Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/7/2012 6:01:29 AM EST
Looking at picking up a cast iron wood burning stove for when things "go dark"

Had the thought of also being able to use coal for fuel inside of it.

Does anyone see any negative side effects from using coal as a backup fuel source from time to time in one of these things?

Looking at the US Stove model 1261
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 6:17:48 AM EST
You want to make sure the stove is bi-fuel. Wood only stoves will not provide enough air for proper combustion of the coal.

Didn't research that stove, but make sure it is bi-fuel if you want to burn coal.

Also, best to start the fire on wood, then when you have good wood coal bed, shovel in your coal on top of that. This has given my uncle the best results.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 6:20:52 AM EST
Not sure on that model, however my old little Buck stove (insert) has the ability to burn coal. I haven't tried any though.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 6:21:43 AM EST
I'm not an expert, but from what I've read on here before, you are going to want to buy a coal burning stove if you want to burn coal. The coal is going to burn to hot for a stove designed for wood.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 6:26:00 AM EST
Coal Burns hotter than wood and typically the grate is different also.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 7:45:38 AM EST
Not to detour, but I found a stove much cheaper at Ace Hardware ($179) that looks extremely similar, it has a higher BTU rating.

Link Posted: 11/7/2012 7:58:07 AM EST
Back in the day before airtight stoves, it was common for people to toss a handful or two of coal atop the fire to give it a little extra staying power throughout the night.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 9:55:47 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rat_Patrol:
You want to make sure the stove is bi-fuel. Wood only stoves will not provide enough air for proper combustion of the coal.

Didn't research that stove, but make sure it is bi-fuel if you want to burn coal.

Also, best to start the fire on wood, then when you have good wood coal bed, shovel in your coal on top of that. This has given my uncle the best results.


that is good advice for hard coal but if you burn bit. coal start your kindling on the top, it will burn off the initial fumes and light better and cleaner
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 7:23:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/7/2012 7:24:05 PM EST by JohnnyScience]
Well at this time budget is the only thing holding back getting a bigger & better stove like the Buck stove Little John that is a true combo wood/coal stove. The US stove is only $200 and one hell of a bang for your buck @ $200!

I'm want the flattop style stove in order to be able to cook & heat things up.

I also want a primarily wood stove since wood is a pretty easy to obtain as a renewable resource by me. Coal on the other hand isn't, but could always have a few bags stored away just in case.

I was hoping to be able to throw a handful of coal in from time to time just as a booster. You really think that a cast iron stove that has a 96k BTU rating wont be able to do a little handful of coal? (the large big brother stove to the one we are talking about has a 106k BTU rating)

That cast iron stove from Ace Hardware looks exactly like the US Stove wood burner I was going to get, but $20 cheaper. I wonder how the quality is compared to US stoves though? I'm going to check out Ace here locally & see if they have any in stock to see.

Link Posted: 11/8/2012 3:19:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cargo:
Not to detour, but I found a stove much cheaper at Ace Hardware ($179) that looks extremely similar, it has a higher BTU rating.


you can get that same one (brand included) at HF for less
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 4:47:05 AM EST
Interesting, what's "HF"?
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 4:58:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By JohnnyScience:
Interesting, what's "HF"?


http://www.harborfreight.com/cast-iron-boxwood-heater-stove-32058.html

20
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 5:00:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By JohnnyScience:
Interesting, what's "HF"?


Harbor Freight.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 5:16:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By inop:

Originally Posted By Cargo:
Not to detour, but I found a stove much cheaper at Ace Hardware ($179) that looks extremely similar, it has a higher BTU rating.


you can get that same one (brand included) at HF for less

I see as $189 listed online at HF, are you using a code?
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 6:30:29 AM EST
Arfcom of coal heating:

http://nepacrossroads.com/

Personally, I wouldn't be too concerned about tossing a few chunks of coal into a woodstove from time to time, but I would NOT get a rippin coal fire going in there. You might melt it
Just keep in mind, a $200 stove is going to need the gaps sealed to make it efficient, also, you are going to spend a LOT more than $200 in stovepipe
Don't forget that your homeowner's insurance may stipulate that the install be done by a professional or you're ass out in case of a fire claim.

