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Posted: 1/26/2013 7:17:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2013 9:25:04 AM EDT by EXPY37]
Wondering if used and bad auto starting batteries have a value more than what they pay when you exchange?

There's some scrappers here, what are yards paying for them?

Does it make sense to save them for the future and maybe try to find more?


Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:22:09 PM EDT
Is the lead in them usable for casting bullets?
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:36:51 PM EDT
I buy them, regularly.
I pay 5 bucks for auto, and 20 for 8D batteries.
Palletize, and ship them out to smelter.
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:50:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2013 7:50:41 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By Fullpower:
I buy them, regularly.
I pay 5 bucks for auto, and 20 for 8D batteries.
Palletize, and ship them out to smelter.



What is the smelter paying?

How do you find a nearby smelter?

Link Posted: 1/28/2013 5:44:15 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Is the lead in them usable for casting bullets?


Well, yes and no. Batteries contain nasty stuff... in old batteries the plates are often sulfated and IIRC smelting the plates to get at the lead releases nasty crap into the air, much nastier than the lead itself. The details are above my knowledge level so I will stop there. I'm sure somebody will be along to further explain the details.
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 1:41:16 PM EDT
Anyone know what's being paid for battery scrap?

Link Posted: 1/28/2013 3:05:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2013 3:07:00 PM EDT by Blackoperations]
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Anyone know what's being paid for battery scrap?



on a local level, $5 bucks each for scrap, for a typical sized car battery...and they wont take anything but lead acid (dry or wet) no lithuam ION from your old drill

cores are $9 bucks at almost every retail store I go to. Here is a nice trick, wally world will literally take any lead acid battery in for credit (on the core charge)...initially I thought it was just a matter of ignorance on wallys employee part, but I questioned the automotive manager about this and he said it did not matter the size to size difference.

So guess what, I have a stash of batteries from UPS battery backup units and trade one small 7ah hour battery in for a nice 130 amp hour marine battery. On a related topic, why is it so hard to find marine batteries at wally world?

Kmart used to give $5 bucks store credit on all battery cores, if you were not buying a new one...just bring them your extras. But this was many many years ago, so I dont know if they still do.
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 3:12:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2013 3:13:41 PM EDT by Blackoperations]
market is currently high at .40 cents per pound.

scrap yards will give you on average 33% of market. so 12 cents per pound....some more some less.

scrapmonster.com is a good site.
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 3:54:56 PM EDT
Thanks.

I called the scrap yd and they pay 15 cents/#

Another trick might be to be sure the electrolyte level isn't too far down...


Link Posted: 3/15/2013 2:18:12 PM EDT
Current market price?
Link Posted: 3/15/2013 3:42:46 PM EDT
same as last week.
I PAY 5 bucks for AUTO batteries,
and 20 bucks for 8D's
. How many ya got?
Link Posted: 3/15/2013 4:07:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Fullpower:
same as last week.
I PAY 5 bucks for AUTO batteries,
and 20 bucks for 8D's
. How many ya got?



More importantly, what can you sell them for?



Do you think setting them aside for higher prices makes sense?

Any EPA issues?

Link Posted: 3/15/2013 6:07:59 PM EDT
Here's another answer, more in the SF mindset:

My GF bought a new battery because hers was a little light in the cranking amps, and we'd rather be safe than sorry on a winter day. Autozone offered her almost nothing for the trade, so I just paid her the trade value and kept the battery for myself. Hooked it up to the inverter and it seems to work just along the lines of what an auto battery should for such a load. Also takes a charge just fine.

Yeah, it is not a bank of deep cycle golf cart batteries, but it will run a few strips of LEDs in an emergency for FAR less than I could get the same battery capacity otherwise.

Just something to think about.
Link Posted: 3/15/2013 7:46:51 PM EDT
We need a mini-wiki on field-expedient lead-acid battery rebuilding...

Typically, the ultimate lifespan of an off-the-grid energy system is determined by how long its batteries last - They are the weak link in the long-term durability chain. Every other component either has a much longer life expectancy, or is field-repairable.
Link Posted: 3/15/2013 10:00:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/15/2013 10:18:30 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By Skibane:

We need a mini-wiki on field-expedient lead-acid battery rebuilding...

Typically, the ultimate lifespan of an off-the-grid energy system is determined by how long its batteries last - They are the weak link in the long-term durability chain. Every other component either has a much longer life expectancy, or is field-repairable.




Interesting you mention this.

