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Posted: 3/8/2011 8:53:52 AM EST
Do you keep broad spectrum antibiotics in your BOB? I'm thinking about adding Cipro, Doxy and Amoxycillin as a step up from basic cold meds and imodium. Any other's recommended? The intent is that these would not be taken lightly but would be good to have if needed.
Link Posted: 3/8/2011 9:10:13 AM EST
Flagil for stomach bugs is also a good one to have. Since I sail for a living, I have a doctor who prescribes antibiotics etc in advance for me to take along to whatever 3rd world hole I end up in next. I generally do not rely on the ships hospital. I usually have Cipro, Z-Paks, Clindamycin and Flagil. Since I always have my teeth cleaned before I sail, I also carry Oxycodone and Tylanol #3's in case of infection pain. Couple those with the Yellow Fever shot and such, and all GTG.
Link Posted: 3/8/2011 10:15:13 AM EST
Prep noob question....

What's the shelf life on this stuff and how do you get it? I thought that stuff had to be prescribed?

Link Posted: 3/8/2011 10:21:15 AM EST
The only antibiotics I know have a short shelf life. What are you using that has longevity and can handle heat/etc.?
Link Posted: 3/8/2011 10:53:37 AM EST
Huh?
Link Posted: 3/8/2011 11:40:04 AM EST
I typically have travel meds at the ready and travel fairly regularly to areas with food/waterborne issues. These meds are easily prescribed by visiting a travel medicine doctor and requesting them. These would not be stored in a car trunk but kept ready in a suitable storage area.

Cipro is a godsend if you need it. Trust me on this one.
Link Posted: 3/8/2011 2:25:07 PM EST
Yes, I keep quinolones on hand
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:34:54 PM EST
Excellent question!
My BOB medical kit has Amoxicillin 500mg x 40.
Broad spectrum antibiotics are a prescription only medication.
They are also non-habit forming and not prone to abuse (can't get high on antibiotics!).
Therefore, my experience has been that a reasonable MD will write you a prescription if you explain why you want it.
TIP: use the phrase 'emergency preparedness' , not 'survivalist'!
Yes, they do have a limited shelf life, but they are also generic and therefore, cheap!
Also, bear in mind that once a medication, which does not need to be stored under special conditions (e.g. insulin), has reached it's 'Discard By' date, does not mean it becomes worthless. It just means that the potency of the med starts to decrease. Eventually you reach the point where they are useless, but 6 months after the use by date - still of great worth.
So, if the SHTF tomorrow and I needed to use my Amoxicillin which technically expired in October 2010, I would simply increase the dosage according to the amount of time it is past it's use by date.
Another interesting thing about 'human' antibiotics is that they can be used safely on your pet cat should the need arise.
Obviously, you need to decrease the dose mathematically according to body weight - too much will be toxic. But if a vet is not available for your 'kitteh', you can do this with caution.
Don't know about dogs - didn't bother to ask the vet because I hate dogs.
Message me privately if you want more info. Perhaps you can answer some questions or have some tips to share with me.
As per standard practice, don't believe anything you read in a forum - verify all info with your MD / Pharmacist / Veterinarian!

PS: If you find an MD who will write a prescription for pain meds for your BOB, please let me know!
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:43:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By Smallbore_Freak:
Prep noob question....

What's the shelf life on this stuff and how do you get it? I thought that stuff had to be prescribed?



Well that's a helpful tone.
I think it's a very relevant and intelligent question!
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 11:10:01 AM EST
Originally Posted By Smallbore_Freak:
Prep noob question....

What's the shelf life on this stuff and how do you get it? I thought that stuff had to be prescribed?



Shelf life for most antibiotics is long.

I've taken ten YO amoxil with good results. Same for old vet tetracycline.

[In before all the scary "tetracycline becomes posionous" folks]
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 1:15:19 PM EST
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By Smallbore_Freak:
Prep noob question....

What's the shelf life on this stuff and how do you get it? I thought that stuff had to be prescribed?



Shelf life for most antibiotics is long.

I've taken ten YO amoxil with good results. Same for old vet tetracycline.

[In before all the scary "tetracycline becomes posionous" folks]



It may not kill you, but the reality is that old tetracycline can cause kidney damage. Just because you didn't immediately drop dead does not mean it didn't do some damage, the symptoms of which may become more pronounced as you get older and your renal function naturally deteriorates. Those with pre-existing kidney problems would be wise to avoid old stuff.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 9:06:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/15/2011 9:11:13 PM EST by Slug64]
Yes I understand that it "can" after a VERY VERY long time but in the situation one would encounter to "truly" find the need I doubt later in life kidney damage is going to rate very high considering a life threating infection in a TEOTWAWKI scenario.

From what I've read of the military testing biotics they last a VERY long time. The turn over on the bottle is to promote big pharma profits.

Ive also taken 8-10 year amox as well as others and Highly doubt I will magically awake at 60 with kidney "damage".

I keep a large supply for my fish what can I say I love them and would hate to see them have fin rot.
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 7:44:14 AM EST
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fanconi_syndrome

educate yourself about what taking expired tetracyclines can do to your body.

If you are looking for something for long term storage, I would find something other than tetracyclines. If you do buy tetracyclines, make sure to record and abide by the expiration date.

Something to note, pharmacies such as Kroger and Wal-Mart, etc. may offer many antibiotics for the $4 for 10 day supply with a prescription. I would recommend trying to get a prescription for the entire bottle and ask the pharmacy before hand not to open the sealed container. The medicine will keep much better in the sealed container. Many containers contain dessicants to reduce moisture absorption by the tablets. Keep in mind also that these stock bottles are not always small, but #100 cipro 500mg would go a long way and could treat up to 5 people in case of emergency. If you opt to get a smaller amount, you may ask the pharmacist if he has a spare dessicant pouch from another bottle laying around. This may help ensure that the meds retain more of their activity for a longer duration of time.
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