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Posted: 10/6/2007 5:23:44 AM EDT
I took some photos from the last time I processed fresh pumpkins. They magically turned into a pie. The pie part is relatively simple, but I bet not many people know how to extract the pulp from a pumpkin. I'll post the pics and a full tutorial if there's interest. I didn't want to go to all the trouble of hosting the pics and doing the writeup if nobody cared. Post here if interested! MJD
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:02:00 AM EDT
sure, I'd like to know. I don't buy pumpkins becuase they're a waste if you just use them for lack o lanterns.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 7:28:10 AM EDT
Yes, I would really like to know.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 2:04:30 PM EDT
I would not mind checking that out.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 2:27:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/12/2007 10:31:46 PM EDT by ProfGAB101]
1st I put on a full Bio-hazmat suit then grab a 10# sledge hammer... Gallager's Super Smash-O-Matic

( I am severly allurgic to pumpkin )
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 2:28:40 PM EDT
I'm game.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 2:41:17 PM EDT
I've always wondered how they turned a pumpkin into pumpkin pie.


Vulcan94
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:56:58 PM EDT
I would like to know.
Thanks
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 5:43:54 AM EDT
Alrighty, since there seems to be some good interest in this I'll write it all up.

Step 1: Go find a Sugar Pumpkin or a "Pie Pumpkin", they're the same thing. They should be almost totally round and about 4 lbs. I got a bunch from Wal-Mart this year, and last year I found them at the grocery store. They should be darker orange color than a jack-o-lantern pumpkin. Don't use jack-o-lanterns! They're way too stringy and you'll wind up with terrible pie!

Step 2: Break off any remaining stem and slice the pumpkin in half. May I recommend a Sawzall to accomplish that. These little things are tough! My 8" chef's knife barely got through and it was freshly sharpened. Make sure you scoop out the seeds and strings as best you can before you go any further.

Step 3: While you're slicing your pumpkin preheat the oven to 350 or 375 (there are different opinions on temperature), I like 350 since it seems to burn it less. Wrap them in tin foil and put them into the preheated oven for 60-90 minutes depending on the size of, and how many pumpkins you're doing.

Step 4: After the pumpkin has baked, remove them from the oven and tin foil. They should look "sweaty", like this:

and dark orange on the inside, like this:


Step 5: Since they've been baked, the pulp is easy to scoop out. Use a large spoon or an ice cream scoop to remove the pulp and put it in a large bowl, or ideally a food processor. It should be fibrous, but not super stringy. If it's really stringy, put your pumpkins back in the oven for another 15 minutes.


Step 6: Use the food processor to pureé the pumpkin. The spinning blades of the food processor work best to slice up the fibers of the pumpkin so your pie will have better consistency. If you don't have a food processor, use an electric mixer. It won't work as well, but it's better than a potato masher.


Step 7: After you've mushed up your pumpkin, put the mushed pulp in a large strainer over a bowl, and put it all in the fridge. (see photo above) You need to let the pumpkin mash drain for a few hours in the fridge. Some will tell you overnight, but I don't have that kind of time. Plus, I don't want it picking up any strange odors from last week's chicken. I really should get rid of that.

Step 8: Once your pumpkin is drained, it's now ready to use in any recipe that calls for canned pumpkin. It'll taste a whole lot fresher, allow the taste of your spices to come through better, and you'll know there are no added preservatives. If you processed your pumpkin well (and have a good recipe for pie) you can create this little beauty:

I will not divulge my secret family recipe. Our friend Mrs. Smith helps out with the crust.

There are a lot of other things you can make with pumpkin too. You can do pumpkin nut bread, pumpkin soup, and even pumpkin latté. I hope this little tutorial has been helpful to you. If you have any questions I'll do my best to answer. MJD
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 9:36:33 AM EDT
File > Save Page As...





Thanks. I've always wonder how a pumpkin pie came from that mess inside a pumpkin. Had no idea that that stuff was tossed.


Vulcan94
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 5:37:17 AM EDT
Very cool. Thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 8:27:59 AM EDT
I found an awsome recipe last fall for a soup/stew you made and baked inside a pie pumpkin.
The veg portion of the meal was you scraped the insides of the pumpkin while serving.

I'll see if I can dig it up.



I usually make curried pumpkin soup when cans of pumpkin are cheap around the holidays. I bet it would taste really good w/ fresh, rather than canned pumpkin. I'll have to give it a try.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 5:09:53 PM EDT
Highwayman, Thanks for the info. Glad you said not the jackolantern type pumpkin!!
Great tutorial.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 9:03:36 PM EDT
Thanks for the info! I will give this a shot this weekend
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 5:00:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BaNo:
I found an awsome recipe last fall for a soup/stew you made and baked inside a pie pumpkin.
The veg portion of the meal was you scraped the insides of the pumpkin while serving.

I'll see if I can dig it up.



I usually make curried pumpkin soup when cans of pumpkin are cheap around the holidays. I bet it would taste really good w/ fresh, rather than canned pumpkin. I'll have to give it a try.


I'd heard about that type of meal. I always wanted to try it, but I could never find a recipe.
I don't care much for curry in any form. Other than that, it sounds mighty tasty! You'll definitely have better luck with fresh. The spices will come through much better, and the soup will have better texture. Canned pumpkin is really thick and chunky, also very dry. MJD
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 5:56:28 PM EDT
So why doesn't that big 25 pound pumpkin I bought tonight work? Too big for the oven?
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 6:53:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kletzenklueffer:
So why doesn't that big 25 pound pumpkin I bought tonight work? Too big for the oven?

Because it will taste like soggy cardboard.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:18:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/9/2007 10:18:53 PM EDT by leelaw]
I've still got 4 cups (2 pies) worth of pumpkin puree in the freezer from last year. I made 6 pies last year, and need to ease up how many friends I deem pie-worthy this year.

When I roast the pumpkin halves (or quarters, if using larger pumpkins; I usually use large white pumpkins) I usually do it in lasagna pans with abour 1/4" of standing water, to help it steam a little better. Adding molasses and brown sugar to the puree for the batter helps retain moisture, too.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 11:10:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kletzenklueffer:
So why doesn't that big 25 pound pumpkin I bought tonight work? Too big for the oven?


It'll work. Cut it into smaller pieces and roast them, then process as above.

I can post a recipe for the pie filling (spices to add to the puree) if you guys want.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 11:14:49 PM EDT
I'm going to have to tag this one.
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