I've acquired almost half a dozen 'books' from 30 page training pamphlets to advanced texts written just before the turn of the last century, primarily on the subject of secondary batteries.

It's impressive to re-discover what was understood then and that little has changed in 110 to 120 years.

Advances in material science has been one of the greatest factors of change. Battery chemistry is essentially the same.

Trollies were being run w/ batteries in the 1890's all over the world and city electrical plants depended on batteries many places to load balance and allow generating capacity to be reduced at non-peak times for greater economy. These systems were well understood and throughly engineered.

Just amazing what was understood in the late 1800's.



Link Posted: 3/15/2013 10:10:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/15/2013 10:23:55 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Folks who think technology will be significantly lost in their vision of SHTF have no idea. Tech may be slowed in their vision of long term disaster, but things we already understand will be capitalized on and great profits would be made.

The folks who think we will revert to a 'romantical' primitive life likely have little understanding/knowledge of tech in the first place.

[^^^ doesn't mean I expect a SHTF to destroy our technical infrastructure, I don't. I expect far bigger problems that will be ENABLED by ADVANCED tech. ]

Link Posted: 3/16/2013 6:41:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Skibane:
We need a mini-wiki on field-expedient lead-acid battery rebuilding...

Typically, the ultimate lifespan of an off-the-grid energy system is determined by how long its batteries last - They are the weak link in the long-term durability chain. Every other component either has a much longer life expectancy, or is field-repairable.

This is a fantastic idea

Some of you guys might remember when a few months ago I created a thread decrying the loss of two Optima yellow top batteries that a colleague had left outside in the weather. I was ready to eat that $400+ loss and buy two replacements when someone here advised me on how to resurrect them. It worked, and they are doing well.

Knowing how to do that might be common knowledge for some of you, but I sure as heck didn't know about it

Link Posted: 3/16/2013 6:44:57 AM EDT
Our local scrapyard paid me .28 cents a pound for batteries, was .30. I think the core charge at sams club is $15, I get most of my batteries from there.
Link Posted: 3/16/2013 6:46:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By Skibane:

We need a mini-wiki on field-expedient lead-acid battery rebuilding...

Typically, the ultimate lifespan of an off-the-grid energy system is determined by how long its batteries last - They are the weak link in the long-term durability chain. Every other component either has a much longer life expectancy, or is field-repairable.

Interesting you mention this.

I've acquired almost half a dozen 'books' from 30 page training pamphlets to advanced texts written just before the turn of the last century, primarily on the subject of secondary batteries.

It's impressive to re-discover what was understood then and that little has changed in 110 to 120 years.

<snip>


My Grandpa used to build car batteries in a dirt-floor auto shop in town in the 20's before the crash. Sadly my grandparents all passed while I was too young to learn much from them...
Link Posted: 3/16/2013 9:18:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2013 9:24:14 AM EDT by EXPY37]
Here is a wonderful resource on most aspects of auto storage batteries --written around 1922.

Look at the pix near the end, to see working condx in that era. [Enviroweenies, don't look]

Full instructions on repair are included, seems complex, but if you have a bunch of old batteries around to scrap for parts, can be done.

In those days, manufacturers had mostly rubber and a few other insulating materials. Now we have many acid resistant and readily available materials so batteries can be assembled to last much longer.


http://home1.gte.net/mikelob/Rebuilding%20Lead-Acid%20Batteries%201922-Witte.pdf

With this info, a competent and resourceful person could be expected to repair their own batteries. Not in an ideal manner, but sufficiently well that the battery would be servicable.



Link Posted: 3/16/2013 2:46:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2013 2:50:01 PM EDT by tc556guy]
Thanks for the PDF link. Add that one to the survival PDF thread, if you don't mind.

Originally Posted By EXPY37:

I've acquired almost half a dozen 'books' from 30 page training pamphlets to advanced texts written just before the turn of the last century, primarily on the subject of secondary batteries.

It's impressive to re-discover what was understood then and that little has changed in 110 to 120 years.

Advances in material science has been one of the greatest factors of change. Battery chemistry is essentially the same.

Trollies were being run w/ batteries in the 1890's all over the world and city electrical plants depended on batteries many places to load balance and allow generating capacity to be reduced at non-peak times for greater economy. These systems were well understood and throughly engineered.

Just amazing what was understood in the late 1800's.


Are these PDFs or hard copies you have?

If they are PDFs I would greatly appreciate getting copies to add to my survival files.