I'd get the cheapy stove, seal it, and see how it goes. If you really want to burn coal down the road, you can always upgrade to a better stove


Speed
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 7:56:19 AM EST
I had one of those shitty stoves. Super cheap, and wont hold a fire very long. You can seal it up, but it wont perform well. Those stoves are nothing more than a metal box with a door and a flue on it. A century or so ago when they were designed, there was only consideration on how much it would hold, and not so much on how well it burned. I got rid of mine pretty quick. Just saying, but if you are going to pay a couple hundred for a shitty chinese-made stove, you can easily pay $200 for a good used decent stove. I see Jotul 602s on CL all the time for $200 or less. You get what you pay for.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 10:55:49 AM EST



cut and paste didn't want to work right
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 12:21:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/8/2012 12:26:47 PM EST by JohnnyScience]
Wow! That's one he'll of a deal! Is that coupon for Harbor Freight? Do you have a link to the coupon so I can print it up?

It might not be the best, but for the price it's priceless if & when you need to use it in case of a power outage or emergency.

Do you guys think there's any quality differences between the US Stoves sold @ Lowes for $199, the Ace Hardware model for $179 & this harbor freight for $129?

I know the US stoves are made in china (go figure) and imagine they're all produced by the same factory just with a different name stamped in.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 2:36:38 PM EST
i wasgiven a few tons of soft coal. most are large chunks and i toss one in the wood stove all the time. it burns kinda dirty but they light real easy and burn hot. my stove though is a higher quaility than the hf one.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 4:31:31 PM EST
Make sure your chimney and stovepipe are coal rated. You can burn your house down quick if not.
Link Posted: 11/9/2012 1:20:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By JohnnyScience:
Wow! That's one he'll of a deal! Is that coupon for Harbor Freight? Do you have a link to the coupon so I can print it up?

It might not be the best, but for the price it's priceless if & when you need to use it in case of a power outage or emergency.

Do you guys think there's any quality differences between the US Stoves sold @ Lowes for $199, the Ace Hardware model for $179 & this harbor freight for $129?

I know the US stoves are made in china (go figure) and imagine they're all produced by the same factory just with a different name stamped in.

Thanks!

Ace sells the same brand as hf (for this stove)
as for coupons if you sigh up to get the emails they will send you lots of emails with coupons in them
And some emails without
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 6:11:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 6:12:28 PM EST by JohnnyScience]
So is there "special" kind of duct work to hook one of these cast iron wood burning stoves from HF up? A special high heat or something? The regular duct work home depot sells should be fine correct?

I know I just want a single layered duct to get the most heat off of it, compared to the double layered, more "finished" style duct work.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 1:09:04 AM EST
Anyone?
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 1:22:50 AM EST
in open space (between the stove and ceiling) I think you can use the black colored single wall

but in the attic it must be at least the triple wall stuff

outside wont matter much
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 1:52:25 PM EST
Is the black just for aesthetics? I assume you can use regular silver duct right?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 3:40:14 PM EST
I don't know but it may show temp rating
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 3:44:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By inop:
in open space (between the stove and ceiling) I think you can use the black colored single wall

but in the attic it must be at least the triple wall stuff

outside wont matter much


Outside matters a lot. Seriously, do a lot more research on chimneys before trying to cobble one together.

If you guys want to burn coal, install a coal rated stove. They usually have fire brick liners and different grates and air intake systems.

Chimneys are important, too. You will spend more for the chimney than the stove, if you do it right. I would not burn coal with triple wall chimney.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 1:53:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By motocyclista:
Originally Posted By inop:
in open space (between the stove and ceiling) I think you can use the black colored single wall

but in the attic it must be at least the triple wall stuff

outside wont matter much


Outside matters a lot. Seriously, do a lot more research on chimneys before trying to cobble one together.

If you guys want to burn coal, install a coal rated stove. They usually have fire brick liners and different grates and air intake systems.

Chimneys are important, too. You will spend more for the chimney than the stove, if you do it right. I would not burn coal with triple wall chimney.



Most triple wall chimneys are rated to 2100*F, which is enough to make steel glow orange. There is no higher rating, so it is safe for a coal stove. Wood stoves have a night and day different air flow than a coal stove, and it would be very difficult to to even get coal to burn in a wood stove. Be glad it is, b/c if yo get a coal fire going in a wood stove, you will very likely melt the stove and dump burning coal and blobs of melted steel all over the floor..

Coal is far and away much easier and more efficient than wood. Coal is, in most places, is the cheapest cost per BTU and much less work than wood to boot.

Ops

Top Top