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Posted: 8/6/2007 1:22:31 PM EDT
Sometimes I think there is too much stress put on the BoB and going on foot.

My first choice is my car fitted with all the useful gear I can carry.

I also have a bike rack and a bike, along with child carrying trailer for the bike. If forced to ditch the car, I would put my bag/gear in the child trailer and either pedal or walk alongside the bike.

Finally, if there were a mechanical or tactical reason to ditch the bike, I'd select a proper loadout from my equipment and only then head out on foot and with only the backpack.

Another variation for country people might be truck/van -> horse, donkey or mule (in horse trailer) -> foot

I guess you could use a motorcycle, too, but really the main point of the second line transportation is that it does NOT require gasoline or diesel.
Link Posted: 8/6/2007 1:25:58 PM EDT
Plan for worst case scenerio, so ppl talking about BOB is what they are thinking, if worst case doesnt happen than everything else is a given (cars, trucks , bikes) its pretty easy to plan when you have transportation, a lil diff. when you dont. I dont think there is enuff put emphasis on BOBs, mainly the carry what you brung, meaning, alot of ppl on here have no idea how far they can carry their BOB and just as many have no idea about the gear they put inside it. You have to use the gear and hump the pack to know what works and what doesnt.
Link Posted: 8/6/2007 5:46:09 PM EDT
Honestly, I think a lot of people think that when TSHTF, they are just gonna head to the woods with their BoB and play Rambo. Welll planned wilderness pioneering might work if all the land wasn't already spoken for! But this isn't the 1860s anymore. If you want land now, you gotta own it, buy it, or, if things get really bad, fight for it!

The only feasable way to survive in my opinion is having a place to retreat to...either yours, or somewhere that you are welcome to go.

Link Posted: 12/4/2007 3:38:33 PM EDT
btt for the n00bs
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 4:44:32 PM EDT
Friend of mine started a job at the Trade center on Monday, felt the building shake when hit on Tuesday.

He had parked his car below - and had to walk home - something like 30 miles on foot.

He made it safe and sound.

Now most of us would prefer a car to a bike and a bike to walking, but sometimes you can't find anything but your feet and open ground.

I've no longer romantic ideas of being able to hoof 2 dozen miles on foot lugging 40lbs. of my GHB. But it might be that lugging it 1 dozen miles will 'be enough to get out of Dodge'.

If you have a GHB and spare set of good shoes (that's currently an 'oversight' in my set up), then it won't matter if your car broke down and there's no bike in sight. You'll have what's needed to survive at least 1 night outside in any weather and up to 3-4 days in a sheltered semi-civilized place.

Transport then is my 'second thought' not first. First thought is having the stuff I need to survive first.

After all, it could be a nuke or chemical spill that goes off and forces you to hunker in place. Having all your eggs in a tactical bug out Jeep isn't going to help much when you're in the office under the table.

Or banking on the mountain bike to get you home lean and mean when the blizzard dumps on your position and again forces you to stay put.

Link Posted: 12/4/2007 4:51:48 PM EDT
Sometimes I think there is too much stress put on the BoB and going on foot.

My first choice is my car fitted with all the useful gear I can carry.


I also have a bike rack and a bike, along with child carrying trailer for the bike. If forced to ditch the car, I would put my bag/gear in the child trailer and either pedal or walk alongside the bike.

Finally, if there were a mechanical or tactical reason to ditch the bike, I'd select a proper loadout from my equipment and only then head out on foot and with only the backpack.

Another variation for country people might be truck/van -> horse, donkey or mule (in horse trailer) -> foot

I guess you could use a motorcycle, too, but really the main point of the second line transportation is that it does NOT require gasoline or diesel.


I have somewhat the same mind set, except if I have to BO it will be a 300 mile journey so I have extra fuel and know all the back roads. I also have a truck cap and trailer so I can move all my provisions or the majority of them. If something happens and I have to abandon the truck the it will be bikes and what we can carry on them.
For the most part I will be BI .
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:25:57 PM EDT
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Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:11:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By acman145acp:
<---------------


+4
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:33:14 PM EDT

<---------------
a new one on me what is it?
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:38:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rusteerooster:

<---------------
a new one on me what is it?


He's pointing at his avatar(<---- is an arrow), its a Quad.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:46:33 PM EDT
Ok thanks.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:51:10 PM EDT
Riding a bike with a ruck on is a bitch, especially up a hill with any slope to it. Same goes if you are riding into the wind. On a level or down graded surface, bikes are awsome. If you condition yourself for it, a bike can be a nice tool for covering distance- but you really do need to make sure your body is up to it. Otherwise, your upper leg muscles, ass, and lower back are going to hate you. Your also going to have to learn when it's best to dismount and carry/ push the bike. Remember those hills I mentioned- even when your conditioned reasonably well, there's times when pushing up them is better (more comfortable)- especailly after you've covered a bit of distance. Mud and loose wet dirt- Another one of those things your not going to want to ride through (though it can be fun if you manage to do it successfully).

OP is in North Dakota- you guys get SNOW up there. Have you ever ridden your bike in the snow? How about icey conditions? How about slush? I have, and I really don't recommend it- you spill very easily. Packed snow/ ice- you loose traction--really fast. Bike seems to just slide out from under you (when you keep it from spilling it is an awsome, gut wrenching feeling). You can forget about your breaks working. They WILL get jammed up with snow. Also, avoid any snow deep enough to interfere with your pedals or sproket or rear derailur.

These are factors that need to be taken into consideration- factors that I have expereience with. (biking in the rain- that sucks too---> but it's not as bad, except braking). It's one of those skills that you do actually have to practice- know what to do when, and actually have the PHYSICAL ABILITY to do it. I'm not going to guess on the kiddie carier- I've never towed one.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:53:50 PM EDT
And don't even get me started about the awful feeling in your leg muscles when you ride when it is just plain near 0 and windy. That's a feeling you really don't want to experience- it eats up your leg muscles real quick- and you feel an awful mix of buning and chills in those muscles. BTDT. You loose will to ride real quick then.
Link Posted: 12/5/2007 2:32:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/5/2007 2:39:15 AM EDT by aaron_fsp]
Having used a bicycle with a heavy pack, I'd take the bicycle
over hoofing it as long as the route was reasonably passable.
When fuel is in short supply, its bicycles, animals, or your
hooves.

Link Posted: 12/5/2007 11:37:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/5/2007 11:38:11 AM EDT by fewlio]
Some interesting replies. I've actually just discovered a workable winter concept, which is cross country skiing, or even better, skijoring, which is basically cross country sking with a belt around your waist and a bungee cord, hooked up to a dog on a harness. Ok obviously the dog needs to be winterized, decent sized and you'd have to spend some time training him. But he will pull you along nicely, and you are helping, too, so it's not all on the dog. Obviously people use dog sleds but most of us don't want to keep a team of dogs, this is a smaller and more workable version of that for many of us.

I definitely recommend a bike trailer for putting your gear in...a heavy pack is murder on your back and will through off your balance, much more manageable if it is being pulled on a rolling trailer.
Link Posted: 12/5/2007 11:42:53 AM EDT
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