Backwoods Home Magazine did a few articles in the 90s about bringing old batteries back to life
Link Posted: 3/16/2013 7:58:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CJan_NH:
Originally Posted By Skibane:
We need a mini-wiki on field-expedient lead-acid battery rebuilding...

Typically, the ultimate lifespan of an off-the-grid energy system is determined by how long its batteries last - They are the weak link in the long-term durability chain. Every other component either has a much longer life expectancy, or is field-repairable.

This is a fantastic idea

Some of you guys might remember when a few months ago I created a thread decrying the loss of two Optima yellow top batteries that a colleague had left outside in the weather. I was ready to eat that $400+ loss and buy two replacements when someone here advised me on how to resurrect them. It worked, and they are doing well.

Knowing how to do that might be common knowledge for some of you, but I sure as heck didn't know about it



Please elaborate, I think I may have missed this part...
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 1:16:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2013 1:17:52 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By tc556guy:


[violet]Thanks for the PDF link. [violet]Add that one to the survival PDF thread, if you don't mind[/violet].[/violet]


Originally Posted By EXPY37:

I've acquired almost half a dozen 'books' from 30 page training pamphlets to advanced texts written just before the turn of the last century, primarily on the subject of secondary batteries.

It's impressive to re-discover what was understood then and that little has changed in 110 to 120 years.

Advances in material science has been one of the greatest factors of change. Battery chemistry is essentially the same.

Trollies were being run w/ batteries in the 1890's all over the world and city electrical plants depended on batteries many places to load balance and allow generating capacity to be reduced at non-peak times for greater economy. These systems were well understood and throughly engineered.

Just amazing what was understood in the late 1800's.


Are these PDFs or hard copies you have?

If they are PDFs I would greatly appreciate getting copies to add to my survival files.

Backwoods Home Magazine did a few articles in the 90s about bringing old batteries back to life




Will try and do tonight.

I have hard copies.

Link Posted: 3/18/2013 1:25:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Will try and do tonight.

I have hard copies.


No rush and thanks
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 11:46:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Will try and do tonight.

I have hard copies.


No rush and thanks


Well, I can't find where to post the PDF.

Directions please...



Link Posted: 3/19/2013 3:42:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By EXPY37:

Well, I can't find where to post the PDF.

Directions please...


Any of the file hosting entities would work. Do you have a Scribd account already, for instance?
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:42:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2013 12:54:35 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:

Well, I can't find where to post the PDF.

Directions please...


Any of the file hosting entities would work. Do you have a Scribd account already, for instance?



No... I admit, I can't even find where to put the PDF.

I'm lost...

But this isn't unheard of...





Link Posted: 3/19/2013 5:12:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EXPY37:

No... I admit, I can't even find where to put the PDF.

I'm lost...

But this isn't unheard of...





Open a scribd account, upload your docs there, post the link to your shelf here
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 5:44:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2013 5:45:49 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:

No... I admit, I can't even find where to put the PDF.

I'm lost...

But this isn't unheard of...





Open a scribd account, upload your docs there, post the link to your shelf here



Ain't gonna likely happen.

I suggest folks bookmark the link to the PDF above and save it as a file.

Besides I don't know where my shelf is here let alone where's my hat.

Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:45:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EXPY37:

Ain't gonna likely happen.

I suggest folks bookmark the link to the PDF above and save it as a file.

Besides I don't know where my shelf is here let alone where's my hat.



OK, well thanks for the offer to share your docs anyways. Maybe theres someone on the board you're familiar with who'd be willing to host your PDFs on their account
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:49:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2013 10:52:38 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By EXPY37:

Ain't gonna likely happen.

I suggest folks bookmark the link to the PDF above and save it as a file.

Besides I don't know where my shelf is here let alone where's my hat.



OK, well thanks for the offer to share your docs anyways. Maybe theres someone on the board you're familiar with who'd be willing to host your PDFs on their account



The PDF wasn't created by me. It isn't mine.

I found it on Google and is readable and savable by most anyone.

I thought some folks would like to read it, there's a valuable bit of info for tech types.

I don't know anyone who could host it, maybe you could since you are very familiar w/ the process?



Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:53:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EXPY37:


The PDF wasn't created by me. It isn't mine.

I found it on Google and is readable and savable by most anyone.

I thought some folks would like to read it, there's a valuable bit of info for tech types.

I don't know anyone who could host it, maybe you could since you are very familiar w/ the process?



I was referring to the other half dozen texts you mentioned having.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 11:45:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2013 11:46:58 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Got it now, --they are books...

The PDF here has the best of the practical info.
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