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Posted: 9/5/2010 3:01:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 3:23:48 PM EDT
They'll have you go in and out of cones, 90 degree turns, do a circle and stopping, I think also a quick divert around an object. If you go through a riding safety course then all you
have to do is take that certificate to DMV and they give you a license and also get discount on insurance with the course.

Link Posted: 9/5/2010 4:28:58 PM EDT
What he said. I'd highly suggest the safety course. I did the DMV route, in hind site I'd rather have the insurance discount too. Will be doing a class at CSN myself before too long.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 4:38:33 PM EDT
It has been a long while since I took the riding test but it pretty much mirrored the Motorcycle Safety Course. I doubt I could have passed the test if I hadn't taken the Motorcycle Safety Course. It is well worth your time and money to take the course as they teach you the physics of how a bike operates. Two wheels operate way different then 4 wheels.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 4:51:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 4:55:41 PM EDT by fixer]
i suggest going down and watching some people take it... but you're a ways out so that's not the easiest thing for you.

weave around the cones or dots, make a U turn between two lines... gotta keep the tires in about a 2' track and the one part i found akward was where they have you accelerate, then slam on the front brake and they want you to make the front tire skid. my bike had soft, weak brakes when i took the test and i rarely try to make the front skid intentionally... so it was going against all my normal riding instincts. had i been on the bike i'd had before the one i took the test on with firmer suspension and stronger brakes it would not have been a problem.

i don't think they want you doing endos either.

the regs say that you're supposed to show up with another licensed rider, but they never asked check on that or to check that the bike was insured. you could trailer the bike or haul it in a truck and work around that i guess, but they never checked.

if you have any problems understanding the tester, turn the bike off, remove your helmet and ask them to repeat the instructions. i had a tester with an attitude and an accent.

a small to mid sized dual sport will be a breeze to take the test on... with the possible exception of the skid the front part.

look at the pavement and that seems to be where they guys on new full dress harleys or Gold Wings dump the bike. lots of deep gouges in the pavement.

make sure the bike idles without needing to be revved up. make sure it's warmed up and that you remember to shut the choke off. if the bike dies and you have o put a foot down they'll either make you re do that section or wash you out and make you come back.

Link Posted: 9/5/2010 5:56:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 5:57:08 PM EDT by Wolfpack]
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:32:24 PM EDT
I don't remember it being 2.5 days but I haven't taken it since 1989.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:24:11 PM EDT
How much would a course set ya back for?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:28:06 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 11:12:28 PM EDT
IIRC, the MSF course has a waiting list of several months... seems like there's a bunch of people intimidated by the DMV test.

the strange part is that i've tried several times to take the instructors' course and the state never calls or emails to notify me. they only offer the course once a year in Vegas which is a week long course, and once a year in Carson, which is three weekends. need to follow up on that AGAIN this spring.

a few years ago my GF at the time took the course thru CCSN. registered four months in advance, bought her a helmet, gloves and boots (normal boots, not motorcycle boots) and then the fell the first day and messed up her ankle. she missed a bunch of the course after her injury the first day and missed the next day.

the course at LV HD has a shorter wait, but it's MUCH more expensive.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:53:34 AM EDT
One of the guys i work with just took the class last week.
He registered three weeks before the class started. He said there was no wait involved. He picked a time to match his vacation.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:08:29 AM EDT
ccn offers a class but you gotta get in early.

take it on the smallest street legal bike you can get your hands on. if your on anything of size and haven't been riding long.........your gonna fail. i've been riding motorcycles since i was a kid and that sumbitch is hard! i did mine in another state but i watched it one day and they are NOT nice.

take the class!
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 4:53:37 PM EDT
The MSF course is worth it's weight in gold. You'll learn suvival skills that will help you avoid the idiots and prepare you to react in the correct fashion. It will improve your car driving skills. I don't see how anyone stays alive without going through this, but if you go through it, you'll see for yourself.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:08:44 PM EDT
I took the DMV's test twice and failed both times...
And that was after riding with a few very seasoned riders and practicing with them. And they even said I was a natural and would do great.
Didn't help taking it with my big ass ST1100.

