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Posted: 9/26/2004 6:33:22 AM EST
I know you guys are busy, but I have a question about the effects of hurricane damage on houses down there. I know the older Florida house are built with mostly 2X4's and I have seen alot of them destroyed by the hurricanes.

I know most of the newer homes' outside walls are made of cinder block construction and have hurricane straps, etc.. How are those homes holding up to the hurricanes???
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 9:08:31 AM EST
most new homes are built under the new wind code which required roofs to be tied down much better, shingles to be nailed not stapled. and hurricane shutters. Most new homes in the area only lost some shingles but nothing compared to the older homes. But there is no building around here that will takle a cat 5 hurricane. I don't care what it is.


J
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 9:40:34 AM EST
For maximum wind resistance, the roof must be tied doen to the top plate, the top plate tied to the wall studs, and the wall studs tied to the foot plate which is bolted to the foundation.

For multi floored structures, strapping must bridge the floor structure such that studs from floor to floor are strapped together.

Homes I saw under construction in the Bahammas had concrete block walls with rebar and ladder wire installed, voids filled with concrete, and the corners were poured in solid concrete, using sheets of plywood as forms. These were very solid, if not small, structures. Cat5 would probably damage or destroy these as well.

Check the steel roof manufacturer's web sights for wind load info. Properly installed, the steel roofs will far surpass shingle roofs in hurricane conditions.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 3:08:27 PM EST
Block house with a "HIP" roof is the best. A HIP roof has no gable ends to catch wind.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:33:31 PM EST
build a bomb bunker and get it over with
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 12:21:45 PM EST
We have a "Post-Andrew" house that is cinderblock with straps and stapled shingles. We suffered no damage through all 3 storms. We have some trees that block the wind to a degree so that may have helped out some. Hope this helps.

-White Horse
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 12:45:28 PM EST
Block house with an 16" poured lental (sp?), not that knock-out block pansey crap. Also with lots of extra rebar rods and double the standard hurricane clips.


This is how my house was built over 22 years ago, and has never suffered any type of damage whatsoever.... not even the Cat 3 Hurricane Elaina in 1985 could hurt it ( and the eye was less than 60 miles or so away from my house for apporx 3 days)


If my house ever goes down, my town would be in seriously bad shape.



Link Posted: 9/27/2004 12:55:45 PM EST
New construction has varied over the years depending on the part of the state. The current code equalizes that a bit. It used to be that almost all the houses in Broward and Dade were concrete block, while almost all of the rest of the state was stick-built. People are starting to smarten up.

There are also lots of ways to make a house more hurricane resistant that go above and beyond the code. Ways of constructing eves that break away, high wind load garage doors so that the wind can't blow in the door and get a toe-hold, etc.

If I were building a new house in Florida I'd try and do it out of aerated concrete walls, and possibly the roof as well.www.curranaac.com/index.html
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 7:16:29 PM EST
Thanks for all the tips!

I have a friend in Oviedo, Fl.. He just had his house built in one of those communities last year and after the four hurricanes, he only lost a couple of roof shingles and a newly planted tree uprooted.

Another friend on Merritt Island,FL, his house was built in 2000, the only damage was the screen around his pool was torn up. Both of the house were built with cinder blocks and hurricane straps, etc..

The house in Oviedo, the second floor is 2X4's, but it held up.

