Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 2/11/2012 11:40:19 AM EDT
This is a cargo-pocket sized kit I carry in my 24/7/365 woodsbumming pack. I have two kits, one to practice with and one to carry. It used to be carried in a hard side Pelican case but it became too bulky. In this manner, I can carry it more comfortably in a cargo pocket and it will flex and give a little. This kit compliments my usual gear and it isn't a stand alone kit. However, when I hit camp and begin to walk around, I don't wander far without it. The items in this kit are certainly better than not having any at all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Nr2IB4RO890

While I don't believe in a kit for every situation/emergency, some items are easier carried than made in the wild. With this set up, I can make shelter, build a fire, collect water and signal for help. The items have been tested time and time again and the kit is a work in progress.

Hope this video sheds some light on the items you may wish to carry. Feel free to ask questions and I'll gladly respond.

Kev

Link Posted: 2/11/2012 6:58:08 PM EDT
good little video and good little kit!
Link Posted: 2/12/2012 2:33:31 AM EDT
Great video review Kevin...it's always good to share ideas, re-evaluate your kit and inventory it periodically,

ROCK6
Link Posted: 2/12/2012 5:50:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/12/2012 5:53:26 AM EDT by ilbob]
Not really to do with this video or the person selling his educational services in this particular video.

Having seen a bunch of videos from supposed educators in the survival field, I often wonder what qualifies them to educate others, especially given the goofy advice they sometimes give. I know some of the goofiness (like carrying tampons or condoms) is as much marketing as anything practical, so I don't worry too much about that.

But the idea that one can use a few feet of wire as a snare to catch food by someone who has never done it is ludicrous. Having talked to a few people who have actually snared food, I have come to the conclusion that you would be lucky to catch one critter in 20 snares in a day. And the little survival fishing kit - just try catching some fish with it. It is possible, but people who actually have real fishing gear often catch nothing. I also get that the snares and fishing kit even though not all that practical are sort of traditional more than useful. In any case, the components don't take up much room and may well be useful for other things.

Really, food gathering is such a low priority in any short term survival situation that I wonder why people who should know better still even bother to mention it.

Link Posted: 2/12/2012 6:39:42 AM EDT
Ilbob,

I agree with you in some respects. Food is low on the priority list. This is why I begin with a poncho and space blanket, build up a fire kit, water kit and have a means for signaling. If most emergencies are resolved in 72 hours, this begins to cover your needs for an emergency bivouac.

As for trapping, the general ratio of traps to payoff is 6 to 1. That being said, we get a lot of students at the Wilderness Learning Center (the school I also teach for) who want to learn to make traps without spending time learning how to identify habitat and learn proper placement. Placement is 90% of the game. As for the length of wire carried, I teach students to use it sparingly and tie it off with paracord on spring or counterweight snares to "stretch" it further.

As for fishing, I disagree with the comments made about the ease or difficulty in catching fish. You can't see them in my video but I always include size 20 dry fly hooks. These are used to catch small bait fish. Here are some photos from an advanced survival course I taught back in 2010.







My students were camped along the Chateaugay River, a large fast moving body of water. While most would prefer a spinning rod to cast into deeper pools or further into the river, our guys found a small inlet where they could catch smaller fish more regularly. Considering the rapid population growth of sunfish in ponds, prevalence of water features where we train and the success we have in teaching these methods, I believe a small fishing kit is an excellent way to produce food and, if nothing else, pass the time while waiting for rescue or assistance.

