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Posted: 5/14/2013 1:24:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/14/2013 5:20:34 PM EST by XSabers]
Just added a new member of the family last Saturday. Got a 10 week old male. It seems like owning one of these is like joining a Fraternity. They have their own registration and certification tests and eschew the AKC all together. Aside from having the "new baby" syndrome right now, I'm looking forward to developing into an all around hunting team with this guy.



Link Posted: 5/14/2013 3:37:33 PM EST
Great dogs out of a great club. I was active years ago, but time has past. My "Tess" was the finest hunter I ever had to priviledge to walk behind. You're on the start of a great adventure. Very best of luck. Post some pic please.
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 3:20:00 PM EST
Great looking pup
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 3:50:30 PM EST
Interesting is your dog an import or did you buy it in the USA?
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 2:52:33 AM EST
Originally Posted By beardog30:
Interesting is your dog an import or did you buy it in the USA?


Bought him from a breeder in Chewela, WA. The guy is a phenominal breeder/trainer. I took my new one in for a "well puppy" appointment yesterday. The vet was so impressed that he asked for the breeder's info to pass on to his brother who's looking for a new hunting dog. Here's his web site Natohaus Kennel
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 4:43:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/16/2013 4:43:51 AM EST by beardog30]
Originally Posted By XSabers:
Originally Posted By beardog30:
Interesting is your dog an import or did you buy it in the USA?


Bought him from a breeder in Chewela, WA. The guy is a phenominal breeder/trainer. I took my new one in for a "well puppy" appointment yesterday. The vet was so impressed that he asked for the breeder's info to pass on to his brother who's looking for a new hunting dog. Here's his web site Natohaus Kennel


I have heard some very good things about the breed, but my only knowledge of them is from imports. The mainland European breeders have incredibly strict standards for their dogs in both breeding standards and who they will sell a dog to. My understanding is the mainland European breeders will only sell a pup to you if a person can prove they will hunt their animal on a regular basis.

I was thinking my next dog was either going to be a Britt or Wirehair, my two little German Shorthairs are phenomenal bird dogs, they just don't buck the sub zero temperatures well. I may have to look into the Deutsche Drahthaa.
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 12:16:46 PM EST
It's the same standard for DDs here in the US. I'm having to relearn German to go through Ahnentafel (pedigree) for my boy. The document is written in German and goes back (on the document itself) 4 generations, and I'm pretty sure it's registered with the German breed organization. Verein Deutsch-Drahthaar
Link Posted: 5/20/2013 8:30:54 PM EST
I'm a huge DD fan. Have a deposit on a Pudelpointer from Rock Creek Kennels in MN I'm waiting on. Had a hard time deciding between the two but my wife saw a PP(actually a pudelpointer/wirehaired pointing griffon mix) at Sportsmans and fell in love...and the decision was made. I'm happy with any "ugly dog."

Have fun! That dog will be a retrieving and pointing machine. Make sure to post pics of the progress. Awesome pup!!
Link Posted: 5/27/2013 5:01:37 AM EST
great breed, have been interested in one for some time, but I'm not interested in tracking furred game, just a versatile bird dog for duck, quail & dove, & it appears that they won't register pups if you don't train for furred game as well. Am I misunderstand this or is this your understanding too?
Link Posted: 5/27/2013 11:27:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By jdfworth:
great breed, have been interested in one for some time, but I'm not interested in tracking furred game, just a versatile bird dog for duck, quail & dove, & it appears that they won't register pups if you don't train for furred game as well. Am I misunderstand this or is this your understanding too?


I don't think that's correct. Mine is "registered" and he hasn't been through the first test yet. We got his German registration card in the mail this past week. My breeder told me that I don't have to take my dog through any or all of the testing. He'd like me to, but it's up to me how far I want to take him.

This is from the VDD-GNA: VDD-GNA testing programs

The testing program of Group North America adheres to all VDD and JGHV Test Regulations. To evaluate hunting ability, VDD/GNA sponsors Spring Natural Ability Tests (VJP), Fall Breed Tests (HZP), Fall Utility Tests (VGP), and Coat and Conformation evaluations (Breed Shows). For the purpose of breeding hunting dogs that are valued highly for versatility, the breed tests evaluate inherited ability, rather than establishing the superiority of one dog over another. To enter a dog in these tests, an owner must be a member of a JGHV affiliated club, such as VDD/GNA.

Testing of the dogs’ inherited natural ability begins with the Natural Ability Test (VJP) when the dog is approximately one year old and essentially untrained (i.e. the dog has not been trained to retrieve to hand, although it should have been exposed to furred and feathered game and demonstrated to the handler its ability to track furred game and search for and point feathered game). This “Puppy” Test is designed to evaluate the young Drahthaar’s inherited abilities in five different categories (pointing, nose, tracking, search, and cooperation).

