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Posted: 9/10/2013 11:00:50 AM EDT
OK...heavy rain makes my Dish TV drop out, yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength.

Somebody 'splain dis to me....
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 11:23:17 AM EDT
Some wireless equipment will automatically boost power when it senses some nodes are not getting enough signal. If it boosts power to get the furthest node enough signal to operate then other closer nodes will see better signal strength.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 11:28:48 AM EDT
22,500 miles vs 20.
Inverse square law vs distance.
Sustainable solar powered lightweight transmitter vs commercial power/battery bank/ how many watts you want?

...are all factors.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 12:16:11 PM EDT
Quoted:
OK...heavy rain makes my Dish TV drop out, yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength.

Somebody 'splain dis to me....
View Quote



DTV guy told me that if rain kills the signal that is less than an outright downpour, the dish needs adjustment.  A light rain shouldn't kill the signal.

Link Posted: 9/10/2013 12:18:55 PM EDT
Actually a wet antenna works better for transmitting because the rain acts like a lubricant and the radio waves slip off of it faster.

For receiving a wet antenna isn't as good as a dry one because many of the waves that hit it will slip off of it because ot water's lubricity.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 12:37:13 PM EDT

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Quoted:


Actually a wet antenna works better for transmitting because the rain acts like a lubricant and the radio waves slip off of it faster.



For receiving a wet antenna isn't as good as a dry one because many of the waves that hit it will slip off of it because ot water's lubricity.
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What a conundrum.  If I wrap all my antennas with electrical tape so the electrons squirt out the tip faster, does that mean that I'm also depriving the antenna of precipitative lubricity?



 
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 1:42:29 PM EDT
Quoted:
OK...heavy rain makes my Dish TV drop out
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Water does attenuates the radio signal at the frequencies used for direct broadcast satellite.  Put enough water in the air between the satellite and your antenna, signal will drop below usable levels for the satellite receivers.

yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength.
View Quote

Wifi signal meters sometimes show signal to noise ratio instead of raw signal strength.  2.4GHz energy is absorbed by water (microwave ovens) so long path signal would probably suffer, but you may just be seeing a drop in noise level from long distances away, allowing a local signal to have a better s/n ratio.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 2:21:43 PM EDT
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What a conundrum.  If I wrap all my antennas with electrical tape so the electrons squirt out the tip faster, does that mean that I'm also depriving the antenna of precipitative lubricity?
 
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Actually a wet antenna works better for transmitting because the rain acts like a lubricant and the radio waves slip off of it faster.

For receiving a wet antenna isn't as good as a dry one because many of the waves that hit it will slip off of it because ot water's lubricity.
What a conundrum.  If I wrap all my antennas with electrical tape so the electrons squirt out the tip faster, does that mean that I'm also depriving the antenna of precipitative lubricity?
 




Yes. And your signal will shoot out in the direction of the antenna tips.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:19:40 AM EDT
You have it all wrong.  For better direction pattern, tape pennies to the radiators.  Be sure the older dated pennies are closest to the feed point.

Link Posted: 9/11/2013 6:00:12 AM EDT
Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 6:22:35 AM EDT

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Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.
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So will Teflon spray.  Also they do make heated dishes.



 
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 7:52:17 AM EDT
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So will Teflon spray.  Also they do make heated dishes.
 
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Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.
So will Teflon spray.  Also they do make heated dishes.
 


I have a POE panel antenna that has a temp sensor and heater pad in it.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 10:16:41 AM EDT
Quoted:
yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength
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At least part of that signal is reaching you via reflection off something - buildings, trees, the ground, etc.

So - At those particular frequencies, do wet surfaces reflect more of the signal than dry ones?
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 10:39:46 AM EDT
This is gonna devolve into a discussion about the pros and cons of red and blue frequency grease, isn't it?
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 10:41:01 AM EDT
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Quoted:


At least part of that signal is reaching you via reflection off something - buildings, trees, the ground, etc.

