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Posted: 7/20/2008 9:05:30 AM EDT
With this heller bit, we are exposed to the DC definition of machinegun as anything that has more than 12 shots, or is a bottom loading firearm, and other sillyness.

While discussing this, one friend stated that in his wisconson hunter safety class, they were told that semi and full were both types of machineguns. Is there some wisconson law similar to this, or was his instructor just wrong
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:04:59 AM EDT
941.27 Machine guns. (1) DEFINITION. In ss. 941.25 and
941.26, “machine gun” means any of the following:
(a) Any weapon that shoots, is designed to shoot or can be
readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without
manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger.
(b) The frame or receiver of any weapon described under par.
(a) or any part designed and intended solely and exclusively, or
combination of parts designed and intended, for use in converting
a weapon into a weapon described under par. (a).
(c) Any combination of parts from which a weapon described
under par. (a) can be assembled if those parts are in the possession
or under the control of a person.

He is wrong and should be corrected. A machine gun is meant for multiple shots to be fired with only one pull of the trigger. A Semi-auto is not a machine gun and it is some of that ignorance, bias, or whatever that clouds what our semiautos really are and makes our ownership even tougher. I'm tired of people/media calling my semi's machine guns for scare purposes.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 12:31:10 PM EDT
akodo


one friend stated that in his wisconson hunter safety class


There's you problem right there.... not exactly the most gun savvy guys in the world that teach these courses...
one notch above a gun store employee... and in some cases.. same notch..
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:38:01 PM EDT
Hey, I help teach those courses.....



That said, there are varying attitudes. Some of my co-instructors are very put out that I hunt with an AR-15.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 3:35:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Harv24:
akodo


one friend stated that in his wisconson hunter safety class


There's you problem right there.... not exactly the most gun savvy guys in the world that teach these courses...
one notch above a gun store employee... and in alot of cases.. same notch..


fixed it for you
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 5:15:06 PM EDT

Hey, I help teach those courses.....


You my friend are the exception.......
Link Posted: 8/21/2008 6:25:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2008 6:26:57 PM EDT by Dave_A]

Originally Posted By akodo:
With this heller bit, we are exposed to the DC definition of machinegun as anything that has more than 12 shots, or is a bottom loading firearm, and other sillyness.

While discussing this, one friend stated that in his wisconson hunter safety class, they were told that semi and full were both types of machineguns. Is there some wisconson law similar to this, or was his instructor just wrong


WI mirrors the NFA on definitions of NFA items...

State law on firearms is pretty much 'Same as Federal'....

Just no CCW and that comical 2-day waiting period for pistols (never bothered me, as I get all my guns off the web, so the transit time counts as the 'waiting' time)....
Link Posted: 8/21/2008 7:24:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dave_A:
that comical 2-day waiting period for pistols (never bothered me, as I get all my guns off the web, so the transit time counts as the 'waiting' time)....

No, it doesn't count.
Link Posted: 8/21/2008 8:24:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vit15:

Originally Posted By Dave_A:
that comical 2-day waiting period for pistols (never bothered me, as I get all my guns off the web, so the transit time counts as the 'waiting' time)....

No, it doesn't count.


Some dealers (ab?)use their ability to call in "custom" guns early.

Mike
Link Posted: 8/21/2008 9:12:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2008 9:12:45 PM EDT by Pita_146]

Originally Posted By Harv24:

Hey, I help teach those courses.....


You my friend are the exception.......


I teach those courses to!

Link Posted: 8/22/2008 7:34:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/22/2008 7:56:18 AM EDT by rfb45colt]
The 48 hr waiting period for handguns begins the minute the dealer gets an "approval" on your background check. The handgun you're buying doesn't necessarily need to be in the dealer's possession at that time. In fact, most small dealers won't even have a gun shipped until after the buyer has been cleared to buy it. Think about it... who pays round trip shipping if the buyer doesn't pass the background check? Or is the dealer "stuck" with a customer's order that the customer cannot take possession of?

As soon as the customer clears the check, the 48 hr clock starts ticking, regardless of where the gun is located... which is likely "in transit" if it's not an "off the shelf" item. I've bought numerous handguns, from several differant dealers, where the gun I wanted wasn't "in stock" and had to be shipped to my dealer from his distributor. It goes like this... the dealer calls his distributor to verify the desired handgun is in stock at the distributor. The distributor gives the dealer the serial number of the gun to be shipped. The customer fills out the required forms, the dealer calls it in to the state DOJ, and when/if the dealer gets a "proceed with sale" response (the 48 hr clock starts at that instant) the dealer then calls his distributor back and instructs them to ship the gun. The gun is in transit during the 48 hr wait.
Link Posted: 8/22/2008 9:00:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 8:12:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pita_146:

Originally Posted By Harv24:

Hey, I help teach those courses.....


You my friend are the exception.......


I teach those courses to!



Me 3
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 7:10:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rfb45colt:
The 48 hr waiting period for handguns begins the minute the dealer gets an "approval" on your background check. The handgun you're buying doesn't necessarily need to be in the dealer's possession at that time. In fact, most small dealers won't even have a gun shipped until after the buyer has been cleared to buy it. Think about it... who pays round trip shipping if the buyer doesn't pass the background check? Or is the dealer "stuck" with a customer's order that the customer cannot take possession of?

As soon as the customer clears the check, the 48 hr clock starts ticking, regardless of where the gun is located... which is likely "in transit" if it's not an "off the shelf" item. I've bought numerous handguns, from several differant dealers, where the gun I wanted wasn't "in stock" and had to be shipped to my dealer from his distributor. It goes like this... the dealer calls his distributor to verify the desired handgun is in stock at the distributor. The distributor gives the dealer the serial number of the gun to be shipped. The customer fills out the required forms, the dealer calls it in to the state DOJ, and when/if the dealer gets a "proceed with sale" response (the 48 hr clock starts at that instant) the dealer then calls his distributor back and instructs them to ship the gun. The gun is in transit during the 48 hr wait.



Waiting time starts ticking when you receive the confirmation # not the approval #. Background checks can only be called in after completion of the sale.l This can be paying in full for your order before it is shipped or paying off a layaway in it's entirety. The bottom line for the State is that the sale has been completed. You do not need the serial # to conduct the check. Dealers can easily manipulate things without getting caught as is usually the case with layaways. The completeion of sale stipulation came about with the advent of the 72hr recheck policy. But that is another story for another thread.
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