Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 1/6/2012 10:31:35 AM EDT
Where can I find this?

List of antibiotics, their uses, and dosages.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:33:58 AM EDT
In for the info.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:36:13 AM EDT
taggage
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:41:53 AM EDT
subscribed
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:42:31 AM EDT
Sorry, it ain't that easy.

Sanford Guide

Or try going to medical school.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:42:46 AM EDT
This might be a good start:

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:53:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By parabellum_9x19:
This might be a good start:



I found that too, but can't find info for Doxy, Cipro, etc.


Seems like it would be out there somewhere. There are several doc's on here, maybe they could chime in.

I'm just looking for a simple table that lists antibiotics –– common infections they treat –– normal dosage.

I know there's more to it, but if there is no doc available, at least this might prevent antibiotic misuse. Also, pediatric dosage by weight would be a bonus.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:55:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 10:58:58 AM EDT by Centuryhouse]
INFECTIONS

Strep Throat
Penicillin V, Amoxicillin, Cephalexin, Azithromycin

Pneumonia (mild to moderate, uncomplicated)
Azithromycin, Amoxicillin, Augmentiin, Doxycycline, Levofloxacin
Pneumonia (severe, complicated)
IV medication is needed

Mild Skin Infections
Cephalexin, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin
Moderate Skin Infections
EITHER Clindamycin or Penicillin V potassium AND Doxycycline or Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
Severe Skin Infections
If it is an extensive infection or very rapidly spreading, IV medication is needed
Erysipelas (Skin Infection)
Mild: Penicillin V potassium or Amoxicillin; Severe: IV medication is needed

Bite Wounds (Mild): Animal Bites
Augmentin; Doxycyline or Trimeth.-sulfameth. or Penicillin VK PLUS Metronidazole or Clindamycin
Bite Wounds (Mild): Human Bites
Augmentin; Doxycyline or Trimeth.-sulfameth. or Penicillin VK or Cipro. PLUS Metronidazole or
Clindamycin
Bite Wounds: Infected
IV medication is needed; Surgery is likely needed

Bacterial Inner Ear Infections
Amoxicillin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Augmentin

Bacterial Outer Ear Infections
Cipro HC Otic (ear), Cortisporin Otic Suspension/Solution (ear)

Bacterial Eye Infections
Erythromycin Ophthalmic, Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic Ointment

Urinary Tract Infections
Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin, Cephalexin, Doxycycline

Kidney Infections
Levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole PLUS Amoxicillin

Travelers Diarrhea
Ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, Azithromycin, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

Cholera
Oral rehydration therapy and/or IV rehydration is first line; Doxycycline, Ciprofloxacin

Giardia
Metronidazole

Serious GI Infections
Many of these infections will need IV medications; Milder cases may benefit w/ Augmentin,
Ciprofloxacin, Metronidazole

Tick-Borne Diseases
Doxycycline

Anthrax
Doxycycline, Levofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Clindamycin

Plague
Doxycycline, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, Tetracycline

ANTIBIOTICS

Amoxicillin (Amoxil)
Community Acquired Pneumonia: 500-1,000 mg PO three times daily for 7-10 days
Bacterial Inner Ear Infection: Mild-Mod: 500 mg PO twice daily or 250 mg PO three times daily;
Severe: 875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily

Amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium (Augmentin)
Bacterial Inner Ear Infection: 875 mg PO twice daily
Acute bacterial sinus infection: Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for 10
days
Community Acquired Pneumonia: Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for
7-10 days
Skin abscess: 875 mg PO twice daily
Bite Wounds (Human/animal): 875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily
Kidney Infection (uncomplicated): 875 mg PO twice daily or 500 mg PO three times daily
Diverticulitis, Perirectal abscess: Extended release Tablets: Two 1000 mg tablets PO twice daily for
7-10 days

Azithromycin (Zithromax)
Mild-to-mod respiratory tract, skin, soft tissue infxns: 500 mg PO in a single loading dose on day 1
followed by 250 mg PO daily on days 2-5
Community Acquired Pneumonia: 500 mg IV daily for at least 2 days, then 500 mg PO daily to
complete a 7- to 10-day course of therapy
Bacterial Sinus Infection: 500 mg PO daily for 3 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Traveler's Diarrhea: 500 mg PO daily for 1-3 days or 1 gram PO in a single
dose
STD Infections (Chlamydia, Chancroid, Gonorrhea): Chlamydia, Chancroid: 1 gram PO one time;
Gonorrhea 2 grams PO one time