Link Posted: 9/27/2004 7:19:11 PM EST
The building code is in a constant state of flux restrictions are only as good as they are enforeced by city inspectors as we all know they are all the most diligent of workers. Tiebeams are not required to use ply wood any more in construction and particle board is now allowed these are the same mistakes that where made before Hurricane Andrew. The home builders lobby is extremely large in south florida and they are always trying to reduce restrictions to rake in more of a profit on sale of new homes. No current construction of roofs with wood will stand up to a strong Cat 4 or Cat 5 hurricane no matter how many straps it has the only known method is a concrete roof which you will find with more regularity in the florida keys and many caribean islands. Also CBS concrete reinforeced walls should be standard no wood stud or lite steel stud homes should be considered. Also be carefull when buying new homes just because it is new does not mean it well made just like any other product you will buy. Dont assume that the goverment is looking out for you.
Do your research on the construction techniques and reputation of subcontractor that developer is using. This is the bigest investment for most people in there life dont just jump in because your realtor says it is a good deal.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 8:02:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By Macross:
The building code is in a constant state of flux restrictions are only as good as they are enforeced by city inspectors as we all know they are all the most diligent of workers. Tiebeams are not required to use ply wood any more in construction and particle board is now allowed these are the same mistakes that where made before Hurricane Andrew. The home builders lobby is extremely large in south florida and they are always trying to reduce restrictions to rake in more of a profit on sale of new homes. No current construction of roofs with wood will stand up to a strong Cat 4 or Cat 5 hurricane no matter how many straps it has the only known method is a concrete roof which you will find with more regularity in the florida keys and many caribean islands. Also CBS concrete reinforeced walls should be standard no wood stud or lite steel stud homes should be considered. Also be carefull when buying new homes just because it is new does not mean it well made just like any other product you will buy. Dont assume that the goverment is looking out for you.
Do your research on the construction techniques and reputation of subcontractor that developer is using. This is the bigest investment for most people in there life dont just jump in because your realtor says it is a good deal.




I have been researching builders in a few different states for three years and have found some very fucked up builders out there. Now I'am referring to the community builders, not the custom "on your lot" builders, for many reasons, thats not an option for us. Anyhow, there are only three home builders in Florida I would trust, within reason of coarse. Obviously, if mother natures going to destroy your house, it doesn't matter what it's made out of.

ONE of the big mistakes people are making with these new home builders is, they are not getting them inspected, they think it's new, nothing could be wrong with them. I know there are shady home inspectors too. If I end up buying a new home down there, I will be getting two independant home inspections done. Anyway, I could right a book about his, I've researched so much. The purpose of this thread was, I wanted to know if anyone had first hand experience with CBS homes getting torn apart.

Again, thanks for the tips, every bit helps.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 8:25:19 AM EST
I wanted to know if anyone had first hand experience with CBS homes getting torn apart.

90% of homes that are CBS that get fucked up is cuz of the winds catching the roof edges or something massive flying around or a tornado yada yada yada. Like the houses in the keys with poured concrete walls w/ rebar & concrete roofs, that's about the best you can get.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 1:29:38 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 5:16:36 AM EST
I'm in a filled CBS house that was built in 2000. The roof's reinforced with hurricane straps set into the concrete to hold it down in high winds, and our screen enclosure on the back was put on in 2001. We didn't have any damage other than a few roof tiles that were shattered by flying debris, including tiles that were torn from our neighbors' houses.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:44:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By JoeyA:
I wanted to know if anyone had first hand experience with CBS homes getting torn apart.

90% of homes that are CBS that get fucked up is cuz of the winds catching the roof edges or something massive flying around or a tornado yada yada yada. Like the houses in the keys with poured concrete walls w/ rebar & concrete roofs, that's about the best you can get.



Some other construction details for hurricane survival. Low-pitch hip or flat roof with small overhangs. No big trees over house. Shutters. If doors or windows go, not only does the wind-driven water destroy the interior the roof tends to blow off. Although its not used any more, tongue and groove roof sheathing tends to shed water even if shingles and felt membrane are gone. Location; build north and west of Iowa.

Regards,

Mild Bill, Carpenter, 35 years in Florida
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:58:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By Macross:
The building code is in a constant state of flux restrictions are only as good as they are enforeced by city inspectors as we all know they are all the most diligent of workers. Tiebeams are not required to use ply wood any more in construction and particle board is now allowed these are the same mistakes that where made before Hurricane Andrew. The home builders lobby is extremely large in south florida and they are always trying to reduce restrictions to rake in more of a profit on sale of new homes. No current construction of roofs with wood will stand up to a strong Cat 4 or Cat 5 hurricane no matter how many straps it has the only known method is a concrete roof which you will find with more regularity in the florida keys and many caribean islands. Also CBS concrete reinforeced walls should be standard no wood stud or lite steel stud homes should be considered. Also be carefull when buying new homes just because it is new does not mean it well made just like any other product you will buy. Dont assume that the goverment is looking out for you.
Do your research on the construction techniques and reputation of subcontractor that developer is using. This is the bigest investment for most people in there life dont just jump in because your realtor says it is a good deal.



