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Posted: 5/4/2009 8:36:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/4/2009 8:42:28 AM EST by hmack]
I'm looking to get a Coleman 2 burner propane stove. Looks like there are two versions.

This
http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=5469-A00&categoryid=2010&brand=

and this
http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=5466AA00&categoryid=2010&brand=

Any good or bad experiences with either of these or other ones to look at?

Thanks,
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 8:58:13 AM EST
Id go with the slightly larger one...you can fit a bigger pan on it...and depending possibly get a flat griddle of the same size...
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 10:00:49 AM EST
One of my buddies has the second one. It's OK. We usually use a Grill/Stove combo unit, though. Something like this:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9922-A00&categoryid=2010

My buddy has one very similar to that one. I have an older version of the same thing, but IIRC, both of our grills are on the opposite side. (Probably changed because a right handed guy flipping burgers is hitting the pot all the time) They also make a Griddle for those Grill/Stove combos, it replaces the Grill plate, and has a oil drain on the perimeter so your grease

If I was going to go with a straight stove, I'd get a liquid-fuel one like this:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=425GA99&categoryid=2020&brand=

And then get the Propane adapter kit.
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 11:05:22 AM EST
I've been looking at the grill stove conbo too. Wife and I were going to go to Cabelas this weekend to get one. I figure that the grill would be a nice thing to have.
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 11:14:44 AM EST
Personally I have a two burner white gas stove. I have a family of 6, so the three burner powerhouse would vbe my choice if cooking for any more than four.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=428-A00&categoryid=2020

With garage sale season coming up, the two burner stoves are relatively easy to find used.
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 3:40:49 PM EST
Of the two choices, go with the 2nd one (Model No. 5466AA00). Our scout troop (I'm a scoutmaster) uses them and they've stood up well to several years of monthly abuse by teens. The other and more important reason is for the little bit of extra BTU's that it puts out, which is still quite anemic. However, I'd strongly recommend going with one of the duel fuel Powerhouse models (2 burner or 3 burner) instead. Each burner kicks out nearly twice the BTU's and I've never had a problem with them.

I also really like my single-burner Duel Fuel 533 for not so lightweight backpacking. The only complaint is the lack of pot holding surface area. I've had it for going on about 10 years now.
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 5:10:46 PM EST
Let me get this straight....your buying a Coleman stove and only considering propane???

This FTW

Coleman Powerhouse Dual Fuel Stove

Link Posted: 5/4/2009 5:51:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:
Let me get this straight....your buying a Coleman stove and only considering propane???

This FTW

Coleman Powerhouse Dual Fuel Stove
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5146YRMJQEL._SL500_AA280_.jpg


+1(00) on this.

Link Posted: 5/4/2009 6:32:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/4/2009 6:32:40 PM EST by Skopsko07734]

Originally Posted By MrHunterAZ:
Let me get this straight....your buying a Coleman stove and only considering propane???

This FTW

Coleman Powerhouse Dual Fuel Stove


+1!!!


Three days ago I bought one of these from Walmart for $65.00. While purchasing my Coleman stove I also bought the propane adapter, extension hose, and the large propane can adapter; these mods let me use 4 different types of fuel sources, Coleman Fuel, unleaded gas, the small Coleman propane cans, and the large BBQ type propane canisters.

Link Posted: 5/4/2009 6:43:42 PM EST
Thanks for the comments!

OK, set me straight.

The specs for the second one 5466AA00 say 22,000 BTU total for the two burners, so 11,000 each.

The Dual Fuel PowerHouse 2 burner says 24,500 BTU total for the two burners with one putting out 13,500 and the other 11,000.

I understand the dual fuel and conversion to propane make it three fuel which is good but the BTU output seems pretty similar with the price doubling.

So does the increase from 11K to 14.5K BTUs really make that much of a difference?
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 7:10:49 PM EST
Personally I have never bothered with the propane conversion for my liquid fuel stoves, I have intended to buy it but haven't so far. The coleman fuel packs a lot of BTU's - takes quite a while to go through an $8 can of fuel. Without the conversion stuff the prices are pretty similar and to me the liquid fuel stove is the way to go - in SHTF you could cook for a long time siphoning gas from nearby cars. Hard to siphon propane unless you commandeer from your neighbors or have a large storage tank on the AO.
Link Posted: 5/4/2009 7:17:59 PM EST
Once you use propane for a while and then use gas you will understand why everyone prefers gas.

The fuel is cheaper, easier to store, and you don't have to deal with 1/2 empty propane canisters. Plus if you add dual fuel lanterns then you can have 1 fuel for all you appliances. Plus liquid fuel works much much better in cold weather than propane.
Link Posted: 5/5/2009 4:13:27 AM EST
As you can see opinions vary. I have used both and they both work fine.

My experience has been (and YMMV):

Propane is easy to store and to deal with, produces less smell, burns very clean and is an easy stove for my wife change out the canisters. I have a two burner with the insta-start.
Propane also has an indefinate shelf life. Propane is more expensive (around here about $2.50/lb - for the 1lb. canisters), however you can mitigate this by using an adapter for larger tanks and taking the tanks down and having them re-filled ( vs. exchaging them at Home Depot, gas stations, etc).
You can also get an adapter from Harbor Freight to allow you to refill the 1lb. canisters.

