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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 9/30/2007 12:16:34 PM EST
Been living in ABQ since December last year and didn't see a single rattler until this month and now I have seen three of them in a three week span; two within a couple days. One was about a four footer, the other two about two feet. Two of them ended up being killed, the last one I stepped over while running in the open space near Paseo Del Norte on the westside of town, luckily I wasn't bitten.

When you go hiking to you carry a venom kit, snake chaps, or just look and listen? I haven't had a problem until recently, so maybe it is just chance. At any rate, I am taking care and trying not to get bit.

Oh yeah, after living in NC for almost seven years, I am still amazed at how great the weather is out here.
Link Posted: 9/30/2007 1:16:20 PM EST
I use snake chaps in rattlesnake weather. They're also good at keeping mesquite thorns at bay. Downside...they're hot.
Link Posted: 10/1/2007 6:57:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2007 6:59:53 AM EST by Erich]
I walk around all the time in snake country and have never been bitten. They really like to avoid people. I suppose it helps to pay attention to where you're putting your feet. Wearing boots is not a bad idea. But . . . chaps? Seems silly to me here in ABQ. Might make sense in TX or Roswell where they've got more snake action, but we're just too dry around ABQ to have too many snakes.
Link Posted: 10/1/2007 12:06:05 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/1/2007 3:02:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By Erich:
I walk around all the time in snake country and have never been bitten. They really like to avoid people. I suppose it helps to pay attention to where you're putting your feet. Wearing boots is not a bad idea. But . . . chaps? Seems silly to me here in ABQ. Might make sense in TX or Roswell where they've got more snake action, but we're just too dry around ABQ to have too many snakes.


silly until you get bit, Erich. I don't think you can ever be too careful. I've grown up outdoors, and know what I'm looking for. but have had several encounters with rattlers that were too close for comfort.
Link Posted: 10/3/2007 9:16:36 AM EST
Back home in Indiana we had rattlers (big, not like the massasaguas we see so many of up here by ABQ - tho we do occasionally get a diamondback), copperheads (like a diamondback w/o the rattles), and water moccasins (scary). While I nearly stepped on rattlers and copperheads in the woods, keeping alert was a big help. Cottonmouths scared the heck out of me, and were actively aggressive.

Up in this part of the state, it would be most unusual to get bitten - and I hike a fair amount. I know things can happen, but after a cost-benefit analysis of wearing hot, stupid-looking chaps, I'm willing to take a pass. After all, I'm infinitely more likely to get bitten by a dog, and I don't wear kevlar "dog-bite chaps."

As I said, though, we're in different areas and probably doing different things. If I were working oilfields down on the East Plains, I might have a different take on it.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:32:18 PM EST
I just did a couple of service calls in Silver City and Deming this week. The drive from SC really made my skin crawl, as I spotted at least 100 snakes on the road during that 65 mile drive. I know some of them were corn snakes, but quite a few of them were definately rattlers.

Any precaution you take to keep from being bit is worth its weight in gold. Back in the '70s, my cousin was bitten by a southern prairie rattler. It still has lasting effects on him to this day.
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