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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 7/20/2008 7:15:21 PM EST
I keep talking to my wife about how cool it would be to offer my own firearms training class. Not that I'm some sort of amazing marksman myself, but I really really really love teaching people how to shoot. I think there are a lot of people who don't want to do the whole super formalized, pay $500, spend a weekend doing drills. I think there are people who know they don't know enough, if that makes sense, but are intimidated by those types of classes. Most don't even know about those classes unless they are already "gun people". Even though there are beginners classes they are still too expensive. Granted, if someone looks hard enough and reads up enough on there own, and they have places like arfcom to go to, they'll figure out most of it in time. What I'm talking about is the people who don't consider them selves "gun people" or maybe they want to be but they are intimidated by those who are.

I'm not ex-military or ex-police. I admit I don't know everything. I've never shot at anybody (except 1shepherd). Maybe all of that is a good thing for the people I'm trying to attract.

So do you think there is actually a market for this?

I could offer it through continuing education programs at the local community college. Or post fliers and do training on demand. My wife tells me I should come up with a basic syllabus that I could use.

I just really think that most people can be good with minimal time invested in training. Once they have the basics down and continue with dry drills I think they will be on the learning curve much quicker. I basically think that you cram as much knowledge in front of them as they can comprehend in the time allotted and let them run on their own and let them recognize and catch their own mistakes.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:09:24 PM EST
Well, you'll probably want to have some kind of 'resume' if you're going to 'sell' training. NRA Pistol Instructor as a bare minimum.

I think most people would be looking for an instructor with military, LEO, or a long competition career behind them. Cause, without that background, what exactly are you going to teach them that they haven't already learned themselves, read about, had a friend show, etc? (From their viewpoint) How is your training going to compete with Mr Former Army Designated Marksman or Mr 30 year LEO Firearms Instructor?
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:38:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By ARinKCMO:
I think most people would be looking for an instructor with military, LEO, or a long competition career behind them. Cause, without that background, what exactly are you going to teach them that they haven't already learned themselves, read about, had a friend show, etc? (From their viewpoint) How is your training going to compete with Mr Former Army Designated Marksman or Mr 30 year LEO Firearms Instructor?


I agree...for the most part. I guess what I'm asking is do you think there are enough people who are intimidated by LEO, military training but don't know where to start? I think that there are people, who have guns but have never really though about how to smartly operate and keep them. They want to get better, but they really don't want to invest the time and money or spend lots of weekends at the range. I think most things can be taught & reinforced dry with little range time. More classroom "lets think about this" than go out and drive. The best analogy I can come up with is, you cant take a person who just bought a formula 1 car and stick them on the track. They have to know a ton about how they work, what happens when..., why do you see some people do..., kinda stuff.

I could be wrong. Maybe there isnt a market for this. I'm just clarifying so you guys can tell me if I'm crazy or not.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:39:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By ARinKCMO:
Well, you'll probably want to have some kind of 'resume' if you're going to 'sell' training. NRA Pistol Instructor as a bare minimum.

I think most people would be looking for an instructor with military, LEO, or a long competition career behind them. Cause, without that background, what exactly are you going to teach them that they haven't already learned themselves, read about, had a friend show, etc? (From their viewpoint) How is your training going to compete with Mr Former Army Designated Marksman or Mr 30 year LEO Firearms Instructor?


I agree with this completely. I have a dream of teaching marksmanship when I retire from the Army. I have spent the last 10 years competing and taking classes myself. All of these things help "pad" the resume later. If you were to try this, your best bet is going to be word of mouth. Teach some college chicks or a church group and then let them pass the word. A lot of beginners may not care about an extensive shooting background. I would suggest NRA basic pistol instructor course for you as a minimum.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 8:53:51 AM EST
Generally beginners do not know what they do not know... that is where you would come in. BASIC BASIC BASIC!!!
But you would still probably want an NRA cert for starters as it can sure help you with insurance (And you DO need insurance!!!)

Business cards are a great way to help your word of mouth, Like ABN says, word of mouth is your tool here. and remember you are teaching BASICS only!

