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Posted: 8/3/2017 9:52:42 PM EDT
Can you tell if your stored salt is iodized by putting some on a potatoe and seeing if it turns slightly purple???
Link Posted: 8/3/2017 10:05:37 PM EDT
[#1]
No. The amount of iodine in table salt is tiny.

ETA:  Federal survey data shows that most Americans have an adequate iodine level. If you are concerned, fish  and shellfish, dairy products, bread and other grain products, and eggs supply iodine as well.
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 9:46:30 AM EDT
[#2]
it should work, add a few drops of vinegar to the salt solution.
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 12:57:51 PM EDT
[#3]
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 2:51:16 PM EDT
[#4]
"Test for Iodide in Table Salt" >>> (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jVV0o5sl1g)
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 3:21:02 PM EDT
[#5]
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Quoted:
"Test for Iodide in Table Salt" >>> (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jVV0o5sl1g)
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Thank you!

Dioxane reagent is available on eBay for $30...  Too much for what I want to do...


We bought a flat of salt shakers from one of the box stores and I'd like to know if the salt is iodized...

Is there an alternative way?




From Wiki for everyone interested---

Four inorganic compounds are used as iodide sources, depending on the producer: potassium iodate, potassium iodide, sodium iodate, and sodium iodide. Any of these compounds supplies the body with its iodine required for the biosynthesis of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormones by the thyroid gland. Animals also benefit from iodine supplements, and the hydrogen iodide derivative of ethylenediamine is the main supplement to livestock feed.[4]

Salt is an effective vehicle for distributing iodine to the public because it does not spoil and is consumed in more predictable amounts than most other commodities.[citation needed] For example, the concentration of iodine in salt has gradually increased in Switzerland: 3.75 mg/kg in 1952, 7.5 mg/kg in 1962, 15 mg/kg in 1980, 20 mg/kg in 1998, and 25 mg/kg in 2014.[5] These increases were found to improve iodine status in the general Swiss population.[6]

Salt that is iodised with iodide may slowly lose its iodine content by exposure to excess air over long periods.[7]

Production[edit]

Edible salt can be iodised by spraying it with a potassium iodate or potassium iodide solution. 57 grams of potassium iodate, costing about US$1.15 (in 2006), is required to iodise a ton of salt.[1] Dextrose is added as a stabilizer to prevent potassium iodide from oxidizing and evaporating. Anti-caking agents such as calcium silicate are commonly added to table salt to prevent clumping.
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 3:21:26 PM EDT
[#6]
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Quoted:
it should work, add a few drops of vinegar to the salt solution.
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I'll try this...



ETA-

Put some known iodized salt [pretty sure] and RO water in a cup to get a saturated solution...

Added some apple cider vinegar and put a thin slice of a potato into the mix.

Waiting to see if there's a color change.
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 6:11:54 PM EDT
[#7]
Just came back and there hasn't been a change.

Need to get a known sample of iodized salt and try it...

Also make a diluted solution of potassium iodate and try that...
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 6:38:02 PM EDT
[#8]
Try a few drops of bleach. You need elemental I2 for the color reaction.
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 6:50:20 PM EDT
[#9]
Taste it.

Seriously.

Put a tablespoon in a cup of water.  Compare with same of pickling salt.

It will be really obvious. Iodized will taste awful.
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 9:19:45 PM EDT
[#10]
Good ideas you 2...

I have to return to civilization in a couple days to get known iodized samples... Unless my SO can find some up here...
Link Posted: 8/4/2017 9:21:42 PM EDT
[#11]
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Quoted:
Try a few drops of bleach. You need elemental I2 for the color reaction.
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The extra chlorine will dissociate the sodium iodide or whatever they add to salt?
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 5:38:29 AM EDT
[#12]
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Quoted:


