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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/15/2006 8:16:11 PM EDT
I want to know who saves their brass? What do you do with your brass if you dont reload? Sell it? For how much?

Who reloads? If you reload, how much are you saving from buying ammo, equipment costs aside? Is it worth the time spent reloading?


I have saved bags of .40 and .223 brass over the years. Maybe I thought I would buy reloading equipment one day... Righ now im looking at this useless brass just taking up space. What should I do? Should I invest in reloading equipment? Sell the brass (dont know who to)? Trash it? Keep it?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 8:33:31 PM EDT
Before you trash it, see if your gun club will take it. They probably sell brass and put the money into the club.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:05:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MountedMedic:
I want to know who saves their ass? What do you do with your ass if you dont reload? Sell it? For how much?
Thanks!



You better ask 1GR, "in person". He said something about packing.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:11:45 PM EDT
Oh ya I quit reloading what a waste of my time. For the pennies I might save after many hours at the bench. I can just go to work, make money, and buy double the loaded ammo for the same amount of time. Just my $0.02
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 9:42:16 PM EDT
I save all of my brass, but ai dont reload. I have quite abit of .45brass.
Link Posted: 2/15/2006 11:29:37 PM EDT
with the chinease an russian imports,its impossible to beat the $4.00 a box. i dont have an ar-15 any more so i reload for accurracy. on the days when its pouring down rain , what else do you have better to do with your time? especially since gun shows dont happen ever weekend and not all gun shops handel reasonably priced ammo. i put out enough ammo in 2-3 hours to last me a day out shooting. and if you take 1 rainy day, you can have all your brass ready to go. especially on a dillion.

any one not needing 223 or 45 acp-- donations gladly accepted
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 1:08:37 AM EDT
I only save brass and reload for my hunting and target rifles anymore. You can save money reloading plinking ammo but the time involved is the rub, even with a progressive you still have allot of brass prep to do. If you do decide to reload you may have allot more then just empty brass taking up space.



Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:07:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 8:10:53 AM EDT by Boomer]

Originally Posted By RS_Coyote:
Oh ya I quit reloading what a waste of my time. For the pennies I might save after many hours at the bench. I can just go to work, make money, and buy double the loaded ammo for the same amount of time. Just my $0.02



I tend to agree. Reloading should be seen as either more of a hobby or a way to produce custom ammunition than as a way to save money.

I used to think of the ability to reload as a survival skill, too, but really, instead of keeping stashes of primers, powder, bullets, casings, along with the other necessities of reloading, why not just keep a stash a loaded ammo?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:16:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RS_Coyote:
Oh ya I quit reloading what a waste of my time. For the pennies I might save after many hours at the bench. I can just go to work, make money, and buy double the loaded ammo for the same amount of time. Just my $0.02



I save far more than pennies when I reload. I'm ramping up for 223 now, and even if I don't re-use my brass, it would cost me $160/1000 for 55 grain FMJs. Average prices are now running $200/1000 a the show, so I save $40 per 1000. If I recover my brass, and factor in a "brass life" the price drops to $120/1000, saving me $80 per 1000. How long does it take to reload 1000 rounds? About 1 1/2 hours. So by reloading, I'm effectively paying myself $53 per hour. I don't get paid that much at work.

The 77 grain Mk262 mod 1 load I'm working up costs about $315/1000, whereas retail for it is like $600/1000. Now I'm saving $285/1000 and it still only takes about 1 1/2 to load.

But if you don't enjoy reloading, and just see it as a chore, then it doesn't matter how much money it saves.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:22:59 AM EDT
Hmmmm. Thanks for all the input. I will keep saving brass and when I have a couple thousand rounds, I will look into reloading more. Im sure someone on here would show me the ropes before I buy.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:42:48 AM EDT
I reload about 12K - 15K rounds (45ACP) per year....I end up saving about $2300 annually by reloading that caliber alone. Combine that with 9mm and a bit of .223 and it's probably closer to $2500.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:10:08 PM EDT
Scott, vapors, Me, let be honost, we dont save money by reloading we just have more ammo to show for the money we spent. When I bought my Dillon I didn't save any money, I spent what I usualy spend on components and had a lot more ammo to show. Now I am making blasting/plinking ammo for the .223 for around $78/1000, I wont get powder that cheap again so the next lot will be around $100/1000, that still beats the wolf/bear prices. My coyote rounds cost about $90/1000 to put together, still less that remanned ammo, again the price reflects a killer deal on a bulk buy of powder. It usualy takes around 1 1/2 hours to crank out a 1000 rounds, so on a rainy day I can make quite a few rounds for the sunny days and the not so sunny days. YMMV
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:38:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DDofWA:
Scott, vapors, Me, let be honost, we dont save money by reloading we just have more ammo to show for the money we spent. When I bought my Dillon I didn't save any money, I spent what I usualy spend on components and had a lot more ammo to show.



