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Posted: 10/2/2011 3:21:48 PM EST
Hello all,
I was looking to pick up a alternative lantern to our battery powered or propane fueled ones. I was looking on amazon.com and they have a few different types of kerosine lanterns, but none look really that great. I just noticed that Coleman makes one, but I only ask about that one because I recognized the Coleman name. I am open to suggestions on possible other kerosine lanterns.I also saw a dual fuel model made by Colman. I have their dual fuel stove which runs on Coleman fuel. How is this product?

Thanks
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 4:03:25 PM EST
The dual fuel lanterns work great and since you have the stove already I would go with one or more of the lanterns. They give off a good amount of light and run for a pretty long time on a tank full of fuel.
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 5:19:30 PM EST
Indoor use = Kerosene (the wonder fuel)

Outdoor use = Coleman fuel/gasoline because it smells like a sack of buttholes when burning.
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 5:28:07 PM EST
Don't you have to replace the wick sack deal every time you light one? Is there a way to use it if you don't have a replacement wick?


look into petromax lanterns.
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 5:42:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By JohnWillis:
Don't you have to replace the wick sack deal every time you light one? Is there a way to use it if you don't have a replacement wick?


look into petromax lanterns.



No, I've had the sameone in my lantern for several years with no issues. I did have problems with a propane lantern that kept blowing out the mantle every time I lit it.
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 5:53:31 PM EST

I'd go duel-fuel. It will put out a lot more light than a non-pressurized kero lamp.
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 6:13:18 PM EST
Get both.

Kero for ambient light, gas for work light.

A oil lantern uses very little fuel, especially turned down, runs all night w/ no pumping, and won't bust a mantle if ya knock it around.

When there's detailed work to be done, gas is the answer.

Pick up a cheap oil lantern, and the Coleman dual fuel.
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 6:17:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2011 5:06:01 AM EST by DavidLewis]
The Coleman Kerosene lantern is their brightest lantern. It is a single-mantle pressurized lantern, very similar in design to
the usual "Coleman lantern", and uses mantles, not wicks. It's not like a Dietz lantern, or a kerosene lamp.

ETA: Link to Coleman Kerosene lantern

I have both types of Coleman lanterns (and a Dietz kerosene, too), and use both regularly (the Dietz only rarely), but the Coleman
Kerosene is by far brighter––it's at least as bright as two 2-mantle regular lanterns. The operation is slightly different, in that the
kero requires priming via alcohol in a priming cup surrounding the generator, which pre-heats it prior to ignition. It has the typical
Coleman pump to pressurize the tank.

Kerosene is cheaper than Coleman fuel/white gas, but getting a little harder to find (not as many gas stations still have kerosene
pumps).

The Petromax is supposedly brighter than even the Coleman Kero, but I don't have any direct experience with it. It's also about
3 times the price.

David
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 7:01:50 PM EST
Just an observation,

Most folks don't know how or won't learn how to store gas for a long time to burn in a lantern, etc.

If they use Coleman fuel that stores indefinately, ultimately the cost of storing enough for a long time becomes prohibitive, and dangerous, depending...

Kerosene/Jet A stores indefinately if done properly and is relatively the cheapest and most compact per BTU fuel that can easily be obtained and stored, that can be burned in complex devices.

So tho I don't have one, a Coleman kerosene lamp makes the most sense to me for a protracted time without electricity.

[Maybe I need to start looking on ebay]



Link Posted: 10/3/2011 4:42:19 AM EST
The best indoor fuel lights are Aladdin lamps. If you run good lamp oil in them, there is no smell at all, they throw a good amount of heat (handy in the winter) and are as bright as a 60watt incandescent light bulb. They are a bit pricey but worth it.

Also, definitely get a Coleman fuel lantern or two or three. Between craigslist and thrift stores you can score one for $5-$15. I truly enjoy them and they work like a champ. I can't say I've really ever used one indoors, but I don't see why you couldn't.
Link Posted: 10/3/2011 4:56:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2011 4:59:53 AM EST by DavidLewis]
Originally Posted By OpusXKC:
The best indoor fuel lights are Aladdin lamps. If you run good lamp oil in them, there is no smell at all, they throw a good amount of heat (handy in the winter) and are as bright as a 60watt incandescent light bulb. They are a bit pricey but worth it.

Aladdin lamps are great, but comparing them to Coleman lanterns is an apples to oranges comparison. Designed & built for different purposes, and each excels at their
designed purpose.

Also, definitely get a Coleman fuel lantern or two or three. Between craigslist and thrift stores you can score one for $5-$15. I truly enjoy them and they work like a champ. I can't say I've really ever used one indoors, but I don't see why you couldn't.


Carbon monoxide (CO), that's why.

David

Link Posted: 10/3/2011 7:44:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2011 7:46:35 PM EST by uncool]
I havent got one.......yet........but somthing to think about

Brite Lyt
Link Posted: 10/3/2011 7:54:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By DavidLewis:
Originally Posted By OpusXKC:
The best indoor fuel lights are Aladdin lamps. If you run good lamp oil in them, there is no smell at all, they throw a good amount of heat (handy in the winter) and are as bright as a 60watt incandescent light bulb. They are a bit pricey but worth it.

Aladdin lamps are great, but comparing them to Coleman lanterns is an apples to oranges comparison. Designed & built for different purposes, and each excels at their
designed purpose.

Also, definitely get a Coleman fuel lantern or two or three. Between craigslist and thrift stores you can score one for $5-$15. I truly enjoy them and they work like a champ. I can't say I've really ever used one indoors, but I don't see why you couldn't.


Carbon monoxide (CO), that's why.

David



+1 outdoor use only.......If Im gonna be on the news I want it to be for somthing involving a Stripper , not Carbon monoxide poisoning
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