Cephalexin (Keflex)
Mild skin infection (small abscess, boils, etc.): 250 mg PO four times daily (max 4,000 mg in 24 hrs)
Moderate skin infection (mastitis, cellulitis, etc.): 500 mg PO four times daily (max 4,000 mg in 24
hrs)
Acute bacterial pharyngitis ("Strep throat"): 500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Uncomplicated Urinary Tract (Bladder) Infections: 500 mg PO twice daily for 7-14 days

Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
Anthrax (inhalational - prophylaxis): 500 mg PO twice daily for 60 days or 400 mg IV twice daily for
60 days
Anthrax (inhalational, GI, skin - treatment): 400 mg IV twice daily initially then transition to 500 mg
PO twice daily for total of 60 days
Bone/Joint Infection: Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 4-6 weeks; Severe: 400 mg
IV three times daily for 4-6 weeks
Skin Infections: Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days; Severe: 400 mg IV
three times daily for 7-14 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea: Mild: 750 mg PO x 1 dose; Severe: 500 mg PO twice daily
for 3 days
Infectious Diarrhea - Shigella or Salmonella: 500 mg PO twice daily for 3-7 days
Infectious Diarrhea – Cholera: 1 gram PO x one dose
Abdominal Infections (Diverticulitis, Abscess, etc.): 500 mg PO twice daily or 400 mg IV twice daily
for 7-14 days
Lung Infections: Mild: 500-750 mg PO or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days; Severe: 400 mg IV
three times daily for 7-14 days
Typhoid Fever: 500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Bacterial Sinus Infection: 500 mg PO twice daily for 10 days
Urinary Tract (Bladder) / Kidney Infection: Mild: 250 mg PO or 200 mg IV twice daily for 3 days;
Severe: 500 mg PO twice daily or 400 mg IV twice daily for 7-14 days

Clindamycin (Cleosin)
Anthrax: 900 mg IV every 8 hours with ciprofloxacin or doxycycline
Bite wounds (canine): 300 mg PO four times daily; take with a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin,
levofloxacin)
Skin infections: 150-300 mg PO four times daily; Use with Doxycycline or Trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole
(Bactrim, Septra)
Severe nose/throat infections: 150-450 mg PO four times daily for at least 7 days (max 1,800 mg per
24 hrs)

Doxycycline
Tick borne diseases: 100 mg PO twice daily for 14-21 days
Infectious Diarrhea – Cholera: 300 mg PO as a single dose
STD, Urinary Infections: 100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 7-28 days
Lung infections: 100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 7-14 days
Anthrax (inhalational - prophylaxis): 100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 60 days (PO preferred)
Anthrax (inhalational, GI, skin - treatment): 100 mg PO/IV twice daily for 60 days (IV for initial
treatment, then switch to PO)

Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
Skin Infections: Uncomplicated: 500 mg PO daily for 7-10 days; Complicated: 750 mg PO daily for 7-
14 days
Lung Infections (community acquired pneumonia): 500 mg PO/IV daily for 7-14 days or 750 mg
PO/IV daily for 5 days
Lung Infections (serious lung infections/pneumonia): 750 mg PO/IV daily for 7-14 days
Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections: 250 mg PO/IV daily for 3 days
Complicated: Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections: 250 mg PO/IV daily for 10 days or 750 PO/IV daily for
5 days
Anthrax (inhalational): 500 mg PO daily for 60 days beginning ASAP after exposure

Metronidazole (Flagyl)
Bacterial Vaginosis: 500 mg PO twice daily for 7 days
Trichomonas Infection: 250 mg PO three times daily for 7 days or 2 grams PO as a single dose
Anaerobic GI Infection (Diverticulitis, Abscess, etc.): 500 mg PO/IV every 6-8 hrs (max dose 4 grams
daily)
Giardia Infection: 500 mg PO twice daily for 5-7 days
Amoeba Infection: 500-750 mg PO three times daily for 5-10 days