The extra chlorine will dissociate the sodium iodide or whatever they add to salt?
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It will oxidize the iodide to iodine, that will intercalate into the starch and produce the blue color (actually, in aqueous solution is it I3-, which is an iodine molecule combined with an iodide.)  It works much better if you can put a little bit of HCl into the bleach (forms chlorine in situ).  Any acid would help, but HCl is best.
If you had some hydrophobic organic solvent which would separate from water, you could make a solution of the salt, add some bleach, then shake it. The iodine would partition into the hydrophobic layer and turn it purple.
But I am sure there is not nearly enough iodine in the salt to produce a noticeable color.  The starch would be a much better bet.
Even so, like you say, you need a know iodized salt to use as a control.
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 10:29:20 AM EDT
[#13]
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Quoted:

It will oxidize the iodide to iodine, that will intercalate into the starch and produce the blue color (actually, in aqueous solution is it I3-, which is an iodine molecule combined with an iodide.)  It works much better if you can put a little bit of HCl into the bleach (forms chlorine in situ).  Any acid would help, but HCl is best.
If you had some hydrophobic organic solvent which would separate from water, you could make a solution of the salt, add some bleach, then shake it. The iodine would partition into the hydrophobic layer and turn it purple.
But I am sure there is not nearly enough iodine in the salt to produce a noticeable color.  The starch would be a much better bet.
Even so, like you say, you need a know iodized salt to use as a control.
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Looks like you answered his question. I'm curious if the iodide concentration in salt is high enough to get a positive starch reaction.
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 11:07:46 AM EDT
[#14]
Question OP. Are you hoping the the salt is, or isn't iodized. I use both here at home.
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 3:32:44 PM EDT
[#15]
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Quoted:
Question OP. Are you hoping the the salt is, or isn't iodized. I use both here at home.
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Salt is so inexpensive it doesn't matter.

It's mostly an intellectual exercise.


This morning as I was in the BR, I read in Henry Hubbard's old-timey string bound  phillysopical tombe, that I found in a thrift store years ago...

"A young person working in a shop or factory---

Who spends some time outdoors...

And an HOUR a day in intellectual exercise...

Will distinguish himself in life."

Paraphrasing...
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 5:53:10 PM EDT
[#16]
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Quoted:

We bought a flat of salt shakers from one of the box stores and I'd like to know if the salt is iodized...
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Not being a smartass, but what did the package say? If it didn't say iodized, I doubt it is.
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 7:30:01 PM EDT
[#17]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Salt is so inexpensive it doesn't matter.

It's mostly an intellectual exercise.


This morning as I was in the BR, I read in Henry Hubbard's old-timey string bound  phillysopical tombe, that I found in a thrift store years ago...

"A young person working in a shop or factory---

Who spends some time outdoors...

And an HOUR a day in intellectual exercise...

Will distinguish himself in life."

Paraphrasing...
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Question OP. Are you hoping the the salt is, or isn't iodized. I use both here at home.
Salt is so inexpensive it doesn't matter.

It's mostly an intellectual exercise.


This morning as I was in the BR, I read in Henry Hubbard's old-timey string bound  phillysopical tombe, that I found in a thrift store years ago...

"A young person working in a shop or factory---

Who spends some time outdoors...

And an HOUR a day in intellectual exercise...

Will distinguish himself in life."

Paraphrasing...
Oh, well in that case, carry on. And good luck
Link Posted: 8/5/2017 8:42:26 PM EDT
[#18]
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Quoted:


Not being a smartass, but what did the package say? If it didn't say iodized, I doubt it is.
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No marking...

Bulk flat of salt shakers... 24 IIRC.
Link Posted: 8/6/2017 12:24:40 PM EDT
[#19]
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Quoted:
If you are worried about clumping, I wouldn't.  Even Morton's is going to with time.  I'm pretty certain you have a hammer and a grinder.  

Back in the day, I can still remember all the salt my grandfather use to have and how in the fall, the time we put meat up in the smokehouse, the coffee would have a bitter taste to it from him using the coffee grinder on salt.  My grandmother use to give him  hell over it.  I found it quite amusing myself considering the dozens of ways my grandfather had to grind salt.  I think he used the coffee grinder just to get a rise out of my grandmother.  