By the way, I'm with you 100% on "supposed educators" in the survival field. There are many people who have come and gone since I first started teaching with the WLC in 2007. Even more since the school opened over 25 years ago. I began my small company to keep my side business of magazine article writing, product testing and course/clinic instruction legitimate and legal. A lot of hacks give us a bad name. As for my credentials, I came on the scene slowly and developed a good reputation by proving my ability and by putting in dirt time with others in the field at various wilderness events. It is funny how some of the guys who are out there as instructors never get out or even post when they are going out. Some are more in it for the money than they are for the love of the outdoors. In fact, a couple have contacted me to say I shouldn't give information away for free. To them, I tell them where they can shove their advice. In any case and in short, I hear ya!
Link Posted: 2/12/2012 6:42:28 AM EDT
Rock6,

Thanks brother! When you get a chance, can you post up your M6 or papoose rifle kit? I know you're using a zippered pouch and you have some useful gear on the outside. I think others including myself would benefit from your user input considering your background and time behind the trigger. What do you carry in it?
Link Posted: 2/12/2012 7:37:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/12/2012 7:48:26 AM EDT by MP0117]
Made hot.

Really good kit.

I'd like to see some practical applications for the glue stick. Sounds like a great idea!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Nr2IB4RO890
Link Posted: 2/12/2012 7:52:16 AM EDT
I was not picking on you in particular. I don't have any means by which to judge your skill level or the suitability of the instruction you provide.

I am inclined to think that fishing or snaring as a means of passing the time while waiting things out (as your later psost suggested) might be as good a reason to have such things in this kind of kit as any.

Personally, I have enough calorie reserves stored around my middle to last a few days. Or a few months. :)

I am mostly worried about three things. Weather, darkness, and getting lost.

Having been caught out in the rain a few times, I do not relish getting soaked again so I always bring some kind of poncho with me.

I ended up using the backlight of my cell phone to get back one time when I stayed out too late, so some kind of light goes with me.

A compass and map complete the things I feel are absolutely necessary. There are no places I can go real near where I live where there is much chance of me getting lost real bad. I have been turned around a few times, but never lost.

The stuff I carry with me when I go out hiking in the woods is not a lot different than your kit, sans the fishing and snaring stuff.

I carry a couple of 1 liter bottles of water, so don't see much need for water disinfection means. I suspect if I was farther away from civilization, I would rethink that.
Link Posted: 2/12/2012 9:06:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/12/2012 9:11:16 PM EDT by ROCK6]
Originally Posted By ilbob:
Not really to do with this video or the person selling his educational services in this particular video.

Having seen a bunch of videos from supposed educators in the survival field, I often wonder what qualifies them to educate others, especially given the goofy advice they sometimes give. I know some of the goofiness (like carrying tampons or condoms) is as much marketing as anything practical, so I don't worry too much about that.

But the idea that one can use a few feet of wire as a snare to catch food by someone who has never done it is ludicrous. Having talked to a few people who have actually snared food, I have come to the conclusion that you would be lucky to catch one critter in 20 snares in a day. And the little survival fishing kit - just try catching some fish with it. It is possible, but people who actually have real fishing gear often catch nothing. I also get that the snares and fishing kit even though not all that practical are sort of traditional more than useful. In any case, the components don't take up much room and may well be useful for other things.

Really, food gathering is such a low priority in any short term survival situation that I wonder why people who should know better still even bother to mention it.


That’s a good question on “instructor qualifications”. I know some who were certified Army SERE instructors or have other similar qualifications. However, I wouldn’t discount some of the “lay” instructors. Kevin is a great example of one who’s always been an outdoorsman and continued to improve his skills and is now a “certified” instructor at the WLC; good schools don’t allow just anybody to instruct. I do agree though, when talking about the art of snaring, fishing and even hunting. Knowing how to read the game activity in an area is much more important; same with fishing, you need to know how to read the source, underwater structure, feeding and hiding spots. I don’t care how much instruction you get, this is best learned through practice, practice, practice. Fishing is a great example. I can get skunked fishing for bass in my little lake, but know exactly where to snag a dozen or so smaller pan fish with a simple hand line:






Every day hike we go on near water sources, I’ll pack along our little fishing kit…it is great practice and my son enjoys it. Here was a great little swimming/fishing hole we hiked to in Central Texas…we fished before we swam



Your points are valid though. I suck at making expedient snares or at least maybe it’s a mental thing, but I have much better success with regular snares. The biggest challenge is to read which game trails are more active and identifying which burrows are vacant or potentially occupied.