Penicillin VK (Penicillin V potassium)
Acute bacterial pharyngitis ("Strep throat"): 500 mg PO 3-4 times daily for 10 days
Skin infections (Erysipelas): 500 mg PO four times daily
Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)
DOSING
Single Strength (SS) Tablet: Sulfamethoxazole 400 mg and trimethoprim 80 mg
Double Strength (DS) Tablet is 2 SS tabs in one tablet
USE
Urinary Tract /Kidney Infections: 1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 3-5 days (Mild); for 7-10 days
(complicated); for 14 days (Kidney Infection)
Infectious Diarrhea - Travelers Diarrhea/Shigella: 1 DS Tablet PO twice a day for 5 days
Skin Infections (including MRSA): 1-2 DS Tablets PO twice a day

Obtaining Prescription meds:
I think the main prescription medicines that people would like access to are pain meds, epinepherine
injectables, and antibiotics.

Pain meds - This is almost impossible for a person to get a prescription for if you do not need it
immediately. This is the type of medicine that physicians WILL get in to trouble for prescribing
without an active diagnosis. If you ask for some when you don't need it, you will be labelled a drug
seeker, and the physician will be very concerned about what illegal activity you are involved. To be
honest, even when a person does need it, if they ask for a presciption-only pain med, physicians will
be skeptical. I'm not saying that is right. I'm just saying how it is.

My advice: Unfortunately, just don't ask for it. If you have a medical condition that requires some of it,
try not to use it all and save the rest. Nothing illegal about that. It is your medicine prescribed to you.
But you also have to remember that these medicines are prescription only for a reason... real harm,
addiction, and death can, has, and does occur because of these medicines. Be wise as a serpent
and innocent as a dove.

Antibiotics - Very tough one. There is way too much overprescription when it is not needed, and
then physicians won't prescribe some for a person to use when it is needed (but just not yet). The big
problem with having antibiotics on hand to use when... is that most of you did not train for years and
years and have seen hundreds or thousands of patients to determine the difference between a
condition that needs no antibiotics, oral antibiotics, IV antibiotics, or IV antibiotics and surgical
intervention. If you make the wrong choice because you thought wrong, someone could die. I am not
trying to be over dramatic, or to say that physicians are never wrong (Lord knows that is not true).
That is why we call it the practice of medicine. But we have a lot more practice. Heck, even Michael
Jordan still practiced basketball, but I would want him on my team.

My advice: I think it is very legitimate to ask for an antibiotic prescription to treat Travelers Diarrhea
before a trip - just in case. If you don't need it, save it in an airtight, dark, cool, dry place. Most other
antibiotics will be harder to ask for legitimately.

Sorry for not being able to give a great method to acquire some of these medicines. But I think the
knowledge of what to use is still very important. In a TEOTWAWKI situation, no prescription will be
needed. But you will have to know what to barter/scrounge for effectively. This information may help.
Doc K

Questions:
Q: If we are able to get excess antibiotics....what is the best method to prolong their shelf life?
A: If you have medicine that you are not going to use for some time, you want to store it in a cool, dry,
dark, airtight location.
Air, moisture, heat, and light are the enemies.
Vacuum seal with an oxygen absorber and dessicant (silica) packet followed by storing in an opaque
(doesn't allow light in) box in the basement or refrigerator would be the ideal location for most
medications, and will give the longest shelf life.
This isn't practical for a lot of people, but it is the best. The closest you can get to these conditions
will allow the medicine to last as long as possible.
Most pharmacies will put an expiration date of one year from the filling date of the prescription on the
bottle. This is not the same date as the original, airtight packaging.
As I said earlier, we do not know how long most medicines will last and still work. It is likely much
longer (3-10+ years??) than the original expiration date if kept in ideal conditions, maybe longer. But
if it is kept in the big bottle from the pharmacy in your car for 3 months... I wouldn't trust it to work for
too long.

