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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/21/2005 7:39:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 7:39:33 PM EDT by thebeekeeper1]
Okay folks, I’ve got a couple of Cat III hurricanes under my belt and have learned a couple of things along the way. I’d like to go ahead and take a minute or two and jot down some things that you might find helpful.



1. To be flee or not to be flee, that is the question:

This is always the million dollar question that a person has to ask themselves. Undoubtedly, you will run into folks who will say “I was here during Hurricane Norman and we were just fine.” Many of the folks in Mississippi did not leave in the face of Katrina (Cat IV) because their homes had survived Hurricane Camille (Cat V). Some of those people are dead right now. My personal view is that I leave town for anything Cat III or larger. My neighbor didn’t and was just fine. However, my wife teaches Kindergarten and in her class is a little boy who doesn’t have a sister anymore because a falling limb came through her room and crushed her while she was sleeping. Ultimately, of course, it’s your choice. If you decide to leave, make your hotel reservations now before they all fill up. If the hurricane veers off and takes a different course, simply cancel your reservations. Most hotels have a 24 hour / no charge cancellation policy. You will know much sooner if the hurricane is still headed your direction.



2. Types of hurricane damage:

2a. Water Damage:

First of all, the ones who are most at risk are those residents near the coast line. The majority of the damage sustained by hurricanes is in the storm surge. Generally, the bigger the storm, the higher the storm surge that will be pushed up onto and over the shore. A moving wall of water will win every time. A gallon of water weighs several pounds. If you combine several thousand gallons of water moving against your home at a semi-rapid pace , your home is going to lose - plain and simple.

2b. Wind damage:

In my neck of the woods, most of the wind damage took form in the shape of falling tree limbs. If the limb has any amount of size to it and it falls on your house, your house will lose again. If you are in the losing part of the house, you might lose too. If the ground becomes saturated enough, the winds can also push the entire tree over by uprooting the tree. For some reason, pine trees seem to snap off about twenty feet off the ground.



3. Preparations

3a. Windows: To protect your home against wind damage, the most expedient method is plywood. Undoubtedly, you have seen news footage of homes in Florida preparing in this manner. The plywood is there to serve as a means of protecting your windows against flying debris. Obviously, this has limits. Hurricane Dennis picked up a section of my wooden privacy fence and it was airborne for over 100 feet. The plywood is there to keep smaller branches and other household debris from smashing through your windows. This is very important. Firstly, because it keeps the wind out of your house. If a 100+ mph wind enters your home with no place to exit, it will find a place to exit. Often times, it will blow your roof off. Secondly, the plywood is there to keep the rain out of your house. Hurricane-driven rain travels horizontally. If your window is smashed, your house will have water damage. You can minimize the damage after the storm by tearing out soaked carpeting and such. Dry things out as best as you can to prevent mold. Once mold gets in your home, it a REAL pain.

If you decide to board up your windows with plywood, you need to get to your local store and get it now. It will sell out much sooner than you think. It did for me and I spent six hours waiting in line for the next shipment to arrive. I would have liked to have had those six hours for doing other preps. If you have a brick home, you will want to get Tapcon screws and multiple masonry drill bits immediately. They will sell out just as quickly as the plywood.



If you are not able to get your hands on plywood, I observed a field-expedience method. If you have a wooden privacy fence, you can take down some of the fence panels and [securely] fasten them to your home covering your exposed windows.

3b. Important Documents

Locate these now. You will want a copy of your insurance papers / IDs / Birth certificates / Photo albums, etc. For myself, I have most of my photos on my computer, so I take the CPU when I leave. If you decide not to leave, put these documents in a room without a window so as to lessen the likelihood of damage.



4. Supplies

4a. Water.

