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Posted: 7/19/2013 10:57:33 AM EST
Just wanted to let you guys know that I have recently spent some money on a local beekeeper, and his product is excellent. I believe most store bought honey probably comes from China, and the list of reasons for going local is long and distinguished.

PM me if you want his contact info.

And before I forget, this thread, like all good threads should be, is actually firearm related.










Link Posted: 7/19/2013 11:02:19 AM EST
I buy all my honey from local guys. send me the guys info. I'll post the label of the stuff I have at home right now, honestly its the best local honey I've ever had.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 11:37:05 AM EST
what, you forget what facebook is fer??
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 12:04:35 PM EST
For southern tier guys, I highly recommend Tremblay Apiaries based in Spencer. Top quality.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 12:30:04 PM EST
This was from an email...


We have two nice 2013 Spring honeys harvested for sale. The first variety is Black Locust, and the other is a blend of Basswood, Sumac and Black Locust (but the bees did the blending on this one.)

Both varieties are for sale for $5 / half-pint jar; $9 per pint, $17 per quart, and $33 for a half-gallon. This equates to around $6 per Lb in the half-pint size, slipping closer to $5 per pound in the half gallon size. All honey is 100% raw and local; never touched by heat and only lightly strained to remove large impurities.

We will be selling at the Pulaski Farmers Market this Friday night from 4-8 PM, and hope to set up a stand at Crossroads Park in Central Square next week - which days we are not certain of just yet.. I can also meet up with you most evenings in West Monroe at Two Guys Pizza or the Mobil across from that.

Let me know what you're interested in, and i can set some aside for you. I will also have chunk and comb honey for sale in the coming couple of weeks.

Thank you,

Jacob the Beekeeper
315-877-8945
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 12:45:18 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 41magluva:
This was from an email...


We have two nice 2013 Spring honeys harvested for sale. The first variety is Black Locust, and the other is a blend of Basswood, Sumac and Black Locust (but the bees did the blending on this one.)

Both varieties are for sale for $5 / half-pint jar; $9 per pint, $17 per quart, and $33 for a half-gallon. This equates to around $6 per Lb in the half-pint size, slipping closer to $5 per pound in the half gallon size. All honey is 100% raw and local; never touched by heat and only lightly strained to remove large impurities.

We will be selling at the Pulaski Farmers Market this Friday night from 4-8 PM, and hope to set up a stand at Crossroads Park in Central Square next week - which days we are not certain of just yet.. I can also meet up with you most evenings in West Monroe at Two Guys Pizza or the Mobil across from that.

Let me know what you're interested in, and i can set some aside for you. I will also have chunk and comb honey for sale in the coming couple of weeks.

Thank you,

Jacob the Beekeeper
315-877-8945
View Quote


Prices are a little steep, but not uncommon for smaller shops. I sometimes buy from a local older lady for about the same prices. Her's is unpasteurized and varies wildly in flavors. I've had some that were very nice and some that were strange(like dandelion or something with a little bitterness). I've also had one batch go bad and ferment.

I usually buy from Doan's Honey Farm... But they were on with Bob Lonsberry not long ago and may be going under do to all the bee deaths. They also travel to FL for orange blossom, tupelo and saw palmetto honey. Their buckwheat is pretty strong and the wildflower is good. It is pasteurized, but it lasts a lot longer before going full crystalline. They also sell by the gallon, but you have to bring your own jug to the farm. And it used to bring the cost below $5 per pound. But who knows with the trouble they are having with the hives.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 4:18:15 PM EST
Local honey and local maple syrup. Ive actually helped make the syrup.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 4:19:27 PM EST
This is NY. Local maple syrup is a given.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 4:35:06 PM EST
the two jars I have right now are

Wixson's honey Clover
dundee, NY 14837

$4.75 for a decent sized jar

the other which I think is awesome (both are really good though)

Linck Apiaries, Inc.
3850 Slate Hill Rd
Marcellus, NY 13108

$5 for a slightly smaller jar
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 10:50:10 PM EST
I don't use honey that much, so this is a serious question: Is there a discernible difference in taste between store-bought honey and fresh (?) honey?