Anyway to your question, the trick to that is making a solution.  You can accelerate it with a little hydrogen peroxide.  

Tj
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Odd. Many people put a little salt in their coffee when they brew it to stop some of the bitterness.
Link Posted: 8/8/2017 4:45:08 PM EDT
[#20]
Iodized salt can be used for preserving. Based on what I remember from my middle school Chemistry class, iodine will simply evaporate if salt is heated in the oven. I may be mistaken. It's been over 30 years since that Chemistry class. LOL.
It may be worth trying. Just put iodized salt in the oven for 30 minutes, at 400 degrees. Iodine should evaporate completely, unless it's chemically bonded somehow.
Link Posted: 8/9/2017 2:53:13 AM EDT
[#21]
damn you, arfcom!


a mixture of 1 tsp tapioca starch and 1 tsp iodized salt was prepared. mixture was disolved in 2 tblsp water, and mixed until no solid clumps remained. 4 drops 6% sodium hypoclorite was added to the mixture, and stirred.

self induced heating of the mixture was achieved by microwave radiation for 15 seconds. hydration of starch granules resulted in gel like clumps of solidified starch, but no coloration change.


so... on to the internet and
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-science-home-iodine-salt/

i havenn't tried it yet, so if someone does it, they can report here
Link Posted: 8/9/2017 7:49:41 PM EDT
[#22]
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Quoted:
Odd. Many people put a little salt in their coffee when they brew it to stop some of the bitterness.
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many theories on why this happens: TLDR: the salt molecule fits into the same hole as the bitterness on your tongue and blocks it increasing the sensation of sweetness.

Or its a mind game, either way it works
Link Posted: 8/9/2017 7:54:59 PM EDT
[#23]
I thought if it was a fine and consistent grain then it is iodized. Sea salt usually requires a grind shaker.
Link Posted: 8/9/2017 9:05:53 PM EDT
[#24]
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Quoted:
damn you, arfcom!


a mixture of 1 tsp tapioca starch and 1 tsp iodized salt was prepared. mixture was disolved in 2 tblsp water, and mixed until no solid clumps remained. 4 drops 6% sodium hypoclorite was added to the mixture, and stirred.

self induced heating of the mixture was achieved by microwave radiation for 15 seconds. hydration of starch granules resulted in gel like clumps of solidified starch, but no coloration change.


so... on to the internet and
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-science-home-iodine-salt/

I haven't tried it yet, so if someone does it, they can report here
View Quote
Thank you!  Interesting...

I'll likely do the experiment as soon as I can get some starch. In the mtns now...
Link Posted: 8/10/2017 7:37:15 AM EDT
[#25]
coloration change as a method of testing for iodization of salt

mix
4 oz water
1 tsp h2o2
1 tsp vinegar
1 tbl spoon test salt

add, and mix in
1/4 tsp corn starch

allow mixture to sit, though coloration change to a dull purple begins immediately for iodine containing salt, but no change occured for sea salt.

edit - modification of the experiment from scientific american
Link Posted: 8/10/2017 8:33:32 AM EDT
[#26]
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Quoted:
I thought if it was a fine and consistent grain then it is iodized. Sea salt usually requires a grind shaker.
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nope, canning salt is the same size as regular iodized salt.
Link Posted: 8/24/2017 1:40:32 AM EDT
[#27]
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Quoted:


nope, canning salt is the same as regular iodized salt.
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This is not correct.  Canning salt is non iodized and without caking additives.  It is just plain salt of a fine grind.  The anti caking additives can tend to turn the pickling liquid in home canned products like pickles cloudy.  Iodine can cause discoloration to the canned products.  Iodized salt can be used, however it is not ideal due to the product presentation issues.  Not a big issue for home canning, but it is a big issue for retail sales.
Link Posted: 8/24/2017 7:42:07 AM EDT
[#28]
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Quoted:


This is not correct.  .
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we were taking about the size, at least I was.

ie looks the same
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