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7/8/2020 3:01:36 PM
Posted: 4/29/2009 4:48:58 PM EDT
Thought I would share these, this might add to your list of reasons on why we prep.

These are old photos of FEMA preps handed out at FEMA PODs or Point of Distribution centers in south Florida after hurricane Wilma. People would wait in line for a couple of hours to receive two cases of water and two 10# bags of ICE and a box of crappy food. They had a couple of tractor trailers setup with ICE and water and food.

I could not believe the amount of people that were in these lines, all for nothing really.

Here it is.

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv219/sellmytires/wilma1.jpg

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv219/sellmytires/wilma2.jpg

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv219/sellmytires/wilma3.jpg

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv219/sellmytires/wilma4.jpg

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv219/sellmytires/wilma5.jpg

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv219/sellmytires/wilma6.jpg

Budweiser canned this water (how kind of them) that FEMA distrubed it was like drinking bad tap water from a can (maybe slightly filtered pond water)
neighbor let me try some, I think it would of been way cooler if they just gave away free Budweiser instead.

Sorry for the random pic sizes.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 4:53:07 PM EDT
Budweiser canned those? Makes you think twice about all the "uber clean glacier spring water" crap on the commercials
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 4:53:22 PM EDT
I don't think you EVER get used to drinking water from a can
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 5:02:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2009 5:03:46 PM EDT by UH_SALT_RIFLE]
Damn what a crappy food selection.

Local official: "We have an EMERGENCY, Hurricanes have wiped out 10's of thousands of homes"

FEMA: "Don't worry, we'll send Pringles and canned water"
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 5:03:14 PM EDT
I have seen these before.





Link Posted: 4/29/2009 5:06:14 PM EDT
"Why we prep"

Right there.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 5:09:04 PM EDT


I've been to that plant LOTS of times
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 6:58:19 PM EDT
They gave us(National Guard) canned water after Andrew.
It was wierd drinking it from a can.
It looked like he white can in the post a few up.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 7:08:20 PM EDT


A local gun store here has cases of these sitting around.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 7:30:15 PM EDT
Was FEMA behind this?

Link Posted: 4/29/2009 7:38:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2009 7:39:07 PM EDT by echosierra3]
Ole' Billy, I remember when he visited his brother in the White House, he used to piss off one of the outdoor porches onto the grounds. And was proud to tell you about it!
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 11:41:38 PM EDT
Pringles and mother-fucking Beeforoni!  They give you that shit for FREE!

I've been doing this shit wrong.  I could put my wife and my two kids in line, we could each get a box, I would then send the kids back for other boxes, I would then eat like a king and I didn't have to do shit.  You know what I need?  More fucking kids.  I need to find some young and dumb welfare momma who started shitting kids at 16, we could have a castle made out of canned water and aluminium cans.

Can't believe our Government gives that shit out for free!  No wonder motherfuckers don't want to work.  For anything...
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 1:04:22 AM EDT



Just in case anyone would like a little history on these. My Dad was a career fireman in SoCal. Several years ago he was dispathed to the forest fires near Mammoth, CA. For whatever reason drinking water for the tousands of firman were in short supply. It was a dire emergency. SOOO, Budweiser shut down one of their plants from all beer canning and started canning tousands upon thousands of these cans of water for them. According to Dad when your fighting a fire in a can or whatever, water is water and it will keep you alive.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 3:14:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2009 3:14:50 AM EDT by FrankSymptoms]
My brother (a Mormon) was sent to help with Hurricane Andrew. He went to a member's house (or what remained of it) and was a little appalled to see piles of crushed Bud cans outside the guy's house. Turns out that when the hurricane hit, they turned off the beer and start canning tap water; they don't bother to clean out the new, unfilled beer cans. They put lables on the cases and ship them that way.

And they do this for free! I understand that Coors does the same thing. They also pay for the shipping: they'll load several semi trailers full of water and ship them where they're needed. Sounds like they are good corporate neighbors at time of crisis.

Water is water; it'll keep you alive, and, after breathable air and (arguably) shelter, is the most important item to consider after a disaster. And, believe me, when you've been working in a hot, humid climate (like Florida, post-Andrew), even crappy-tasting water can be a blessing.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 4:10:42 AM EDT
I volunteer in disaster relief and run a chainsaw/tractor at least 3-4 times a year.

That water and those pringles are straight up food of the gods.

see it for yourself, then you'll understand.

The pictures of all the disasters folks have put up here and on other sites, only really show approx 10% of the "real feel" of being boots on ground. I've never had to ride out a major disaster, but I've been to/sweated/bled and helped in several dozen now shortly afterwards and it leaves me in awe for several different reasons every single time we deploy.


My hats off to the folks that bounce back without trying to milk the .gov
My hats off to the folks that  help themselves and their neighbors
My hats off to the folks that go and volunteer without seeking gloryification
My hats off to the business' that actually donate supplies without filing or receiving tax kickbacks

Godspeed and prayers for the prepared and the concerned.



*if you are interested in helping check with Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, Red Cross, Salvation Army, Citizens Corp and your local volunteer firefighters or sherrifs patrols
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 1:35:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FlatlinesUp:
I volunteer in disaster relief and run a chainsaw/tractor at least 3-4 times a year.

That water and those pringles are straight up food of the gods.

see it for yourself, then you'll understand.

The pictures of all the disasters folks have put up here and on other sites, only really show approx 10% of the "real feel" of being boots on ground. I've never had to ride out a major disaster, but I've been to/sweated/bled and helped in several dozen now shortly afterwards and it leaves me in awe for several different reasons every single time we deploy.


My hats off to the folks that bounce back without trying to milk the .gov
My hats off to the folks that  help themselves and their neighbors
My hats off to the folks that go and volunteer without seeking gloryification
My hats off to the business' that actually donate supplies without filing or receiving tax kickbacks

Godspeed and prayers for the prepared and the concerned.



*if you are interested in helping check with Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, Red Cross, Salvation Army, Citizens Corp and your local volunteer firefighters or sherrifs patrols


Well Said.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 6:32:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
My brother (a Mormon) was sent to help with Hurricane Andrew. He went to a member's house (or what remained of it) and was a little appalled to see piles of crushed Bud cans outside the guy's house. Turns out that when the hurricane hit, they turned off the beer and start canning tap water; they don't bother to clean out the new, unfilled beer cans. They put lables on the cases and ship them that way.

And they do this for free! I understand that Coors does the same thing. They also pay for the shipping: they'll load several semi trailers full of water and ship them where they're needed. Sounds like they are good corporate neighbors at time of crisis.

Water is water; it'll keep you alive, and, after breathable air and (arguably) shelter, is the most important item to consider after a disaster. And, believe me, when you've been working in a hot, humid climate (like Florida, post-Andrew), even crappy-tasting water can be a blessing.


Or in full riot gear...
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