You are absolutely right.

What powder do you use for 223? I'm trying to go with Ramshot TAC, but can't find it locally for a good deal (1 lb only for $17.50, bah!) Probably going to order 16 lbs of it from Powder Valley. IM me if you want to add on something and we can split the HAZMAT charge to bring the cost down per pound....

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:52:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Scollins:


You are absolutely right.

What powder do you use for 223?




I am using Accurate DP 73(close to 2230 in burn rate), it was a over run production powder and PV was selling it for $52/8lb keg, no longer available.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:25:22 PM EDT
Well since we're being honest...I really would save that much each year...because that's how much ammo I would shoot for competition...and I'm not about to stop that...so yeah....$2300....thats my number...and I'm sticking with it!
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:29:29 PM EDT
My .223s are costing me about $90/1000.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:35:30 PM EDT
Who keeps count. I figure after buying the 550, dies and all the other shit I have I'll be a while breaking even. I will say that handloads turned my Remmy 700 into a tackdriver.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:38:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 8:42:25 PM EDT by FALgal]
oops wrong account.

DD
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:42:34 PM EDT
9mm (mostly because I have a stock of bullets)
357 (brass lasts literally forever and cast lead bullets are $20/500)
41 magnum (brass lasts almost forever and loaded ammuntion is $23 for 50)
44 special (brass lasts almost forever cast lead bullets are $24/500 and loaded ammuntion is $21 for 50)
44 Magnum (brass lasts almost forever cast lead bullets are $24/500 and loaded ammuntion is $17 for 50)
45acp (brass lasts a good while, if I can find it damn fling a matics!)

223 (only for extra accuracy)
308 (Lapua brass goes 10 reloadings in a bolt gun, and for 155gr amaxs)
300wm (for accuracy and fed match is $35/20)
444marlin (brass lasts almost forever and loaded ammuntion is $20/20)

As the cost of 223 goes up it's looking appealing for me to upgrade to a progressive and start loading it in bulk.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:48:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
As the cost of 223 goes up it's looking appealing for me to upgrade to a progressive and start loading it in bulk.



We might as well pool our money together and buy a commercial progressive reloader, something that will crank out a few thousand rounds an hour.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:55:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
As the cost of 223 goes up it's looking appealing for me to upgrade to a progressive and start loading it in bulk.



We might as well pool our money together and buy a commercial progressive reloader, something that will crank out a few thousand rounds an hour.





At last, we come to the unexcelled king of the Dillon line, and any other manufacturer’s line for that matter — The Super 1050 B.
Its features include:

* Automatic Casefeeder
* Automatic Indexing
* Eight-Station Interchangeable Toolhead
* Primer Pocket Swaging Station
* Automatic Powder Measure System
* Automatic Priming System
* Uses Standard 7/8" x 14 Dies
* Loading Rate: 1000+ Rounds per Hour

The Super 1050B’s lengthened frame and new crank assembly have been improved to provide greater strength and smoother operation, especially when advancing the shellplate. In addition, the increased stroke now accommodates rifle calibers while the handle stroke is kept to a minimum, meaning less work for the operator.

It comes complete with a Casefeeder, Roller Handle, and Dies. In fact, the only options to consider are the Powder Check system and the Bullet Tray; the latter replacing the plastic bullet tray standard with the machine. You’ll find the primer pocket swager invaluable, even if only a single piece of military brass sneaks through your machine. In fact, the priming swaging station, in addition to seating the primer on the downstroke, are the two main advantages of the machine over the XL 650.

Assisted only by the new RF 100 Automatic Primer filler, I once loaded 1000 rounds on a 1050 in 33 minutes. And I wasn’t even cranking the handle like a madman - it was just a smooth, consistent run. Of course, I’ve loaded a few bazillion rounds over the years, so that helps. If you want/need to load a garage full of ammo and would rather spend more time on the range than pulling the handle, the 1050 is the machine for you.





Link Posted: 2/16/2006 9:00:03 PM EDT
uncommon rounds become affordable and accuracy is reason enough for me, I shoot the 460Rowland so reloads cost no more than 45 acp, and I have never found a commercial match ammo for the 308 that is as accurate as what I can reload and the cost of the high quality reload match 308 is cheaper than milsurp.