The dual fuel puts out more heat, and is cheaper to operate. Coleman fuel (around here) runs about $8.97/gal. Shelf life of the fuel is 5-7yrs.
Common sense dictates that you have to be careful filling the tank, watch for spilled fuel, etc.

From the Coleman website FAQ:
"An un-opened container of Coleman® Fuel stored in a dry area with no rapid extreme changes in temperature will remain viable for five to seven years. An opened container stored in the same area will remain viable for up to two years though will be at its best if used within a year.

Coleman® Propane Cylinders can be stored indefinitely in a dry area. The propane fuel inside the cylinder will not break down."

Even though they are dual fuel, I still only use Coleman fuel because I think it just runs cleaner than using gasoline.




Link Posted: 5/5/2009 5:15:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/5/2009 5:17:06 AM EST by TxRabbitBane]
Liquid fuel stoves are great. I've taken them lots of pretty remote places and they've always performed like champs.

I also have a non-grill version of the mini-propane stove, which I used for the first time a couple of weeks ago. Here's what I noticed:
1. one fuel canister lasted all weekend using both burners consistently.
That's 2 big breakfasts for 4 folks (bacon/sausage/eggs/etc), 2 big dinners (not boil-and-eat crap), and tons of toasted marshmallows for the kids (burn ban prevented open fires)

2. boil time was consistent with my liquid fuel stove... made both pasta and rice on the trip which is somewhat fuel-consuming, but both turned out great.

3. heat was consistent and burner lit well even in moderate wind (with windscreens up).

I have to say that I was a little nervous about using the mini-propane stove, but it was easy, worked like a champ, and cooked great. The fuel usage was not too shabby either (not knowing how well it would last, I took lots of fuel).

So if you're looking for a Mad Max scenario stove, multi-fuel is a great option. It also cooks well (I have to admit I've only used white gas in one). If you're camping with the kids, the propane stove works great as well (IMO damned convenient too... never a spill or priming problem).

ETA my propane stove is not "insta-start", for the record.
Link Posted: 5/5/2009 9:01:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By TxRabbitBane:

ETA my propane stove is not "insta-start", for the record.


IMHO, after a while, none of them are.
Link Posted: 5/5/2009 9:08:11 AM EST
Don't be afraid to buy used. I saw a 2 burner propane one at a garage sale for 10 bucks one day recently. Didn't buy it but I wish I had cause a couple days later I bought a propane coleman lantern.
Link Posted: 5/5/2009 9:46:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By JBFJ40:
Don't be afraid to buy used. I saw a 2 burner propane one at a garage sale for 10 bucks one day recently. Didn't buy it but I wish I had cause a couple days later I bought a propane coleman lantern.



+1 on this, too.

I have yet to buy an old coleman lantern or stove that I could not get working. I have bought a few really crappy looking units, but they cleaned up nice and with very few parts, they are all working.
Link Posted: 5/5/2009 4:42:27 PM EST
Thanks again for all the comments.

If I could find one of the Powerhouse 2 burners for $65 like Skopsko07734 that's what I would get but the normal price around here is $120.

I'm in no rush so will watch Craigslist and will see what comes up there.
Link Posted: 5/6/2009 8:56:22 AM EST
My experience has been the opposite of the others––-the white gas stoves are horrible in cold weather––-hard to light and get hot––––-while the propane starts right up and cooks right away––––I use a 20lb refillable cylinder and have adapters for both the stove and lanterns.

I'll never buy another white gas appliance.
Link Posted: 5/6/2009 12:52:58 PM EST
I have one of the liquid fuel stoves that's at least 20 years old and it works like a champ. Check out yard sales, you would be surprised at the camping equipment that's for sale cheap.
Link Posted: 5/6/2009 1:28:07 PM EST
man that's old school. my dad still has his and he bought his in the 70's
Link Posted: 5/7/2009 4:47:30 AM EST
I still use my Dad's white gas Coleman that he bought in the 50's, works great, but takes a little understanding to get them to run right. If you don't get good pressure in your fuel tank from pumping, or if your generator is not dispursing the fuel properly, they don't work right. You can find replacement parts. I picked up a used one recently for $2.00 at a garage sale, put a new fuel cap on it, and now it runs great, so I gave it to my youngest daughter so she can use it for camping with her young family.

If, after you get them lit up, you don't have a blue flame, you need more pressure, so back to pumping.
Link Posted: 5/7/2009 4:53:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By Omaha-BeenGlockin:
My experience has been the opposite of the others––-the white gas stoves are horrible in cold weather––-hard to light and get hot––––-while the propane starts right up and cooks right away––––I use a 20lb refillable cylinder and have adapters for both the stove and lanterns.

I'll never buy another white gas appliance.


