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Posted: 7/15/2008 1:05:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/15/2008 1:20:08 PM EDT by Russ79]
-----i work in corrections so to me CERT stands for corrections emergency response team.
it is a elite unit kinda like the police swat teams.

-----my wife has a coworker who after learning about me and
my army tranning, time in iraq and corrections tranning asked
if i would like to join the new mexico cert team or
New Mexico Commuity Emergency Response Team. i know very little
about it, just that it is sponered by the state and FEMA. the unit is
a vol. based thing, so no pay but i would get extra tranning and a
take home bag that i would then take with me to respond to a
major problem in the state. i'm thinking of doing it as it sounds
like fun and would only help my resume should i later make the
move from corrections to police.
-----However i know very little about this unit and was thinking somebody
on the board could give me a 3ed party point of view. somebody
who has delt with them in your state/area of op.

thanks
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 1:52:15 PM EDT
I was on our tactical team for awhile after I got out of the Army, but it was a joke. I was in an Airborne Infantry unit in the Army, so maybe I was expecting too much from a prison tact team. I would make sure I did my homework before I joined.
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 2:03:25 PM EDT
I joined the local Community Emergency Response Team, took the classes, received the free bag of goodies.

They meet a couple times a year, do nothing.

The most I've seen is manning the CERT booth at the local fair.

A few years ago, there was some participation in a greater Training Event but very limited.

Here in NJ, everything revolves around liability.

You can't just let unpaid volunteers do something useful, they'll sue.

So I've become unenthusiastic since they won't let us do anything, practice, train, whatever.

I'm sure in New Mexico, things are much better.
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 2:48:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By downstatetrapper:
I was on our tactical team for awhile after I got out of the Army, but it was a joke. I was in an Airborne Infantry unit in the Army, so maybe I was expecting too much from a prison tact team. I would make sure I did my homework before I joined.


if you read the entire post you would know this is not about the prisons cert team.
not trying to flame/be a jerk, just saying
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 5:59:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 6:21:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Russ79:

Originally Posted By downstatetrapper:
I was on our tactical team for awhile after I got out of the Army, but it was a joke. I was in an Airborne Infantry unit in the Army, so maybe I was expecting too much from a prison tact team. I would make sure I did my homework before I joined.


if you read the entire post you would know this is not about the prisons cert team.
not trying to flame/be a jerk, just saying


Sorry.
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 6:39:16 PM EDT
Get involved if you can. It cannot hurt. Take the boring ass NIMS 300/400 if offered. Get involved with the EMA if you can. I got involved with FD, then EMS, then EMA. Lots of good free training, and you meet the heads of who will "be coming to fix things".

Link Posted: 7/15/2008 7:16:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/15/2008 7:39:39 PM EDT by Kar15]
C.E.R.T. bag of goodies from Emergency Essentials

i think it would be a great idead if you could talk the local PD's into tossing one of these bags(*with a few additions) into the trunks of thier cruisers, the Rescue squads a bag or two into each ambulance, and the Fire Departments a couple bags on each truck, and all other city resources to do so as well. that way individuals whom already possess training would have additional gear allowing them to function in emergency rolls less specific to thier occupation. it would also allow individuals with training(or just even good sumaritans) whom may in the area and have helpful intentions but no equipment or gear to field along with those intentions to join in lending a hand...

* i personally think each kit should also come with:
.several 20oz or so, sized bottles of water
.several emergency "space" blankets
.several additional n95 masks
.several cyalume "glow" sticks, or even better the led electric "funtastic" type glowsticks with the strobing feature and on/off capability
.trauma dressing at minimun, preferabally an ifak or similar type trauma kit
.gas valve shut-off tool
.and maybe even a mil style trifold shovel
(i would personally add to my bag: a small prybar, a bag dedicated multitool, flat wrapped ducttape, 50ft paracord, spare set batteries for headlamp, a couple hand-warmers, and a couple powerbars) being able to hand out a space blanket, bottle of water, dustmask, could easily be a lifesaver possibally even literally, and the hand-warmers and powerbars would be great moral boosters to cold tired and hungry volunteers, not to mention victims...


ETA: i would guess that most of the SF regulars here have more than enough gear in their daily driving BOV's to make these kits look like a joke. i do think though that they would be a handy investment for departments, espicially the smaller locales where they will be depending on a lot of volunteers who may not be personally equiped to help out...

i think if anyone around here offered such a program i'd definatelly get involved, i say go for it man! if it dosen't work out or you don't like it, it's not like you've signed a contract and have to hang with it, if you don't want to. the training you may recieve and contacts you may make could certainly make it worth the time to at least check it out...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 9:39:45 AM EDT
I'm taking the program right now in SoCal. We have completed 1/2 of the program. I would agree that most of the people on this board are well beyond the scope of what they are teaching.

However, with that said, the fire section was a real eye-opener in that I will not EVER go into/near a burning building to save somebody except one of my children. PERIOD! The quantity of odorless colorless gases are what kills. This was very new to me... I always assumed it was the smoke that was the most dangerous. Those N95 and small gas masks won't make a bit of difference, even with filters.

All in all, so far it has been VERY basic, but I was very surprised to see so many (24 full class every time it is offered here) regular / elderly people who are taking an active interest in preparing. One lady had me beat in stored food and another guy had a good stock of ammo. Very surprising to me in this local.

I say take it.... It sure won't hurt. Don't do it for the gear you get.... Cheap flashlight, 3 pairs of latex gloves, 1 pair leather gloves, helmet, etc.... Just cheapo stuff.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 9:43:50 AM EDT
My problem with CERT (and also the Ohio "Military Reserve" [the official govt ran ohio militia]) is that they don't actually ever get activated. And mostly its due to liability and the actual amount of effective man power that they could bring to bear in a situation.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:42:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DenverDuck:
However, with that said, the fire section was a real eye-opener in that I will not EVER go into/near a burning building to save somebody except one of my children. PERIOD! The quantity of odorless colorless gases are what kills. This was very new to me... I always assumed it was the smoke that was the most dangerous. Those N95 and small gas masks won't make a bit of difference, even with filters.


Not to get off topic, but very true. There's all kinds of nasties given off by everything that burns, like phosgene, CO, and lots of others. When we're doing overhaul, we can't take off our masks until the CO levels come down to 35ppm minimum.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 7:36:47 AM EDT
Here in NTX CERT is meeting for class 1/wk, for approx 4hrs, and for a total of 10wks I believe. There will be 'disaster day' in August. DH is having fun with it--he's significantly overprepped compared to most in his class though. But he has learned some stuff, and has enjoyed it.
Link Posted: 8/7/2008 8:34:35 AM EDT
My lower manhattan CERT team has been mobilized several time already. We also work events - Bike NY and charity events that involve people walking or running.
We set up 1st aid stations.

My ham radio group does the same.

Liability is on everyones minds thanks to the lawyers
Link Posted: 8/7/2008 9:45:43 AM EDT
I'm planning on taking the CERT classes and joining here the next round they have. having read these threads before, I'm not expecting a ton of new info, but I'm sure there are some things to learn, or refresh, and a bag of goodies never hurts. The more training I can put on my resume never hurts either.
Link Posted: 8/7/2008 10:11:06 AM EDT
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