Fall breed Tests (HZP) are conducted each fall for the Drahthaar whelped prior to October 1st of the previous year. The HZP for the retrieving trained dog, again allows evaluation of the five qualities listed above, and adds several demanding retrieving tasks. Desire, obedience, and trainability are also important aspects of the is evaluation.

The ultimate field test for the fully trained Drahthaar is the Utility Test (VGP). This test allows evaluation in 26 categories, and 18 different hunting situations. This test is a comprehensive evaluation of the dog’s performance. Obedience is emphasized in the VGP, however, natural ability also is evaluated. Handlers of the Deutsch-Drahthaar are encouraged to strive toward the successful completion of the VGP.
Link Posted: 5/27/2013 1:45:19 PM EST
Originally Posted By XSabers:
Originally Posted By jdfworth:
great breed, have been interested in one for some time, but I'm not interested in tracking furred game, just a versatile bird dog for duck, quail & dove, & it appears that they won't register pups if you don't train for furred game as well. Am I misunderstand this or is this your understanding too?


I don't think that's correct. Mine is "registered" and he hasn't been through the first test yet. We got his German registration card in the mail this past week. My breeder told me that I don't have to take my dog through any or all of the testing. He'd like me to, but it's up to me how far I want to take him.

This is from the VDD-GNA: VDD-GNA testing programs

The testing program of Group North America adheres to all VDD and JGHV Test Regulations. To evaluate hunting ability, VDD/GNA sponsors Spring Natural Ability Tests (VJP), Fall Breed Tests (HZP), Fall Utility Tests (VGP), and Coat and Conformation evaluations (Breed Shows). For the purpose of breeding hunting dogs that are valued highly for versatility, the breed tests evaluate inherited ability, rather than establishing the superiority of one dog over another. To enter a dog in these tests, an owner must be a member of a JGHV affiliated club, such as VDD/GNA.

Testing of the dogs’ inherited natural ability begins with the Natural Ability Test (VJP) when the dog is approximately one year old and essentially untrained (i.e. the dog has not been trained to retrieve to hand, although it should have been exposed to furred and feathered game and demonstrated to the handler its ability to track furred game and search for and point feathered game). This “Puppy” Test is designed to evaluate the young Drahthaar’s inherited abilities in five different categories (pointing, nose, tracking, search, and cooperation).

Fall breed Tests (HZP) are conducted each fall for the Drahthaar whelped prior to October 1st of the previous year. The HZP for the retrieving trained dog, again allows evaluation of the five qualities listed above, and adds several demanding retrieving tasks. Desire, obedience, and trainability are also important aspects of the is evaluation.

The ultimate field test for the fully trained Drahthaar is the Utility Test (VGP). This test allows evaluation in 26 categories, and 18 different hunting situations. This test is a comprehensive evaluation of the dog’s performance. Obedience is emphasized in the VGP, however, natural ability also is evaluated. Handlers of the Deutsch-Drahthaar are encouraged to strive toward the successful completion of the VGP.


I worded my question poorly. It appears that they won't register your dog for breeding purposes unless it goes through all phases of this testing program, whether you intend to track furred game or not. Here is the quote from the site to which you referred me:

"...which require that all VDD Drahthaars used for breeding must first meet certain field performance standards. This evaluation of performance is conducted at special field tests designed to demonstrate inherited qualities.

The testing program of Group North America adheres to all VDD and JGHV Test Regulations. To evaluate hunting ability, VDD/GNA sponsors Spring Natural Ability Tests (VJP), Fall Breed Tests (HZP), Fall Utility Tests (VGP), and Coat and Conformation evaluations (Breed Shows). For the purpose of breeding hunting dogs that are valued highly for versatility, the breed tests evaluate inherited ability, rather than establishing the superiority of one dog over another."

Link Posted: 6/22/2013 3:38:32 PM EST
As you can tell I run them. I am down to just one right now but will be getting a new pup next year.

If you get one and want to breed it yes you must test it. It will be tested with some fur. Mainly a rabbit track and a rabbit drag with the retrieve of it. If you don't want to breed them then don't test them.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 9:23:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Drahthaar_dude:
As you can tell I run them. I am down to just one right now but will be getting a new pup next year.

If you get one and want to breed it yes you must test it. It will be tested with some fur. Mainly a rabbit track and a rabbit drag with the retrieve of it. If you don't want to breed them then don't test them.
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Any books you would recommend on training one up? I would love to get a DD when I get home in a few years, but have never had a truly trained hunting dog of my own, and I wouldn't really know where to start.
Link Posted: 7/27/2013 2:29:22 PM EST
Drahthaar puppy manual from Altmoor. The VDD-GNA is a great place for info and the people in the club will be a great place for info.
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