It depends on how cold it is. At a certain point, Propane just won't flow anymore unless you heat it up. The only time I have that problem anymore (I did back in the midwest, years ago) is when I toss a propane canister in the cooler.
Link Posted: 5/10/2009 10:01:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By dphill:
I have one of the liquid fuel stoves that's at least 20 years old and it works like a champ. Check out yard sales, you would be surprised at the camping equipment that's for sale cheap.


Mine is from 1966 and has been through at least two floods. Last one, opened it, sprayed it off quickly with the power washer, put the tank on and lit it - with the 10 year old coleman fuel that was in it. The wash off was mud, and had nothing to do with operations.
Link Posted: 5/13/2009 5:16:36 PM EST
I used to have the second one but with the sparker that'd ignite it. There was a button you'd push and it'd spark.

This one.

I gave it to my GF when we broke up and now all I've got is one of those one burner deals that screws directly onto the propane tank. I'm considering getting a Camp Chef Weekender.

GL
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:57:04 AM EST
Where are you guys finding the propane conversions? I used to see them at the local Wal-Mart but they don't have them anymore.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:05:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 10:06:49 AM EST by pyro6988]
Originally Posted By wshbrngr:
As you can see opinions vary. I have used both and they both work fine.

My experience has been (and YMMV):

Propane is easy to store and to deal with, produces less smell, burns very clean and is an easy stove for my wife change out the canisters. I have a two burner with the insta-start.
Propane also has an indefinate shelf life. Propane is more expensive (around here about $2.50/lb - for the 1lb. canisters), however you can mitigate this by using an adapter for larger tanks and taking the tanks down and having them re-filled ( vs. exchaging them at Home Depot, gas stations, etc).
You can also get an adapter from Harbor Freight to allow you to refill the 1lb. canisters.

The dual fuel puts out more heat, and is cheaper to operate. Coleman fuel (around here) runs about $8.97/gal. Shelf life of the fuel is 5-7yrs.
Common sense dictates that you have to be careful filling the tank, watch for spilled fuel, etc.

From the Coleman website FAQ:
"An un-opened container of Coleman® Fuel stored in a dry area with no rapid extreme changes in temperature will remain viable for five to seven years. An opened container stored in the same area will remain viable for up to two years though will be at its best if used within a year.

Coleman® Propane Cylinders can be stored indefinitely in a dry area. The propane fuel inside the cylinder will not break down."

Even though they are dual fuel, I still only use Coleman fuel because I think it just runs cleaner than using gasoline.






A lot of people, myself included, think that the part in red is just BS.

I yet to her of anyone having problems with Coleman fuel going "bad" on them. I have a can that has been open for 5 years and works just the same as when it was knew. There are guys here that have used colmen fuel several decades old without issue.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 12:20:29 PM EST
I am looking at these two Colemans:

the Dual Fuel Powerhouse
with 13,500 and 11,000 BTU burners.

and Dual Fuel Stove
with 7,500 and 6,500 BTU burners.

Having never used a camp stove before, what will the practical difference be?

Thanks.

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 3:38:11 PM EST
Originally Posted By makattack:
Where are you guys finding the propane conversions? I used to see them at the local Wal-Mart but they don't have them anymore.


Adapters Made in USA
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 4:24:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By ricka01:
I am looking at these two Colemans:

the Dual Fuel Powerhouse
with 13,500 and 11,000 BTU burners.

and Dual Fuel Stove
with 7,500 and 6,500 BTU burners.

Having never used a camp stove before, what will the practical difference be?

Thanks.



Higher BTUs equals faster boiling or cooking. It can make a significant difference if you are using them in the cold or at altitude. Personally I have the Powerhouse and am in love with it.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:34:13 PM EST
I know my dad has been using a can of coleman fuel for almost 30 years. He still hasn't used that can up. He doesn't use his stuff much these days, but the fuel will last if it's stored in a good location.

I'm still kicking myself for not picking up the 2 dual fuel laterns I saw this past weekend for 10 bucks. By the time I got back to the guys table they were gone.

My wal mart still sells all the propane adapter parts, along with pump kits.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 11:50:05 PM EST
I have a Coleman stove that was made in 1957 that I still use. It even has a leather plunger on the pump that still works.
I might upgrade to a duel fuel model for hurricane season this year.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 4:33:54 PM EST
I have the first Coleman stove above from the OP's post. We used it alot following Hurricane Ike when out power was out for 2 weeks.

I grilled the meat on my gas grill, and my son did the rice or pasta on the Coleman. He also cooked ham and scrambled eggs on it and the like.

I am very happy with the model I have and would buy another one if I needed it. I did buy an extra propane tube that hooks the propane bottle to the stove. It would such if you somehow broke this key piece. I also have the 12 foot conversion hose so you can use a 20 lb. propane grill bottle if you like.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 7:32:24 AM EST
Anyway to convert an old Coleman stove to dual fuel? I'd like the option to run unleaded gas on my 1950's Coleman Stove, but don't want to mess anything up.

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 9:17:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By JimE2:
Anyway to convert an old Coleman stove to dual fuel? I'd like the option to run unleaded gas on my 1950's Coleman Stove, but don't want to mess anything up.


I'd just pick up a new one from Walmart for under $90.
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