So, when I get another bike in the future, I will be taking the safety course at a college.
And if I were to take the DMV's again, I'd get the smallest bike possible just for the test.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:10:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By f2:
The MSF course is worth it's weight in gold. You'll learn suvival skills that will help you avoid the idiots and prepare you to react in the correct fashion. It will improve your car driving skills. I don't see how anyone stays alive without going through this, but if you go through it, you'll see for yourself.


Without even taking the course, riding a motorcycle made me a much better car driver!
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:05:47 PM EDT
You folks keep saying take the test on the smallest bike possible but what is the point of getting your ML if you can't pass the test on the bike you plan on riding regularly?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:35:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
You folks keep saying take the test on the smallest bike possible but what is the point of getting your ML if you can't pass the test on the bike you plan on riding regularly?


Yep.

Just like the same people that qualify with a .22 LR Revolver (just to get the revolver sign-off), and then carry a S&W500. I don't allow it if I know about it.

Start the flaming.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:28:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 10:28:52 PM EDT by f2]
Yes, the course should be taken with the bike you'll be riding. Took mine with my then new 1980 Honda Hawk CB400T - 6 speed. edit... you never forget how to counter steer...
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:19:35 AM EDT
well.... a stretched chopper with no front brake probably can't physically pass the test. but i wouldn't recommend a bike like that to anyone, especially a new rider.

likewise, i don't think a new rider should be on some huge bike.

better to learn on something of modest size, power and price instead of beating up a brand new bike that's not yet paid for.

i'm not one to suggest doing it on the smallest possible, but i would suggest carefully choosing your first moto and not bite off more than they can chew.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 11:17:57 AM EDT
When I bought my ST1100 I needed transportation and was interested in a bike. It was a '91 in good shape, and I got it for $700. So, while a bike a little smaller may have been better for me, the price was unbeatable.
As for the DMV's course, there are some obstacles in there that I really doubt you'd come across in real life. Maybe they're more common than I'd think, but that's just my belief.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 11:23:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ishoot2live:
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
You folks keep saying take the test on the smallest bike possible but what is the point of getting your ML if you can't pass the test on the bike you plan on riding regularly?


Yep.

Just like the same people that qualify with a .22 LR Revolver (just to get the revolver sign-off), and then carry a S&W500. I don't allow it if I know about it.

Start the flaming.


At the time my wife and I took our CCW class, I had the option of a Colt Anaconda, a pair of Ruger Super Blackhawks, or a .22 Ivor Johnson. I brought the .22 to class.
Since then, I've purchased a Ruger LCR, which we both practice with regularly, and she keeps on her.

CCWing a S&W 500 is just stupid.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 2:29:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 2:30:20 PM EDT by ALASKANFIRE]
Another fan of the MSF courses. I have taken both the beginner and advanced a long time ago

Originally Posted By MooseForce:
Originally Posted By ishoot2live:
Originally Posted By DamascusKnifemaker:
You folks keep saying take the test on the smallest bike possible but what is the point of getting your ML if you can't pass the test on the bike you plan on riding regularly?


Yep.

Just like the same people that qualify with a .22 LR Revolver (just to get the revolver sign-off), and then carry a S&W500. I don't allow it if I know about it.

Start the flaming.


At the time my wife and I took our CCW class, I had the option of a Colt Anaconda, a pair of Ruger Super Blackhawks, or a .22 Ivor Johnson. I brought the .22 to class.
Since then, I've purchased a Ruger LCR, which we both practice with regularly, and she keeps on her.

CCWing a S&W 500 is just stupid.