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 10:41:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:

At last, we come to the unexcelled king of the Dillon line, and any other manufacturer’s line for that matter — The Super 1050 B.
Its features include:

* Automatic Casefeeder
* Automatic Indexing
* Eight-Station Interchangeable Toolhead
* Primer Pocket Swaging Station
* Automatic Powder Measure System
* Automatic Priming System
* Uses Standard 7/8" x 14 Dies
* Loading Rate: 1000+ Rounds per Hour

The Super 1050B’s lengthened frame and new crank assembly have been improved to provide greater strength and smoother operation, especially when advancing the shellplate. In addition, the increased stroke now accommodates rifle calibers while the handle stroke is kept to a minimum, meaning less work for the operator.

It comes complete with a Casefeeder, Roller Handle, and Dies. In fact, the only options to consider are the Powder Check system and the Bullet Tray; the latter replacing the plastic bullet tray standard with the machine. You’ll find the primer pocket swager invaluable, even if only a single piece of military brass sneaks through your machine. In fact, the priming swaging station, in addition to seating the primer on the downstroke, are the two main advantages of the machine over the XL 650.





I've got an XL650. I wanted the 1050, but I got a screaming deal on the 650. Now add one of these babies: GSI Automatic BULLET feeder with hopper and all you do is crank the handle and keep things topped off. The inventor is working on the rifle bullet version next.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:34:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
[



At last, we come to the unexcelled king of the Dillon line, and any other manufacturer’s line for that matter — The Super 1050 B.
Its features include:

* Automatic Casefeeder
* Automatic Indexing
* Eight-Station Interchangeable Toolhead
* Primer Pocket Swaging Station
* Automatic Powder Measure System
* Automatic Priming System
* Uses Standard 7/8" x 14 Dies
* Loading Rate: 1000+ Rounds per Hour

The Super 1050B’s lengthened frame and new crank assembly have been improved to provide greater strength and smoother operation, especially when advancing the shellplate. In addition, the increased stroke now accommodates rifle calibers while the handle stroke is kept to a minimum, meaning less work for the operator.

It comes complete with a Casefeeder, Roller Handle, and Dies. In fact, the only options to consider are the Powder Check system and the Bullet Tray; the latter replacing the plastic bullet tray standard with the machine. You’ll find the primer pocket swager invaluable, even if only a single piece of military brass sneaks through your machine. In fact, the priming swaging station, in addition to seating the primer on the downstroke, are the two main advantages of the machine over the XL 650.

Assisted only by the new RF 100 Automatic Primer filler, I once loaded 1000 rounds on a 1050 in 33 minutes. And I wasn’t even cranking the handle like a madman - it was just a smooth, consistent run. Of course, I’ve loaded a few bazillion rounds over the years, so that helps. If you want/need to load a garage full of ammo and would rather spend more time on the range than pulling the handle, the 1050 is the machine for you.








I have the XL650 with case feeder, if you buy the 650 and don't plan on getting the case feeder buy a 550.

The quote above about the 1050, the 1000 rounds in 33 minutes I may tend to call BS, thats a complete cycle every 1.98 seconds, while not imposible, I think improbable. As fare as cycling the machines the 1050 and 650 are not that different, put a bullet on, pull the lever, repeat.

I trim my .223 brass on my 650 with Dillons power trimmer and can regularly crank out800-1000+ and hour, while loading I usualy load in batches of 500, I load primer tubes fill powder measure, turn on case feeder, load 500 rounds, clean up and put the cover on in about an hour. I spend a little time checking the press as its in opperation to catch problems components.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:47:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:45:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OdT:

Originally Posted By STRATIOTES:
I shoot the 460Rowland so .....



I'm curious about that round and gun. Sure wish you'd come to an LCR shoot so I could check it out.... but in the meantime, what's your opinion on it?



I use Montana Gold 180JHP with LongShot powder and get 1800fps out of it, the 180's seem to have more energy than the 230's, the slide springs are 24pounds and will not cycle a standard 45acp but a 22 pound will cycle any good power 230grn 45acp so thats what I did with mine, I cut a coil off the spring and it shoots the hot 460Roland and 45acp out of the same Chip McCormick POWER magazines realibly.

I don't notice much difference in the recoil but my brother who also shoots the 460Rowland slows thw rounds down to 1400fps and they are very conofrtable to shoot recoil-wise.

The higher fps makes the 45 round more accurate, Johnny Rowland gets good groups at 200 yards, i don't shot pistol that much any more so I only get decent x ring hits at 100 yards.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:04:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2006 4:04:37 PM EDT by 2whiskeyP]
I've thrown enough away in the last few years. The trash guy is probably wondering WTF!
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 9:46:23 PM EDT
i realod 223 for $2.40 per 20 round box. thats factoring into it that you are using once fired brass. plus what better to do on a rainy day?
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 10:07:16 PM EDT
through natchez shooters supply or midway, you can get an 8lb keg of 2230-c for cheap
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