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Posted: 8/21/2017 1:22:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/22/2017 6:03:11 AM EST by Bigger_Hammer]
U.T. decided to remove several "controversial" Confederate Statues at Oh-Dark Thirty Sunday Night...

https://www.ksat.com/education/ut-austin-removes-confederate-statues-late-sunday-night

http://www.twcnews.com/tx/austin/news/2017/08/21/university-of-texas-at-austin-removes-confederate-statues-from-south-mall.html


Below is the statement from UT President Gregory Fenves:

Letter from UT President Greg Fenves:

Last week, the horrific displays of hatred at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville shocked and saddened the nation. These events make it clear, now more than ever, that Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism.

After the Charleston, South Carolina, church shooting in June 2015, and with the urging of students, I formed a task force of faculty, students, alumni and university leaders to evaluate six statues on UT's Main Mall that included depictions of four military and political leaders of the Confederacy. The task force presented five options, ranging from the installation of contextual materials to the removal of some or all of the statues. At that time, I decided to move the statues of Jefferson Davis and U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. The Davis statue has since been restored and presented at UT’s Dolph Briscoe Center for American History in a scholarly exhibition about the Littlefield Fountain and the six Main Mall statues.

During the past several days, I have talked with student leaders, students, faculty members, staff members and alumni to listen to their views after the revelatory events in Charlottesville. I also revisited the very thorough 2015 task force report. After considering the original task force report and with the events of the past week and my discussions with the campus community in mind, I have decided to relocate the remaining four statues.

The statues depicting Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston, John Reagan and James Stephen Hogg are now being removed from the Main Mall. The Lee, Johnston and Reagan statues will be added to the collection of the Briscoe Center for scholarly study. The statue of James Hogg, governor of Texas (1891-1895), will be considered for re-installation at another campus site.

The University of Texas at Austin is a public educational and research institution, first and foremost. The historical and cultural significance of the Confederate statues on our campus — and the connections that individuals have with them — are severely compromised by what they symbolize. Erected during the period of Jim Crow laws and segregation, the statues represent the subjugation of African Americans. That remains true today for white supremacists who use them to symbolize hatred and bigotry.

The University of Texas at Austin has a duty to preserve and study history. But our duty also compels us to acknowledge that those parts of our history that run counter to the university’s core values, the values of our state and the enduring values of our nation do not belong on pedestals in the heart of the Forty Acres.

We do not choose our history, but we choose what we honor and celebrate on our campus. As UT students return in the coming week, I look forward to welcoming them here for a new academic year with a recommitment to an open, positive and inclusive learning environment for all.

...

Oy-Vey!!!!
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 3:11:56 AM EST
The replacements


Link Posted: 8/21/2017 7:59:13 AM EST
Might be time to change my username. I really am at the point that I am embarrassed to admit that I graduated from there.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 8:31:22 AM EST
Letter from UT President Greg Fenves:

Last week, the horrific displays of hatred at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville shocked and saddened the nation. These events make it clear, now more than ever, that Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism.
View Quote
Wow.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 8:51:57 AM EST
I've been worried about the Sul Ross statue at A&M. People would get their ass kicked if someone mentioned removing it, it such a beloved figure that is almost the centerpiece of campus.

I'm wondering what the legislature will say about it. One of the guys was governor, like it or not.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 9:18:38 AM EST
Woodrow Wilson the 28th president?
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 11:07:41 AM EST
The email below was what I received in my inbox this morning.

------------

Dear MD Anderson community,
We work at an amazing place. In this ad interim role, I’ve been able to see so much of the work you do every day and witness firsthand the dedication you have to our mission to end cancer.
At The Forum this week, our teams were highly engaged, asking thoughtful and meaningful questions about our plans to keep our institution moving forward and to maintain our momentum. The energy in the room was positive, people were motivated and they wanted to know how they could help.

