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Posted: 3/4/2011 7:24:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/7/2011 7:34:03 PM EDT by Quarterbore]
I normally buy tuna in water but after seeing this video I think when it is time for me to rotate my supplies again I will look for the small cans of tuna in oil instead!  Mainly I would want the lamp for emergency heat in the winter but this is so simple I could likely already do it with the gear in my GHB if I had the tuna in oil!



EDIT - OK so I tried this tonight after a couple shopping stops!  I only needed two items as follows:
Bleached Medium Flat Braid Candle Wick (It was like $2 for 6-feet) - I used about 2.5 inches!





Can of Starkest Chunk Light Tuna in Vegetable Oil (it was the cheapest tuna I could find - about $0.79 for the can
Here are the photos:






I started the lamp at 10:10PM tonight and it burnt until 12:24 so this burnt for exactly 2hr and 14 minutes!  When I first started the wick it snapped a little but that stopped in the first minute of burning and the flame was nice and steady up to about the last 15-minutes when it started to die down, would make a snapping sound, and then eventually went out on it's own.
There was no strong fish smell from doing this and the can smells fine.  I am not really interested in a tuna sandwich at 1:00 AM so I will eat this tomorrow  but certainly I have no worries about tuna from this experiment.
 
Link Posted: 3/4/2011 7:41:10 AM EDT
Atomic Shrimp FTW? (haha)
Link Posted: 3/4/2011 10:12:24 AM EDT


New version of the betty lamp. It requires a certain style of wick. Not all cotton string will wick the oil well enough to work.

Link Posted: 3/4/2011 11:11:38 AM EDT
Where do i find that string?
Link Posted: 3/4/2011 11:57:58 AM EDT
That's pretty awesome. Guess the tuna has to be for breakfast though.
Link Posted: 3/4/2011 12:49:18 PM EDT
That's pretty cool QB.
Link Posted: 3/4/2011 1:26:15 PM EDT
Instead of improvising something(which isn't a bad ability to have) you could always buy a few lamp kits and have the proper supplies on hand to make your own lamp.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 9:26:03 PM EDT
I agree, and we normally do have candles in the car in the winter for emergencies but we also do have food!



I updated the first post with Photos and Details from my test done tonight.  I am very pleased with how well this worked.



It worked great and while we never eat tuna in oil normally I think our GHBs in the car are getting switched over to Tuna in Vegetable oil!  The only disadvantage I see is that the only TUNA I see with pull top cans is packed in water but we have can openers in the GHBs so just need to use them if I can't find pull top tuna oil lamps



Enjoy!
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 10:15:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2011 10:16:29 PM EDT by Skibane]
The tuna packed in olive oil is much tastier (and thus is piled high and deep at Casa de Skibane) - However, not sure how well it burns compared to vegetable oil...
Link Posted: 3/6/2011 3:52:26 AM EDT
A mop head haz string.
Link Posted: 3/6/2011 4:19:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Skibane:
The tuna packed in olive oil is much tastier (and thus is piled high and deep at Casa de Skibane) - However, not sure how well it burns compared to vegetable oil...



from wiki:


Fuels used for oil lamps depend on such variables as the location, time period and perhaps the reason for the lamp's use; ceremonial use of lamps for instance may require a particular oil or fragrance to be used. The main fuel in Western nations was olive oil in ancient Mediterranean cultures, though extracts from fish, crude fish oil, nuts, and cheese were also used. In much later times whale oil was favoured for its cleaner burning flame. Oozing crude petroleum was also used. The fuel was poured into the fuel reservoir via the pouring hole in the discus.

Castor oil was used by the ancient Egyptians. In Africa, carrot oil, peanut oil, mustard oil and nettle oil are used. Indian lamps, especially for use in puja, almost exclusively use ghee as fuel.

Among other fuels used have been coal oil and paraffin/kerosene in paraffin lamps (also called kerosene lamps and coal oil lamps). Oil lamps can use many other fuels including jathropa seed oil and biodiesel along with wvo, soybean oil, canola oil, hemp seed oil, sunflower seed oil, and olive oil.


Link Posted: 3/6/2011 4:42:18 AM EDT
This is an interesting thing to know in a McGuyver sort of way, but I wouldn't haul a can of tuna in my GHB just to get 2 hours of candle power out of it, or even for the tuna.  If you want tuna in your GHB the packets are much lighter, and 2 tea light candles will burn for a combined 7 hours.  Damn near no cost and very little weight.
Link Posted: 3/6/2011 5:08:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/6/2011 10:37:03 AM EDT by OverScoped]
Originally Posted By ar-ak:
This is an interesting thing to know in a McGuyver sort of way, but I wouldn't haul a can of tuna in my GHB just to get 2 hours of candle power out of it, or even for the tuna.  If you want tuna in your GHB the packets are much lighter, and 2 tea light candles will burn for a combined 7 hours.  Damn near no cost and very little weight.


that might be true and all, but you  cant make a neat you tube vid out of a votive candle and tuna packets can ya?
Link Posted: 3/6/2011 7:34:10 AM EDT
It has been filed into my bag of knowledge......

I'll show my Scouts.........they will be facinated.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 1:33:15 PM EDT
Tried this over the weekend it worked great

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