Obviously, you need water to survive. After the storm, it will be likely that city supplied water may be cut off or contaminated. You will need to have an adequate supply to last you until you can obtain clean water. The easiest route is to purchase bottled water while supplies last. The least expensive route is to purchase water containers and simply fill them with tap water. Note: DO NOT use non food-grade containers for storage of drinking water. They will leach chemicals into your water supply. You MAY use non non-food grade containers for storing of non-potable water. Non-potable water is very important for washing your post-hurricane, nasty bodies and for washing clothes. Most importantly though, is that it can be used for flushing toilets. My in-laws spent several days conserving their non-potable water for flushing. They will tell you that a flushing toilet is the first convenience that they wanted restored, including electricity. For potable (drinking) water, a good container to purchase are the Reliance Aquatainers (blue cubes). They hold seven gallons and cost roughly seven dollars. It is recommended that you have at least one gallon of water per person, per day. However, I can tell you from personal experience that if you are working out in the sun doing heavy labor (cutting limbs, etc) you will drink more than one gallon of water.



If you have questionable water that needs to be purified, the two most easy methods are boiling and by using bleach. Bring the water to a rolling boil for several minutes and this will kill any of the bio-nasties inhabiting it previously. You can also use bleach to purify suspect water. Make sure that you are using the regular non-scented bleach. Do not use the “lemony fresh” as your body will react badly to it.

4b. Food.

If you don’t have a ready supply of canned food. Get it now. Oddly enough, I found the most useful food for me was canned ravioli. It has a pull-top lid and I had no problem with eating it cold. Those things are loaded with calories as well (over 500 per can). Do not buy food that will require refrigeration. Buy foods that your kids are familiar with and enjoy as it will make it easier to deal with the post hurricane situation. Boxes of macaroni and cheese are big hits and are easy to prepare requiring only the ability to boil water. When you pick up your food supplies, it isn’t a bad idea to purchase paper plates and plastic silverware. This will eliminate the requirement of washing your dishes after you eat, thereby conserving your non-potable water supply.

Oh yeah - make sure you have a can opener.

4c. Grills / Campstoves.

If you have a gas grill, make sure you have an ample supply of gas. If you have a charcoal grill, pick yourself up several bags of briquettes. If you don’t have a grill, you can purchase a propane campstove that will function using the one pound gas cylinders. I have a grill but preferred to use the campstove for most of my heating requirements. Do not use your gas grill or campstove indoors, unless you have a desire to see the inside of your county morgue.



4d. Information

Get a battery powered radio. If your community loses power, they will make radio stations a priority to restore. It will be your lifeline to useful information regarding water, electricity and the other things that we prefer to have around.

4e. Generators.

This is a pricey item and you may decide that you don’t need one or can’t afford one. You can survive without one, but they do make things easier if you have one. My neighbor didn’t have one for the first hurricane, but after seeing mine in use, he made sure to have one for the next hurricane. Honda is at the top of the food chain when it comes to generators, but they are also the most expensive. There is a link in the Survival Forum that should answer most of your generator questions. If you decide to get a generator, make sure that you have heavy-duty extension cords. I use 12 gauge cords that I use for my freezer. If you go cheap and use a light weight cord, you can kill your high-powered appliance.

I would recommend that you purchase a length of chain and a lock to secure your generator. It is not unheard of for some generators to walk off and find themselves in the homes of ne’er-do-wells. Obviously, if your generator cuts out on you - investigate the problem. Most likely, you will find that you have run out of gas. However, you just might find somebody trying to haul it off. In that case, these things are heavy and not easily moved. A prominent display of a firearm should convince the bad guys to leave the stash and find easier pickings. When not in use, you should lock your generator out of sight of prying eyes.

Do not use your generator inside your home or outside near open windows. Unless of course, you want to meet your local coroner. After each hurricane I experience, there were entire families that were found dead in their homes because of the built up fumes from a generator.

I found that it was the best use of electricity to only power my freezer and move my refrigerator items to a cooler. The freezer would produce the ice and I then didn’t have to put the load on my generator for keeping the refrigerator running.

Generator FAQ link

4f. Gasoline

Get some. Now.