Having to pay the state and a instructor to carry a gun should be a crime
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 2:42:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fixer:
well.... a stretched chopper with no front brake probably can't physically pass the test. but i wouldn't recommend a bike like that to anyone, especially a new rider.

likewise, i don't think a new rider should be on some huge bike.

better to learn on something of modest size, power and price instead of beating up a brand new bike that's not yet paid for.

i'm not one to suggest doing it on the smallest possible, but i would suggest carefully choosing your first moto and not bite off more than they can chew.



I did my course and test on my Harley with a slight rake front end and Apes, it was not easy but passed (but then I have been riding since 78). Had to have extra witnesses
to watch because they kept thinking I was hitting the cones when in fact it was the straight pipes blowing them away. I agree with you on the fact they should not buy a bike
they can't handle.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 3:47:03 PM EDT
A friend of mine took the class at CSN and used their bikes. He said it was easier and all he needed was a DOT helmet,boots and long pants.

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:29:05 PM EDT
No glove requirement?
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:50:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By hdflht2000:
I did my course and test on my Harley with a slight rake front end and Apes, it was not easy but passed (but then I have been riding since 78). Had to have extra witnesses to watch because they kept thinking I was hitting the cones when in fact it was the straight pipes blowing them away. I agree with you on the fact they should not buy a bike they can't handle.


i was thinking more of the severely stretched choppers that don't even have a front brake. since the test requires you to lock up the front and make it skid... something like that simply couldn't pass that portion of the test.

i've got a pic of me at the antique MC auction a few years ago on a supercharged Triumph by Von Dutch. was a Bonneville bike at one point i guess. the rear pegs, shifter and rear brake pedal were back by the rear hub. there was no front brake and the bars were down at the lower triple clamp. very cool bike, but not what i'd want to take the test on.

unfortunately, there's plenty of riders of all ages that buy a bike based on what looks cool and the financing they can qualify for. and that's the bike they learn on. unfortunately some don't survive that rite of passage.

in some other countries, MC riders are restricted to smaller bikes for the first few years. if we had tiered licensing here i think we'd have fewer new riders wrecking their bikes. buuuur i'm NOT an advocate for MORE government. we have too much bureaucracy as it is.



Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:08:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fixer:
Originally Posted By hdflht2000:
I did my course and test on my Harley with a slight rake front end and Apes, it was not easy but passed (but then I have been riding since 78). Had to have extra witnesses to watch because they kept thinking I was hitting the cones when in fact it was the straight pipes blowing them away. I agree with you on the fact they should not buy a bike they can't handle.


i was thinking more of the severely stretched choppers that don't even have a front brake. since the test requires you to lock up the front and make it skid... something like that simply couldn't pass that portion of the test.

i've got a pic of me at the antique MC auction a few years ago on a supercharged Triumph by Von Dutch. was a Bonneville bike at one point i guess. the rear pegs, shifter and rear brake pedal were back by the rear hub. there was no front brake and the bars were down at the lower triple clamp. very cool bike, but not what i'd want to take the test on.

unfortunately, there's plenty of riders of all ages that buy a bike based on what looks cool and the financing they can qualify for. and that's the bike they learn on. unfortunately some don't survive that rite of passage.

in some other countries, MC riders are restricted to smaller bikes for the first few years. if we had tiered licensing here i think we'd have fewer new riders wrecking their bikes. buuuur i'm NOT an advocate for MORE government. we have too much bureaucracy as it is.





In this care (riding test) I agree with the smaller (don't have to be too small) the better. I would recommend the safety course over DMV becuase they will have you do things you normally would not do yourself. Even after 18 years of riding I went through the course and it was well worth it.

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 11:15:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Wolfpack:
Originally Posted By Esq1118:
How much would a course set ya back for?


Basic course...$250

http://www.cycleschool.com/


i went to cycle school earlier this year b/c their class only consist of 8 students max
the basic class will start at very basic levels, including how to get on/off bike ;)
if you have been on a bike, then you can do the experienced class.
both classes will include certificate to skip riding test at dmv
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