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Posted: 3/24/2015 4:15:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 4:24:40 PM EDT
In before title change...

ETA: (Before title change) That doesn't look like a bore to me.  Looks like awesome times!
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 4:54:13 PM EDT
I thought this would be a thread about a giant hole.
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 5:34:28 PM EDT
That's a lot of pork chops!
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 5:49:44 PM EDT
That is quite a bore.
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 5:57:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 6:08:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 6:26:34 PM EDT
That is a monster boar hog for sure, bet he did allot of damage before his demise.

That top of the line D-790 NV scope it a killer kit for sure!
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 7:18:04 PM EDT
Good hunt!  Hope you get many more.  and full stories and maybe videos????  Thanks for the pic
Link Posted: 3/24/2015 10:54:58 PM EDT
HOLY CRAP!!  In for more info on the kill.
Link Posted: 3/25/2015 10:04:51 AM EDT
That is a prime example of some hardcore porknography right there in the raw!
Link Posted: 3/25/2015 12:22:58 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/25/2015 4:06:09 PM EDT
Holy crap, I thought that was a big pig when I thought the shooter was 6'.....
Link Posted: 3/25/2015 4:09:47 PM EDT


That's a big one, any idea what cartridge he used?


Link Posted: 3/25/2015 5:23:52 PM EDT
Looks like an awesome hunt, congrats!!!!
Link Posted: 3/26/2015 6:04:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/26/2015 7:32:06 PM EDT
I could get into that type of Hogging...
Link Posted: 3/26/2015 9:10:56 PM EDT
Nice write up!
Link Posted: 3/27/2015 11:59:38 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/27/2015 1:47:50 PM EDT
Anybody know how long it takes a pig to get that big?



He's at least 4 years old since Vic saw him on camera before, but he had to have been several years old already?




Whats the life span of a wild pig?  10 yrs?  15 years?
Link Posted: 3/27/2015 3:00:46 PM EDT
Great photos, story, and report.  I always appreciate it when hunter takes the time to record his tale.  The explanation of him being a "bar" was especially interesting.  Learned something today.

Job well done all around.
Link Posted: 3/30/2015 1:30:58 AM EDT
Hot damn!!

Quick question, why was he castrated?

Was he a farm pig that escaped?
Link Posted: 3/30/2015 1:39:30 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Here is the synopsis of the shoot from our TNVC family shooter...
Because he was a Bar, he had none of the tell-tale stench of a typical pig of this size.  The meat was clean and covered with a thick layer of fat.  We are definitely looking forward to getting this meat back from the processor.    

Vic
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Still lost on this concept of bar.
Link Posted: 3/30/2015 3:04:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/30/2015 3:12:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/30/2015 3:14:57 PM EDT
We have "Bar" eunuchs at are place too, they do put on more weight over the years and tend to be loners.
Link Posted: 3/30/2015 3:16:19 PM EDT
Cool story and good shooting!  What a pig
Link Posted: 3/31/2015 1:16:20 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
The question of a "Bar" has come up, in a couple posts.  It is probably a local term, used here in South Georgia.  But, I don't really know.  Here's the skinny:

It refers to a pig that has been captured, castrated and then released.  On our property, we live trap our wild hog population.  We have a special cut-cage that we chase them into and then lift with the tractor.  Their legs fall through the openings and they are pinned.  After castration, we clip the tail off at the rump, in order to more readily identify the ones that have been cut.  These "Bars" will become more elusive and, will rapidly start to grow.  They also tend to run together.  They put on a large covering of fat and, they also lose the typical stench that a large, wild boar (still with his goodies) will have.  Probably this is due to the loss of testosterone.  What you end up with is a stable of good-eating, very large, non-reproducing pigs.
 
Our pigs are a mix of the more wild razorback version and the more domestic style of feral pig.  The difference between the two is usually on either end. The snout is longer on the more wild versions and, the tails will be straight.  The feral ones will have the shorter snouts and the curly tails.  How much of each trait is purely dependent on their lineage.  We also see a tendency towards the higher, longer, higher-bristled back on the wild ones.  However, this trait seems to get mixed in a lot quicker than the snouts and tails.

Hope that helps!

Be Safe
View Quote


Cleared it up quite nicely. Very well put together little blurb.  Thanks!
Link Posted: 3/31/2015 2:58:21 AM EDT
Good Lord.
Link Posted: 3/31/2015 3:19:07 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Cleared it up quite nicely. Very well put together little blurb.  Thanks!
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
The question of a "Bar" has come up, in a couple posts.  It is probably a local term, used here in South Georgia.  But, I don't really know.  Here's the skinny:

It refers to a pig that has been captured, castrated and then released.  On our property, we live trap our wild hog population.  We have a special cut-cage that we chase them into and then lift with the tractor.  Their legs fall through the openings and they are pinned.  After castration, we clip the tail off at the rump, in order to more readily identify the ones that have been cut.  These "Bars" will become more elusive and, will rapidly start to grow.  They also tend to run together.  They put on a large covering of fat and, they also lose the typical stench that a large, wild boar (still with his goodies) will have.  Probably this is due to the loss of testosterone.  What you end up with is a stable of good-eating, very large, non-reproducing pigs.
 
Our pigs are a mix of the more wild razorback version and the more domestic style of feral pig.  The difference between the two is usually on either end. The snout is longer on the more wild versions and, the tails will be straight.  The feral ones will have the shorter snouts and the curly tails.  How much of each trait is purely dependent on their lineage.  We also see a tendency towards the higher, longer, higher-bristled back on the wild ones.  However, this trait seems to get mixed in a lot quicker than the snouts and tails.

Hope that helps!

Be Safe


Cleared it up quite nicely. Very well put together little blurb.  Thanks!




x2
Link Posted: 4/13/2015 12:39:03 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
x2
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

The question of a "Bar" has come up, in a couple posts.  It is probably a local term, used here in South Georgia.  But, I don't really know.  Here's the skinny:



It refers to a pig that has been captured, castrated and then released.  On our property, we live trap our wild hog population.  We have a special cut-cage that we chase them into and then lift with the tractor.  Their legs fall through the openings and they are pinned.  After castration, we clip the tail off at the rump, in order to more readily identify the ones that have been cut.  These "Bars" will become more elusive and, will rapidly start to grow.  They also tend to run together.  They put on a large covering of fat and, they also lose the typical stench that a large, wild boar (still with his goodies) will have.  Probably this is due to the loss of testosterone.  What you end up with is a stable of good-eating, very large, non-reproducing pigs.

 

Our pigs are a mix of the more wild razorback version and the more domestic style of feral pig.  The difference between the two is usually on either end. The snout is longer on the more wild versions and, the tails will be straight.  The feral ones will have the shorter snouts and the curly tails.  How much of each trait is purely dependent on their lineage.  We also see a tendency towards the higher, longer, higher-bristled back on the wild ones.  However, this trait seems to get mixed in a lot quicker than the snouts and tails.



Hope that helps!



Be Safe




Cleared it up quite nicely. Very well put together little blurb.  Thanks!

x2
x3

 
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