If the hurricane knocks out the power to your community, you won’t be pumping gas. You will need to have enough on-hand to keep your vehicle running as well as your generator if you are using one. My Coleman Powermate (6250 watts) will drink five gallons of gasoline every twelve hours. Needless to say, I have a collection of gas containers. Storing your gas cans is tricky as well. I have a gas water heater in my garage that would react negatively to collected gas fumes. Find a storage location that will not expose them to a lit flame or energized electrical circuitry.

4g. Cash

If the phones and electricity are out, you won’t be using your credit cards. Cash is king and the ATMs won’t be working. Get cash prior to the storm.

4h. Lights

I have a propane lantern that I love. It lights up very brightly and is the cat’s ass when my neighborhood is electrically deficient. Do not use indoors unless you like hanging out at your local funeral parlor. I use candles very sparingly. Keep in mind that without phones, there isn’t 911. Without 911, the fire department will only realize that your home is ablaze when they see the smoke plume. By that time, it’s too late. When I use candles, I use my wife’s Yankee Candles because the flame is semi-shielded. I put them up high where a child cannot reach them or knock them over. My fireplace mantle is excellent for this. I do not use them when I move from room-to-room as it is easy to trip over poorly lit extension cords and like items. Instead, I only use battery powered lights when moving around the house after dark. If you do use candles, I would recommend keeping a bucket of water or fire extinguisher nearby.



4i. Chain saw.

You may want one of these to clear any downed limbs after the storm. For myself, I didn’t get one because my father-in-law has one and I knew that I could borrow it when he was finished. If you decide to use one, I would recommend limiting it to only clearing limbs that have to be cleared. Remember, without phone lines, you do not have 911 ambulance service if you confuse your leg with a limb. Keep in mind that you will be very tired dealing with the aftermath of the storm and you are more prone to accidents when you are tired.

5. Looters Undocumented Shoppers

We at Arfcom love to prepare for looters. This may or may not be an important part of your preparations. You know your community the best. I live in a redneck suburbia and the looting was almost an unheard of event. I still kept my black rifle and revolver on hand, but in my experience were never required. If you live next to the projects or a neighborhood with less than savory characters, you may find a need to protect your belongings. Word to the wise however, make sure that you know what your target is before you engage. One of our local townsfolk heard some noises coming down the road and decided to take action based on some not so well thought out ideas. He discharged a shotgun in the direction of the approaching individuals only to later discover that he was shooting at our local Sheriff Deputies who were on patrol looking for bad-guys. Always identify your target! Needless to say, the deputies were less than impressed with his decision making processes and introduced him to the judicial system. My impression of looters is that 9 times out of 10, they will bolt when they see an armed homeowner. In the other cases, I would be very surprised to find any Arfcom member to be outgunned by any “Two-Bit Tommy.”

Nighttime without electricity is difficult. Your normal street lights will not be functioning as well as your security lights. My propane lantern will burn over 10 hours on a one pound cylinder of gas. Placing one of these out by my generator kept my yard illuminated quite well. I would imagine that looters prefer to operate in the cover of darkness and would avoid a well-lit home. Of course, we have all seen the “You loot, I shoot” signs and I would imagine that these will dissuade others as well. Weapon lights are very handy to have and are now on my shopping list.

If you have a dog, use them. My dog is a over-the-hill terrier, but she knew to put herself on-duty at night. She would growl whenever a neighbor walked down the street and served as an efficient alarm system.



6. The Police.

These folks are going to be overworked and very tired. Our community had a dusk-to-dawn curfew imposed immediately following the storm. Anyone found off their property during these hours could be arrested and held. Now - a lot of you are going to bristle at that. But, here’s how the curfew was used - If you were found walking your dog in your neighborhood after curfew, the police would check and see if you indeed actually belonged there. If so, no problem. If you were in your car and driving to the hospital to pull your shift, the police would wave at you and wish you a “travel safely and good night”. If they found “Two-Bit Tommy” in your neighborhood (not his) after dark and he had burglary tools in his pockets, and it was obvious that he was up to no good, the police could arrest him for a curfew violation instead of having to catch him going through somone's window. Of course, those that were arrested for curfew violations were held in the county jail until the courts could open. As I recall, that wasn’t until after electricity had been restored to the community. Your police and milage may vary.