This has been a consistent theme. Sometimes we’re moving so fast that we don’t think about our culture of caring and how distinct and special it is. This stems not only from the incredible mission that drives us but also from our amazing, collaborative teams that pull together in tough times.

Even during this transition, you have contributed to major achievements. Our reputation as the #1-ranked hospital for cancer care remains strong. This week, our world-class contributions in science have been recognized again through funding from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. And, over the last year, you have made tremendous progress to turn the financial tide. These are just three examples of our many accomplishments resulting from your hard work and dedication.

MD Anderson is strong because of you. Each of us has a unique story to tell. These viewpoints and experiences come together to unify us in our mission to end cancer. Chancellor McRaven recently shared a message with the presidents of each UT institution in light of recent national and international events. Truly moved by his words, I support his goal to ensure an environment for our people and our patients built upon respect, dignity and diversity.

We are grateful to have each and every one of you here, and I am so proud to be a part of your team. Thank you for all you do.

Sincerely,

Marshall E. Hicks, M.D.
President ad interim


Message from UT System Chancellor Bill McRaven to UT System presidents:
Presidents:
In 1977, when I was commissioned as an Ensign, the Navy’s tagline was, “Join the Navy and See the World.” Well, I can tell you that the Navy kept its promise. After 37 years of service, I sailed the seven seas, visited over 90 countries and met with people of every conceivable culture and background. What became clear in my travels was the universality of humanity: not the things that separated us, but things that bound us together.

In every culture I encountered, life above all, was precious. It was the condition necessary for everything else. That may not seem very profound, but to those who struggled to survive on a daily basis, life had a special meaning.

All great cultures placed a premium on respect. Respect for one’s elders. Respect for the laws of the community. Respect for the symbols and the traditions that tied the culture together. But, respect was not a birthright. Even the monarchs and village chieftains had to earn their respect if they hoped for a long rule.

Dignity, however, did not have to be earned. It was granted by society, even to the poor and disenfranchised. The great cultures understood the inequities of life. Some were born fortunate, other not. Dignity allowed every individual an opportunity to rise above their circumstances.

However, not every universal quality I experienced was good. I found that when life was cheap, when respect and dignity were in short supply, when the conventions of society fell apart, even the oldest of cultures resorted to hatred and violence as a means of expressing their frustration and outrage.

As I watched the events of Charlottesville unfold, it heightened my concern that as a nation, we are losing sight of our common humanity, of the bonds that bring us together. Some, who are lost in a world of hatred, bigotry and violence, are focusing on our differences and not our commonalities. Those bent on destruction chose to separate themselves from the well intentioned populous. They separate themselves because they are afraid. They are afraid because they lack the understanding, the empathy and the acceptance that comes from a worldly experience. They haven’t witnessed the simple wisdom of a village elder in Afghanistan. They haven’t seen the dedication of a young Nigerian girl, walking miles to a one room school house. They must not know or appreciate the history of the great Arab mathematicians, the Jewish scientists, the European artists, the African musicians, the Asian merchants, or the literary giants from Latin America.

As educators, we have a special responsibility to our society. There is an expectation that all our schooling has given us great intellect and experience. There is an expectation that our leadership will be strong in challenging times. There is an expectation that we will teach the next generation-- and that the next generation-- will be better than we are. There is an expectation that education will bring progress and progress will bring us closer to a society that lives in harmony, with itself-- and with the world. And, most of all, there is an expectation that, as presidents and chancellors, we will protect those in our care; that we have a sacred obligation to the parents who trusted us with that which they treasure the most.

As the fall semester approaches and the specter of discontent is rising, I want all of you to know my position. First, we will value life and limb over any and all other liberties. The safety of our students, faculty and employees will be paramount. I will work with you in every way possible to ensure you have the legal authority necessary to protect those in your care. On the issue of safety, I will not compromise. The lawyers know where to find me.