When I was younger, I do remember using honey to dip chicken nuggets into.

Link Posted: 7/20/2013 1:28:36 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NY_Shooter:
I don't use honey that much, so this is a serious question: Is there a discernible difference in taste between store-bought honey and fresh (?) honey?

When I was younger, I do remember using honey to dip chicken nuggets into.

View Quote


The difference is incredible. Store honey is very generic stuff, blended for consistency and usually pasteurized to protect their ass.

Local honey is rarely pasteurized, so yes, there is a VERY slight risk of catching something... but honey is not a good carrier for germs, so not a big risk. Beyond that, the FLAVOR is incredibly different. Most local places will sort and jar their honey based on what's in season, and each has a different color and flavor. Buckwheat and black locust are two of my favorites, but they are very dark and almost smoky; great on rich homemade bread or for baking but too strong for a light tea and the like.

Wixsons (mentioned above) does small jars as well, and the quality is great; I'd strongly suggest buying some of each and trying them!
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 6:08:33 AM EST
We just set up a hive this spring in our yard. Due to the cold spring we won't have honey this yer. But next year....
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 12:25:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zercool:


The difference is incredible. Store honey is very generic stuff, blended for consistency and usually pasteurized to protect their ass.

Local honey is rarely pasteurized, so yes, there is a VERY slight risk of catching something... but honey is not a good carrier for germs, so not a big risk. Beyond that, the FLAVOR is incredibly different. Most local places will sort and jar their honey based on what's in season, and each has a different color and flavor. Buckwheat and black locust are two of my favorites, but they are very dark and almost smoky; great on rich homemade bread or for baking but too strong for a light tea and the like.

Wixsons (mentioned above) does small jars as well, and the quality is great; I'd strongly suggest buying some of each and trying them!
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zercool:
Originally Posted By NY_Shooter:
I don't use honey that much, so this is a serious question: Is there a discernible difference in taste between store-bought honey and fresh (?) honey?

When I was younger, I do remember using honey to dip chicken nuggets into.



The difference is incredible. Store honey is very generic stuff, blended for consistency and usually pasteurized to protect their ass.

Local honey is rarely pasteurized, so yes, there is a VERY slight risk of catching something... but honey is not a good carrier for germs, so not a big risk. Beyond that, the FLAVOR is incredibly different. Most local places will sort and jar their honey based on what's in season, and each has a different color and flavor. Buckwheat and black locust are two of my favorites, but they are very dark and almost smoky; great on rich homemade bread or for baking but too strong for a light tea and the like.

Wixsons (mentioned above) does small jars as well, and the quality is great; I'd strongly suggest buying some of each and trying them!


I'm sold. Now I gotta try some.

Link Posted: 7/20/2013 5:34:47 PM EST
i have a friend who's father and brother just got 20 or so hives and i can't wait to try some. they say it's best to eat local honey vs store bought, because the processed stuff has all the good killed in pasteurizing. plus most of the store bought isn't 100% honey.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 5:56:20 PM EST
SWEET!

Nothin' like local honey.

I let a buddy put 8 hives in my unsprayed, completely neglected back field, so I get a few gallons gratis every year.

spring honey here is locust/raspberry mix.

fall is mostly goldenrod.

It all makes for great mead.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:41:02 PM EST
I get local honey from the chain supermarket. Don Sausser, a Southampton, Long Island beekeeper, sells his honey as Don Sausser's East End Apiary. In the stores, I've seen Clover and Wildflower as well as raw, completely unprocessed/unfiltered honey. During the warmer seasons, his products are sold from local farm stands and supposedly he also offers a Black Locust honey or at least he used to, though I've never seen any.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 1:31:15 AM EST
We get all of ours from the Cornell orchards or a local guy at the farmers market
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