Hopefully, those if you who may find yourself in the path of Rita may find some of this to be useful.

Johnny
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 9:20:08 PM EDT
Excellent info., good luck men!
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 9:21:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 9:21:28 PM EDT by TheSneak]
Don't forget high-quality masonry drill bits (of the proper size of course) if you have to use the tapcons! You'll go through them like crazy.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 9:27:12 PM EDT
appreciate you lookin out for us texas folk
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 9:54:09 PM EDT
Nicely laid out Johnny..one more thing about the plywood, you can use something called Plylox if your Home Depot or Lowe's carries them. They have worked well for me without having to drill holes or the time consuming other ways of attaching plywood. Remember guys, if your windows get a hole punched it will then become a lifting force to your roof. This is why during Andrew so many people lost their roofs and their homes. Keep the wind out and your house will be somewhat protected and stay together better. The wind can get it's hooks into the roof and lift it up if the windows are intact.

Good luck guys..have your stuff done now and keep a good battery/wind-up/solar-powered radio for information handy after the storm.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:47:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 7:47:58 AM EDT by BigDozer66]
Excellent post!

We live 2 hours North of Houston but I will be checking everything that can be blown away as we will probably have 60 to 80+ MPH winds if it goes on it's present projected path.

BigDozer66

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 12:09:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:

Originally Posted By cjklekar:

you forgot the beer

+1
Pray that this thing makes landfall on a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast. I believe we will be plenty prepared. Talked to some folks today that evaced Galveston. They think that Houston will get soaked and flooded again.



i'm IN a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast!!!!!!!!!!!!



Can you some how direct the storm towards your area
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 12:55:08 PM EDT
From a former Texan,Y'all be safe!!!
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 5:42:42 PM EDT
After just getting done with Katrina here in South MS. The best advice for the people on the Texas coast from me would be leave. Don't underestimate the power of these things. Just to add to the list from the original poster, we live in the rural parts of south MS and did'nt have power restored for 17 days. If you stay, you will be without power for awhile, get a small window AC to be powered by the generator. You'll be glad you did after a fews days. But as i mentioned above, the best thing to do is just leave. I have never been one to be afraid of storms but after Katrina, i told my wife that i will never stay again if facing a Cat 3 or more.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 6:33:29 PM EDT
Hurri-bump.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 6:37:56 PM EDT
good info for the people in the path
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 6:44:30 PM EDT
Same concept, different reason....

I never enter the winter without 20 gallons of Kerosene. I witnessed two yuppie accountant types nearly come to blows over a gallon kerosene in our bad ice storm of 1996, which really trashed the grid. Power was out for a while, and unlike with power outages from a hurricane, it will get very cold very quickly. Within hours there was not a kerosene heater, nor the kerosene to fuel it left in the entire area. Hell, even most fuel containers were sold out... Panic'd people do stupid things!

It's FAR better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it...
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:06:17 PM EDT
Thanks guys for posting this.

I'm now going to have my wife read it ALOUD since she so far seems to be most concerned with the fact that Mig just got booted from the INXS stoopid shit reality show and we are 72 hours from landfall of a Cat 4 in Houston.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 4:45:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NAKED-GUNMAN:
Nicely laid out Johnny..one more thing about the plywood, you can use something called Plylox if your Home Depot or Lowe's carries them. They have worked well for me without having to drill holes or the time consuming other ways of attaching plywood. Remember guys, if your windows get a hole punched it will then become a lifting force to your roof. This is why during Andrew so many people lost their roofs and their homes. Keep the wind out and your house will be somewhat protected and stay together better. The wind can get it's hooks into the roof and lift it up if the windows are intact.

Good luck guys..have your stuff done now and keep a good battery/wind-up/solar-powered radio for information handy after the storm.