Q: I wanted to know, what natural remedies would you recommend as sufficient substitutes
for some of these medications? Two possibilities that immediately came to my mind was
willow bark instead of Aspirin and caprylic acid as an antifungal. I'd be interested to hear your
take on these and any others you care to share about.
I've read your post here (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=8782.0) about
your thoughts on herbal medicine and found it very balanced and helpful. I was wondering if
you might be willing to elaborate on the specifics if which herbs you think generally "work".
A: That is another one of my projects. I hope to provide a thorough review of the most useful,
reliable, and readily available herbal and alternative/complimentary medicines out there. As I said in
the above post, I think there is a place for herbal medicine in the "modern" world. If the modern world
stops being so modern (like after a solar flare EMP or other calamity), all we may have are plant
based medicines. I feel that physicians need to understand what works and doesn't and why, as well
as what is safe.
I hope in the near future to have the time to devote a post to these medicines. Stay tuned!

Q: And...one thing to add to the discussion about Doxycycline and prolonged storage, since
it's so handy to keep around for tickborne rickettsial diseases. As tempting as it is to hang
onto Doxycycline, it can degrade with prolonged storage, and can cause acute renal failure
(laypeople read as: general kidney BADness) if it is used too long after the expiration date.
A: Really important point here. As I said in earlier posts, some medicines can last well for years, and
other medicines won’t be safe long term. We don’t know which is which unfortunately, as that
information is not made public.
However, we do know that any medicine that ends with “–cyline” will be UNSAFE for long term
storage.

Q: One quick question. The major problem faced by diabetics is their inability to store
sufficient quantities of insulin long term. Would reverting to oral meds such as Metformin
(because they are easier to store) be of any benefit? In other words, would they lower BS at
all?
A: Good question. Insulin does not store well long term.
Unfortunately, Metformin (Glucophage) does have the potential to cause a deadly lactic acidosis. I
left this one off the list on purpose, because without a lab to watch for kidney function this medicine
would potentially be very unsafe. But if the alternative is death from diabetic ketoacidosis, then I may
risk it. Metformin also has the unfortunate side effect of causing severe GI upset, nausea, vomiting,
and diarrhea in some people when they first start taking it. When I prescribe this medicine, I always
start at a low dose and work up to the treatment dose needed.
If you had a lab (or no other options) here is the dosing:
Metformin (Glucophage) - Immediate Release Form
Start with 500 mg by mouth daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth twice daily for a week;
Then increase to 500 mg by mouth in the a.m. and 1,000 mg by mouth in the p.m.
You can work your way up to 850-1,000 mg by mouth twice a day (I wouldn’t go any higher without a
laboratory available).
Metformin (Glucophage) – Extended Release (ER) Form
Start with 500 mg ER by mouth one time daily for a week;
Increase by 500 mg ER daily every week to an final dose of 1,000-2,000 mg total ER daily.

(Got this from The Survival Podcast Forum Doc K’s Medicine List)
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:59:56 AM EDT
The above is...beautiful.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:02:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ThePatriot556:
The above is...beautiful.


Yeah no kidding that is awesome. Thanks so much for this.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:08:02 AM EDT
you can look up all the drugs at drugs.com it also lists dosages for different sicknesses. I cut at pasted all the ones I have into a word document.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:11:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By readyornot:
you can look up all the drugs at drugs.com it also lists dosages for different sicknesses. I cut at pasted all the ones I have into a word document.

And you haven't posted it because...
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:17:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:

Originally Posted By readyornot:
you can look up all the drugs at drugs.com it also lists dosages for different sicknesses. I cut at pasted all the ones I have into a word document.

And you haven't posted it because...


I too would be much obliged if you would post this...

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:17:40 AM EDT
Printed that. Thanks.

I notice that Cipro is a very useful drug for a wide range of stuff. I used to bring it back from Mexico, but I understand that's a no go now. Also, I don't see myself going there again, soon.

What about the internet drug houses for this?
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:25:10 AM EDT
Thank you Centuryhouse. That is one of the most useful guides ever posted here.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:26:57 AM EDT
tagtastic
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:36:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By UT-ARShooter:
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:

Originally Posted By readyornot:
you can look up all the drugs at drugs.com it also lists dosages for different sicknesses. I cut at pasted all the ones I have into a word document.

And you haven't posted it because...


I too would be much obliged if you would post this...