Here in New Smyrna, the hazards were different depending the exact location of the building.
On the Beach it was sand erosion and some wind damage. The wind damage was mainly fences and roofs. Some flood damage in low-lying areas even inland. Where I live it was trees. Trees falling on houses, vehicles and wires.

Regards,

Mild Bill
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 2:54:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By Macross:
The building code is in a constant state of flux restrictions are only as good as they are enforeced by city inspectors as we all know they are all the most diligent of workers. Tiebeams are not required to use ply wood any more in construction and particle board is now allowed these are the same mistakes that where made before Hurricane Andrew. The home builders lobby is extremely large in south florida and they are always trying to reduce restrictions to rake in more of a profit on sale of new homes. No current construction of roofs with wood will stand up to a strong Cat 4 or Cat 5 hurricane no matter how many straps it has the only known method is a concrete roof which you will find with more regularity in the florida keys and many caribean islands. Also CBS concrete reinforeced walls should be standard no wood stud or lite steel stud homes should be considered. Also be carefull when buying new homes just because it is new does not mean it well made just like any other product you will buy. Dont assume that the goverment is looking out for you.
Do your research on the construction techniques and reputation of subcontractor that developer is using. This is the bigest investment for most people in there life dont just jump in because your realtor says it is a good deal.



In addition to the above, buyers seldom know or are willing to pay for quality construction. I guarantee that 99% of them will opt for 100 or so more square feet over better materials and construction methods any day. They think "quality" is nicer carpet or crown moulding and stone countertops...because that is what they can see, use daily and understand. You will get zero credit on your homeowners insurance for higher than code levels of hurricane resistant construction as well. Can anyone here tell me that they ever remember a prospective home buyer asking serious questions about rebar and how it was bent or tied, or framing lumber or if the framing nails were 3 1/2in. round head? I think not.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 4:04:35 AM EST

if the framing nails were 3 1/2in. round head?

Which leads to another question, why nails? I've seen too many houses come apart in storms due to nails pulling loose. They just don't hold. Why aren't screws (like the kind you use on decks) or bolts used? I know they're more expensive, but compared to the ridiculous money some people spend on countertops now, they're cheap.z
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:13:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By zoom:

if the framing nails were 3 1/2in. round head?

Which leads to another question, why nails? I've seen too many houses come apart in storms due to nails pulling loose. They just don't hold. Why aren't screws (like the kind you use on decks) or bolts used? I know they're more expensive, but compared to the ridiculous money some people spend on countertops now, they're cheap.z



The straps work better than any screw could. It's not worth it to spend money on the screws & the labor to put them in.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:23:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By norman74:

Originally Posted By zoom:

if the framing nails were 3 1/2in. round head?

Which leads to another question, why nails? I've seen too many houses come apart in storms due to nails pulling loose. They just don't hold. Why aren't screws (like the kind you use on decks) or bolts used? I know they're more expensive, but compared to the ridiculous money some people spend on countertops now, they're cheap.z



The straps work better than any screw could. It's not worth it to spend money on the screws & the labor to put them in.



Ditto. A nail has more shear resistance and a comparable sized screw has more holding power, so the issue of "coming apart" depends on how the stress is applied. In addition, given much of the framing lumber used these days, I am thankful for Simpson Strong Ties myself!
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:31:37 AM EST
Maybe not the most asthetically pleasing, but by far the best -

http://www.aidomes.com/

guaranteed

I used to live in Florida, had I stayed I was going to build a mid-sized one.
The mobile home I used to own in Gilchrist county is *gone*
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