I've seen the Plylox at Home Depot but just didn't know if they seemed sturdy enough. I decided I would wait and see if anyone had used them and gave a positive report. They do seem like that would be a dandy time saver though!


www.plylox.com/
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 5:19:20 AM EDT
Very good post!. Alot of info that I never realized, but fortunatly I'm to far inland to really have to worry about it. (4 hours north of Houston, 3 hours east of Dallas) After seeing what happend in NO I will defantly create a SHTF stash, your tips are very helpfull for that as well.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:14:36 AM EDT
I'm ready for this thing. I've had my eye on a 12-pack of Heineken for some time now.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:27:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cjklekar:

you forgot the beer

+1
Pray that this thing makes landfall on a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast. I believe we will be plenty prepared. Talked to some folks today that evaced Galveston. They think that Houston will get soaked and flooded again.



i'm IN a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast!!!!!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 2:48:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:58:11 PM EDT
1-800-621-FEMA (3362)

It will be a pain to register over the phone. Wait until 2:00AM or do it online at www.FEMA.gov.
KEEP ALL YOUR RECEIPTS. No guarantee the government will reimburse you. Every disaster is different. It is better to have proof of expenses than not. Especially important for chainsaws, generators, and lodging. Register for FEMA even if you think you may not be eigible. You never know what programs become available. Could be something as simple as disaster unemployment benefits or more imporant like temporary housing.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:06:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Great post.

If any of our texas members anticipate having any particular needs that can't be met locally, let us know.



Same here
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:31:55 AM EDT
you forgot the beer
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:45:04 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 9:56:44 AM EDT

you forgot the beer

+1
Pray that this thing makes landfall on a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast. I believe we will be plenty prepared. Talked to some folks today that evaced Galveston. They think that Houston will get soaked and flooded again.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 1:27:52 PM EDT
What the condition gonna be in Dallas? Should I be concerned?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 1:30:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Melvinator2k0:
What the condition gonna be in Dallas? Should I be concerned?



Yes, but only because you're stuck in Dallas.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 1:33:32 PM EDT
I ain't budging until the federal government tells me how to save myself. Then if it means leaving I'm not gonna go until they send a limousine for me.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 1:51:31 PM EDT
Add a couple of items to this list.

1) Create yourself an emergency response plan.
The one I have dictacts what the wife and I are responsible for in the event of a hurricane or terrorist attack. Who gets the kid, where to meet, how to handle situations.

Since I travel a lot, it covers what the wife is to do while I'm trying to get home, and where to meet me in the event I can't make it home in time.

I print a copy of this for each vehicle glove box and each of us carries a USB key so they plan can be read on any computer. If she's at work, she can pop it in her PC and figure out what to do. Make sure you format the USB key as a FAT32 and not NTFS filesystem, otherwise older Windows 98/ME systems won't be able to read it.

2) Remember that homeowners insurance does NOT cover rising waters, i.e. flood waters. Your HO policy only covers falling water... rain, broken windows, blown off roof, etc. If you are in a low lying area make sure you have flood insurance if you want everything covered.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:16:08 PM EDT
Great post-thanks!
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:38:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheSneak:
Don't forget high-quality masonry drill bits (of the proper size of course) if you have to use the tapcons! You'll go through them like crazy.




And a good quality hammer drill will help the bits last longer. Much faster than a standard drill for Tapcon pilot holes in brick.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:35:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:42:47 PM EDT
Good Post!!!
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:52:34 PM EDT
Great post. Very useful, very informative information. My department is gearing up now to help with evacuating the Gulf Coast if the need arises.

I've been considering the Honda generator...I need to pull out the Coleman stove to see if it still works.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:12:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 8:12:24 PM EDT by Dace]
If anyone is coming to Az for whatever reason and you need anything just IM or e-mail me, I will send you my cell number for when you get here.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:36:46 PM EDT
Last couple of weeks after KAtrina my wife was giving me crap about planning BOB, getting 2 way radios, shortwave, H2O purification, planning evacuation routes. Today she is on the verge of freaking out. However, the late nite trip last nite for food, water, batteries no longer seems like "a waste of time"
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 5:31:05 AM EDT
Excellent summary.