Sorry, I don't feel comfortable posting info that could be fatal. It's also in one huge word document with all my other must have info. It is easy to get though, for example
http://www.drugs.com/ciprofloxacin.html
and for more click on Dosage Information on the right side. They will also print nicely if you click the "Print" link on the page as it will format the page for printing.
all the other drugs can be found using the search box at the top of the page.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 12:17:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 12:18:47 PM EDT by Centuryhouse]
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
Thank you Centuryhouse. That is one of the most useful guides ever posted here.


You're welcome - I just snagged it and put that together on a Word doc last week, it seems like a very useful overview.

Go HERE for the original source, which includes even more stuff which I didn't include in my list.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 12:22:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 12:24:24 PM EDT by tc556guy]
http://soyouthinkyouready.com/2011/04/18/antibiotic-use-in-teotwawki-by-georgiadoc/

I have a few medications docs in my collection but the only cheat sheet per se other than Docs was from a site whose link no longer works. though.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 12:29:23 PM EDT
So many issues with this, hard to know where to start.

The guide posted earlier is good, actually, covers a lot of stuff.

drugs and dosages can vary based on age, history, severity, etc., no hard and fast rules to post.

Having said that, you guys might be interested in emedicine.medscape reference

and in particular, the infectious disease section

this site is a remarkable compendium of everything medical and surgical, broken down by specialty and designed for providers, although it is available to anyone who wants to look.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 3:27:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bones45:
Sorry, it ain't that easy.

Sanford Guide

Or try going to medical school.

This!

My advice is get a Sanford Guide - it's small, light, cheap, and an excellent resource.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 3:58:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 4:03:00 PM EDT by Benjamin-Linus]
Antibiotic Pocket Card 2011


Page One: list of illnesses (broken into sections like respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, blood, heart, eyes, etc) with which antibiotics are effective. Also a ruler along one edge of the card.
Page Two: continuation of page one with illnesses of the skin and soft tissue, bones, joints, urogenital tract, fever. The second half of this page is on bacteria with multiple antibiotic resistances and special circumstances.
Page Three: A chart showing organism (e.g. streptococci, Salmonella) and boxes indicating if a antibiotic is effective, first choice, alternative, low effectiveness, not recommended. Also color codes the organisms to indicate if it is gram-positive, gram-negative, or membraneless. (This page is the most helpful of the four pages IMHO).
Page Four: generic names, trade names, dosage, cost per day, bio availability, elimination, penetration, adverse effects
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:37:08 PM EDT
One thing not to discount is drug resistant and multi-drug resistant organisms. Hospitals will culture organisms and ensure that the drug given will kill it often-times before giving antibiotics. Your drug won't work If the organism you have is resistant. That's the only issue I have with stocking up on a "shotgun" antibiotic. Something may be better than nothing but it's almost impossible to have 2 or 3 drugs that will cure most anything. We can be creating the next MRSA or VRE if we aren't careful.

jd1
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 5:31:53 AM EDT
I would like to add meds to my preps but what is the shelf life for antibiotics
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 5:40:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Benjamin-Linus:
Antibiotic Pocket Card 2011
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31lY9rQ3yRL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Page One: list of illnesses (broken into sections like respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, blood, heart, eyes, etc) with which antibiotics are effective. Also a ruler along one edge of the card.
Page Two: continuation of page one with illnesses of the skin and soft tissue, bones, joints, urogenital tract, fever. The second half of this page is on bacteria with multiple antibiotic resistances and special circumstances.
Page Three: A chart showing organism (e.g. streptococci, Salmonella) and boxes indicating if a antibiotic is effective, first choice, alternative, low effectiveness, not recommended. Also color codes the organisms to indicate if it is gram-positive, gram-negative, or membraneless. (This page is the most helpful of the four pages IMHO).
Page Four: generic names, trade names, dosage, cost per day, bio availability, elimination, penetration, adverse effects


Is that available in a pdf?
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 7:11:32 AM EDT
I'll start by saying, I am not a medical professional, use the following at your own risk.

Very useful, if not concise, pdf in this thread's first post.

This requires a paid subscription but looks like it may contain some of the info you are after. I can't read it, but it may be more geared towards medical research since it is from Sigma. Not sure.

Here is some peds info, with dosing.

This table will likely require some medical knowledge to interpret. Again, don't use it if you don't understand it.

