doesn't make very good tinder. It used to be, before modern synthetic fabrics. Synthetics don't burn - they melt. The lint must be cotton, wool or some other natural fiber. Best tinder? Cotton balls impregnated with vasoline jelly. So go ahead and earn your char cloth merit badge !
Link Posted: 11/20/2011 6:36:25 PM EDT
cotton canvas....Kiwi tin.....bent coat hanger....tea candle....
Link Posted: 11/20/2011 6:42:42 PM EDT
I made mine in a quart paint can (with dried paint) using T shirt cloth a a 1/16" vent hole. Never had any issues.
Link Posted: 11/21/2011 1:17:40 AM EDT
This reminds me I need to make some. I've taken to carrying a 9v battery and some steel wool in my BOB until I can make some char cloth.
Link Posted: 11/21/2011 3:51:28 AM EDT
I suppose making char cloth is a viable skill, but I never found any real use for it. Dryer lint works better as tinder, and all you have to do is harvest it from the dryer screen.
Link Posted: 11/21/2011 8:33:34 AM EDT
I had a tough time getting good quality for my vulcan fire piston, (compressed air piston fire starter)

It is as much an art as anything. I had good success with cotton t-shirts and cotton jeans, and an Altoids tin over a controlable flame. The smoke coming out of the hole you punch in the container should reduce before you even check it. And try not to put to much in as the cooking will be uneven and will leave some over cooked and some undercooked. I use 3-4 pieces at most on each batch.

Even bad char cloth will take a spark from quality fire steel, but real flint and steel, and the air pressure devices require some pretty quality stuff. I check each batch before I bag it for use. I probably make 2-3 small batches a year.
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