Originally Posted By K_Estela:
Rock6,

Thanks brother! When you get a chance, can you post up your M6 or papoose rifle kit? I know you're using a zippered pouch and you have some useful gear on the outside. I think others including myself would benefit from your user input considering your background and time behind the trigger. What do you carry in it?


I’ll have to dig them up and see if I have any photos on my personal computer since I’m vacationing here in Afghanistan. The Papoose has the stock pouch with a better kit, but my Scout is mainly set up just for on-board ammo. I’m not the greatest hunter, but with enough patience and practice, you can put meat on the table. I prefer trot lines, fish snares and small game snares…active hunting can be time consuming and not always productive depending on your area. I popped this 50 pound beaver in the head from about 10 feet with my M6 Scout, the .22LR put him in his death-throws, but the little .410 buckshot stilled him:





Originally Posted By MP0117:
I'd like to see some practical applications for the glue stick. Sounds like a great idea!



I’ve found them to work on tarps…you just need a bead to fill in smaller holes for repairing. Sealing up and waterproofing a crack on your GPS; used with a little duct/100mph tape, it can be used to seal up a tear or crack on your kayak/raft. Although it didn’t last, it was a good temporary fix for the sole of my daughter’s shoe when hiking. I haven’t tried, but heard somebody fixed a hydration bladder with a glue stick. My wife said you could use it to glue a temporary patch of material to fix a large tear in clothing. If you understand this isn’t JB Weld, you’re only limited by your imagination.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 2/14/2012 5:25:11 AM EDT
Question- why not a 55 gallon drum liner instead of a poncho. They are heavier duty and can serve as a poncho as well as other applications.

I also include a 400 calorie "millenium" food bar in my kits. It has a five year shelf life and can withstand high temps. Granted, 400 calories is not much, but the caloric content of a couple of bream or a rabbit isn't much either. And I don't have to expend any energy to catch it.

Any thoughts?
Link Posted: 2/14/2012 7:59:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By cfcw:
Question- why not a 55 gallon drum liner instead of a poncho. They are heavier duty and can serve as a poncho as well as other applications.

I also include a 400 calorie "millenium" food bar in my kits. It has a five year shelf life and can withstand high temps. Granted, 400 calories is not much, but the caloric content of a couple of bream or a rabbit isn't much either. And I don't have to expend any energy to catch it.

Any thoughts?


Can't speak for Kevin, but if a drum liner would fold down compact enough, that would work. I remember somebody snagging several of those bright orange bags used by the road crews to clean up trash. Those were pretty sweet for both shelter, signalling and using to obtain water. I keep a Clif bar in most of my kits; they last a decent time and aren't too affected by extreme temperatures.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 2/14/2012 12:07:05 PM EDT
Great video! I subscribed. Don't agree with everything in it but that's why it is yours and not mine. I think I am going to throw one together.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 5:34:04 AM EDT
To address the "survival expert" issue...
Part of the problem is the "expert" mentality that is drilled into people in modern america. If you have a medical problem, you go to the doctor and do whatever he tells you no matter how stupid it may sound to you, because HE is an expert. If your car is making a funny sound, you take it to the mechanic and pay him whatever he says he needs to fix it because HE is an expert. etc.
I am not saying we should discount the advice of experts, BUT we should ALWAYS think through what they say and evaluate it. Two doctors may disagree completely on what is causing symptoms. Same goes for the mechanics. It is our job to listen to what they have to say, apply common sense and logic, maybe even (gasp) do some research ourselves, and then make an informed decision.
Once you get past the idea of accepting everything someone with a "expert" title says without applying some logic and common sense, you don't have to worry about "fake experts." You will figure out what they are pretty quickly.

Link Posted: 2/17/2012 7:53:25 AM EDT
Very cool video, tagging this one for other info
Top Top