Take courses as you can, many insturctors offer instructor courses as well but usually you have to go through a lot of their courses to get to that level. Build your experience.

Generally you can't just wake up one day and decide to be a firearms instructor. No one knows you so you don't get to charge the fees everyone else does, you have to beg borrow and steal range time etc... Keep these things in mind.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:05:17 PM EST
Ok, going to hit a few of the good suggestions given so far and try to add a few.

NRA instructor course.
Insurance
Business cards.
over view of course contents
going to need some loaner guns.
Going to need some loaner muffs, or foam plugs. Later would be my suggestion.
Printed material, booklet to hand out.
Place that you can rent to give hands on part of class. You do not want non-class shooters around while giving the hands on.
Be careful of instructor to clients. Remember these are beginners. Dont want them shooting you, themselfs or other class mates.
Lots of class room time spent not only on workings of revolvers, and autos. But safety and shooting etiquette like muzzle control, finger out of trigger guard till ready to shoot.

Sorry if some of this you have already thought of. Just some random thoughts I thought I would throw out there.

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:22:49 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Matthew10_28:
I keep talking to my wife about how cool it would be to offer my own firearms training class. Not that I'm some sort of amazing marksman myself, but I really really really love teaching people how to shoot. I think there are a lot of people who don't want to do the whole super formalized, pay $500, spend a weekend doing drills. I think there are people who know they don't know enough, if that makes sense, but are intimidated by those types of classes. Most don't even know about those classes unless they are already "gun people". Even though there are beginners classes they are still too expensive. Granted, if someone looks hard enough and reads up enough on there own, and they have places like arfcom to go to, they'll figure out most of it in time. What I'm talking about is the people who don't consider them selves "gun people" or maybe they want to be but they are intimidated by those who are.


It takes a lot to get a professional school up and running. If you need some input feel free to contact me.

BTW- We offer those basic classes in both group and private classes and the cost is only $100 for an hour day. We keep the round count low (150-300rds) but the quality high. We also offer the Firearms Instructor Course.

Christopher Moore

Point Blank
P.O. Box 31
Jackson, MO 63755
573-243-GUNS
www.pointblanktraining.net
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:46:24 PM EST
Sounds interesting, but what could you offer that the Missouri Conservation Department (which has free basic courses) doesn't offer.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:52:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By onemeanmarine:

Originally Posted By Matthew10_28:
I keep talking to my wife about how cool it would be to offer my own firearms training class. Not that I'm some sort of amazing marksman myself, but I really really really love teaching people how to shoot. I think there are a lot of people who don't want to do the whole super formalized, pay $500, spend a weekend doing drills. I think there are people who know they don't know enough, if that makes sense, but are intimidated by those types of classes. Most don't even know about those classes unless they are already "gun people". Even though there are beginners classes they are still too expensive. Granted, if someone looks hard enough and reads up enough on there own, and they have places like arfcom to go to, they'll figure out most of it in time. What I'm talking about is the people who don't consider them selves "gun people" or maybe they want to be but they are intimidated by those who are.


It takes a lot to get a professional school up and running. If you need some input feel free to contact me.

BTW- We offer those basic classes in both group and private classes and the cost is only $100 for an hour day. We keep the round count low (150-300rds) but the quality high. We also offer the Firearms Instructor Course.

Christopher Moore

Point Blank
P.O. Box 31
Jackson, MO 63755
573-243-GUNS
www.pointblanktraining.net


I sent you an email today about taking your pistol classes.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:59:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By Woodman_in_MO:
Sounds interesting, but what could you offer that the Missouri Conservation Department (which has free basic courses) doesn't offer.


So I would have to say, what does the Conservation department course offer?
I would wager than a for pay class would or should offer a bit more than the conservation department.

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:27:23 PM EST
The last Conservation class I attended had some so-so info in it. It's just useful for getting your heritage card so you can go hunting. I guess it's also good if you have no 'mentor' to teach you proper gun handling, which is not even really covered besides the '10 commandments' of gun safety. No better training than hands-on, if you ask me.
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