So - At those particular frequencies, do wet surfaces reflect more of the signal than dry ones?
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Quoted:
yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength


At least part of that signal is reaching you via reflection off something - buildings, trees, the ground, etc.

So - At those particular frequencies, do wet surfaces reflect more of the signal than dry ones?


They reflect less than dry ones
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 11:16:29 AM EDT
I love Arfcom.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 12:44:06 PM EDT
If you think the Bravo Sierra is bad here, go over to qrz.com .
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 12:49:34 PM EDT
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Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.
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I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 4:55:10 PM EDT
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I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.
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Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.


I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.


It's because of the seasonal dark periods, I hear in parts of kuwait they get 20 hours of darkness and temperatures down to -30
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:02:25 PM EDT
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They reflect less than dry ones
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Quoted:
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yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength


At least part of that signal is reaching you via reflection off something - buildings, trees, the ground, etc.

So - At those particular frequencies, do wet surfaces reflect more of the signal than dry ones?


They reflect less than dry ones


Wet materials have higher electrical conductivity than their dry counterparts.

Typically, materials with higher electrical conductivity are better RF reflectors.

Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:46:13 PM EDT
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Quoted:


It's because of the seasonal dark periods, I hear in parts of kuwait they get 20 hours of darkness and temperatures down to -30
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.


I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.


It's because of the seasonal dark periods, I hear in parts of kuwait they get 20 hours of darkness and temperatures down to -30


ROFL!
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 6:03:27 PM EDT
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Quoted:


Wet materials have higher electrical conductivity than their dry counterparts.

Typically, materials with higher electrical conductivity are better RF reflectors.

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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
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yet in that same rain, my wireless signal strength meter on my outdoor internet connection usually shows about 25% more signal strength


At least part of that signal is reaching you via reflection off something - buildings, trees, the ground, etc.

So - At those particular frequencies, do wet surfaces reflect more of the signal than dry ones?


They reflect less than dry ones


Wet materials have higher electrical conductivity than their dry counterparts.

Typically, materials with higher electrical conductivity are better RF reflectors.



Except at microwave frequencies water absorbs a great deal of RF energy and converts it to heat.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 6:21:48 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Except at microwave frequencies water absorbs a great deal of RF energy and converts it to heat.
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Back in the mid 1980's, when I was much younger and used K-band radar detectors, I swear they had much longer range when it was foggy out.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 6:47:34 PM EDT
Rain scatter propagation is a very real thing at microwave frequencies, especially at 5GHz and up. Raindrops become a significant fraction of a wavelength, and the signals essentially bounce from drop to drop.
Link Posted: 9/12/2013 6:08:17 AM EDT
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Rain scatter propagation is a very real thing at microwave frequencies, especially at 5GHz and up. Raindrops become a significant fraction of a wavelength, and the signals essentially bounce from drop to drop.
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I had read somewhere that a couple hams on the east coast were experimenting with thunderstorm bounce. Don't remember the freqs used however. Apparently they had a bit of success. How useful this method of propagation is up to question.
Link Posted: 9/12/2013 6:39:16 AM EDT
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I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.


I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.



Actually he told me that in Kuwait they have to keep their antennas and rotaters free of oil and lubricants because of a dust problem. He's a pretty sharp guy.
Link Posted: 9/12/2013 6:43:04 AM EDT
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Actually he told me that in Kuwait they have to keep their antennas and rotaters free of oil and lubricants because of a dust problem. He's a pretty sharp guy.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Laugh all you want, but a Kuwaiti told me that a coating of grease on an antenna in winter keeps the ice and snow from sticking to it. Betcha he's right.


I hear they have a lot of snow in Kuwait.



Actually he told me that in Kuwait they have to keep their antennas and rotaters free of oil and lubricants because of a dust problem. He's a pretty sharp guy.



I beleive it. People think sand is sand. It's more accurately described as tan baby powder. I still have that shit on all my gear from numerous trips over thataway...
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