Actually, just go here, it will save me some typing.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 7:51:39 AM EDT
Originally Posted By JAMES77257:
Originally Posted By Benjamin-Linus:
Antibiotic Pocket Card 2011
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31lY9rQ3yRL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Page One: list of illnesses (broken into sections like respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, blood, heart, eyes, etc) with which antibiotics are effective. Also a ruler along one edge of the card.
Page Two: continuation of page one with illnesses of the skin and soft tissue, bones, joints, urogenital tract, fever. The second half of this page is on bacteria with multiple antibiotic resistances and special circumstances.
Page Three: A chart showing organism (e.g. streptococci, Salmonella) and boxes indicating if a antibiotic is effective, first choice, alternative, low effectiveness, not recommended. Also color codes the organisms to indicate if it is gram-positive, gram-negative, or membraneless. (This page is the most helpful of the four pages IMHO).
Page Four: generic names, trade names, dosage, cost per day, bio availability, elimination, penetration, adverse effects


Is that available in a pdf?


I did some looking for a PDF version of it but never found one. I eventually just bought two of them from amazon. They are printed on plastic sheets and completely waterproof. So for six bucks I am happy with it. It may yet be out there in the web sphere as a PDF but I never found it.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 9:42:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By palmetto:
Printed that. Thanks.

I notice that Cipro is a very useful drug for a wide range of stuff. I used to bring it back from Mexico, but I understand that's a no go now. Also, I don't see myself going there again, soon.

What about the internet drug houses for this?


Be careful with Cipro as one of the possible problems is tendon rupture. http://www.webmd.com/osteoarthritis/news/20080708/fda-warning-cipro-may-rupture-tendons
Not a drug to be taken lightly.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 9:51:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Benjamin-Linus:

I did some looking for a PDF version of it but never found one. I eventually just bought two of them from amazon. They are printed on plastic sheets and completely waterproof. So for six bucks I am happy with it. It may yet be out there in the web sphere as a PDF but I never found it.



I bet its copyrighted in its current format. So may not be raedily available as a PDF.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:32:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Canoeguy:
Originally Posted By ThePatriot556:
The above is...beautiful.


Yeah no kidding that is awesome. Thanks so much for this.


Link Posted: 1/7/2012 2:24:40 PM EDT

Q: And...one thing to add to the discussion about Doxycycline and prolonged storage, since
it's so handy to keep around for tickborne rickettsial diseases. As tempting as it is to hang
onto Doxycycline, it can degrade with prolonged storage, and can cause acute renal failure
(laypeople read as: general kidney BADness) if it is used too long after the expiration date.
A: Really important point here. As I said in earlier posts, some medicines can last well for years, and
other medicines won’t be safe long term. We don’t know which is which unfortunately, as that
information is not made public.
However, we do know that any medicine that ends with “–cyline” will be UNSAFE for long term
storage.




Hasn't this been address in multiple threads before and attributed to earlier formulas of doxy?
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 3:27:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1fromtx:

In for the info.


Link Posted: 1/7/2012 5:35:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Benjamin-Linus:
Originally Posted By JAMES77257:
Originally Posted By Benjamin-Linus:
Antibiotic Pocket Card 2011
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31lY9rQ3yRL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Page One: list of illnesses (broken into sections like respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, blood, heart, eyes, etc) with which antibiotics are effective. Also a ruler along one edge of the card.
Page Two: continuation of page one with illnesses of the skin and soft tissue, bones, joints, urogenital tract, fever. The second half of this page is on bacteria with multiple antibiotic resistances and special circumstances.
Page Three: A chart showing organism (e.g. streptococci, Salmonella) and boxes indicating if a antibiotic is effective, first choice, alternative, low effectiveness, not recommended. Also color codes the organisms to indicate if it is gram-positive, gram-negative, or membraneless. (This page is the most helpful of the four pages IMHO).
Page Four: generic names, trade names, dosage, cost per day, bio availability, elimination, penetration, adverse effects


Is that available in a pdf?


I did some looking for a PDF version of it but never found one. I eventually just bought two of them from amazon. They are printed on plastic sheets and completely waterproof. So for six bucks I am happy with it. It may yet be out there in the web sphere as a PDF but I never found it.



Got a scanner?
Top Top