We will respect the law, the lawmakers, and keepers of the law. Among our students and faculty, we will encourage lifelong discovery, vigorous debate and peaceful dissent-- for they are the cornerstones of academic freedom and our democracy. We will never shy away from the difficult issues that face our society, but we will not allow our campuses to be safe havens or temporary resting places for those who seek to undermine our responsibility to the public good.

We will endeavor, at all times, to be welcoming, tolerant, understanding, and helpful. We will treat everyone with dignity, unless their behavior compromises the safety of our students or our academic mission. As leaders, we will inspire confidence in the public through our words and actions. Everything we do will be moral, legal and ethical and we will stand by our convictions that universities are a place for learning and growing, not a place for subjugation of decency and the human spirit.

I want to thank each one of you for the incredible job you do every day. It is my honor to serve with you! Very respectfully, Bill
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 2:38:26 PM EST
Yep
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 5:13:48 PM EST
http://www.kbtx.com/content/news/AM-to-review-historical-artifacts-but-Sul-Ross-statue-will-remain-on-campus-441326363.html

Well at least Sharp came out and said it, but he's trying to appease all sides.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 5:43:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By geegee:
Wow.
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Originally Posted By geegee:
Letter from UT President Greg Fenves:

Last week, the horrific displays of hatred at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville shocked and saddened the nation. These events make it clear, now more than ever, that Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism.
Wow.
Well if they are going to knee jerk react to what happened there, then are they also banning Dodge Challengers from anywhere near UT campus's as well? They are obviously the preferred vehicle and weapon of death of neo-Nazis based on that 1 and only incident. Such a joke, they have been looking for an excuse to remove those statues for awhile now, this just gave them a cop out excuse and it shows by them doing it in the middle of the night without telling anyone until after it was already done. If it weren't for the leftists wanting the statues removed in Virginia and other places and the government leaders caving in, there would have never been any white supremecists or neo-nazi's there to begin with. It's not like they have been having KKK meetings at all these statues for all these years.

Even more ridiculous is the left is now upset that the white horse mascot at USC happens to have the same name (spelled differently) as Robert E. Lee's horse. So apparently horses can be racist too! Guess they will have to kill that horse and find a multi colored one, preferable rainbow colored and name it after Obama to make them happy.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 6:19:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2017 6:22:59 PM EST by 98kGuy]
I really have nothing CoC compliant to say.

Except that Greg Fenves is a scumbag of epic proportions...and I hope he dies in a fire.

Also sounds like McCraven has turned into a real turd too....I will have to take down his 10 rules from my son's room, since if they turn you into a PC turd, they are worthless.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 8:35:57 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 98kGuy:
I really have nothing CoC compliant to say.

Except that Greg Fenves is a scumbag of epic proportions...and I hope he dies in a fire.

Also sounds like McCraven has turned into a real turd too....I will have to take down his 10 rules from my son's room, since if they turn you into a PC turd, they are worthless.
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I like you. 
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 10:05:39 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 6:21:46 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ar15eric:
Woodrow Wilson the 28th president?
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Yes, THAT very same Woodrow Wilson...

Who led the USA in World War I (for which the Memorial Fountain was created (see the Soldier & Sailor in Littlefield Fountain)...

He was a Democrat from the South (as they all where then) first Democrat elected (1912) since Zachary Taylor of 1848

who promoted the "League Of Nations" (think U.N.) to prevent future wars...

created the Federal Reserve...

And is the face on the $100,000 Gold Certificate (as the Dollar was Convertible to Gold back then!)

WikiPedia says he didn't think much of blacks because he kept the army units segregated (as they had been in Civil War & would be until after WW II). He didn't denounce the Klan... He as from the South and a Democrat...
Link Posted: 8/26/2017 5:23:55 PM EST
What is funny is Governor Hogs statue was removed because he was a confederate general. Only problem was he was 14 at the time of the civil war. He did not serve, family did not own slaves and he promoted some black help programs.

Now there was a general Hog and he was 65 at the time.

Oh history, who reads or cares?
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