FYI - 1 gallon of seawater weighs 8.44 lb and 1 gallon of fresh water weighs 8.22 lb.


Link Posted: 9/21/2005 5:55:57 AM EDT
Great post.

If any of our texas members anticipate having any particular needs that can't be met locally, let us know.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:58:17 AM EDT
.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 4:43:50 PM EDT
Hang tough, brothers!
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:59:04 PM EDT
Great post!

While the current hurricane isn’t an issue for me, I do think I’m going to start shopping around for a small camp stove. Between boiling water and heating food, that sounds like something really worth having.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 8:01:19 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 6:34:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Melvinator2k0:
What the condition gonna be in Dallas? Should I be concerned?



concerened, yeah, panicked, no.

There is a large possibility of power outages. So propane, batteries and beer w/ Ice.

TXL
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 10:59:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:

Originally Posted By cjklekar:

you forgot the beer

+1
Pray that this thing makes landfall on a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast. I believe we will be plenty prepared. Talked to some folks today that evaced Galveston. They think that Houston will get soaked and flooded again.



i'm IN a sparsely populated area of the Texas coast!!!!!!!!!!!!



Yeah and now you should be in the clear
Man I should have stayed my rear in Rockport instead of coming back to this crap.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 1:30:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheSneak:
Don't forget high-quality masonry drill bits (of the proper size of course) if you have to use the tapcons! You'll go through them like crazy.



Also, When using tapcons, it is best to use a hammer drill. Drill into the Brick Not the morter.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 2:05:01 PM EDT
Frame house in D'Iberville, MS about a week after Katrina:



If you live in a frame house and you're in the cone, you should get the fuck out ASAP.

That said, if you have block/brick or sturdy frame and you are hanging in there here are some tips:


House prep:

There is a reason that most Fl construction is block. Even then we board up so we don't lose the roof. I would suggest boarding up yours as well. If you are lucky and the winds are not strong enough to scrub your house off the slab, they may be bad enough to breach your windows and lead to a roof failure. Use 3/4 plywood and screw it into the frame every 18" If you can't get ply then get OSB. If block use long tapcons.

Clear your yard and strongly urge your neighbors to clear theirs of all unsecured objects. Even the heavy stuff. Hurricane winds will lift big grills and wrought iron tables. Empty your shed if you want to keep the stuff inside, it probably won't make it in heavy winds.

Your garage door is your weakest point in the house. Screw 2x4 braces across it in order to stiffen it and consider screwing it into the walls. Parallel park a car across the width of the door as close as you can get to further prevent it being sucked out. If your garage door goes, your house goes.


You can see how I parked my van (on the right)to block the garage. The blue pickup was pulled up all the way to the front doors. We have double french doors in front that have no stability at all.

Thin out your trees of excess foliage, esp if you have big live oaks. The weight of the water and the increased surface area makes the big limbs and the whole tree more vulnerable to the twisting effect of the wind.


My neighbors live oak broke off about 10 ft up and took down the power poles for our whole subdivision.

If you stay in the house and board up, keep heavy tools in the room you are in. You may have to cut, lever, pry or bash your way out of a boarded window or an exterior wall after the storm.

Make a shelter in your safe room. Take the legs off a dining room table or something sturdy like that. Lean it against a desk or endtables or a tipped over fridge and secure it. Don't take shelter under something horizontal (like a desk or table) in a building collapse. Shelter under something on a diagonal. People are often found crushed under things (like cars and desks) but found alive between two cars or a car and a wall or under a bookcase that fell against a wall.


Other stuff:
Freeze as many gallon jugs or other containers of water as you can. If you don't have one, go get a deep freezer from Sear or somewhere. You can use the freezer as your fridge with the ice jugs when the power goes off. Regular standup fridges are useless.

If you have central air, get a window A/C unit and a floor fan (assumes you have a genny).

Buy a shitload of water and fill every container you have.

Fill every gas can, car, mower, boat tank, etc. Get a siphon.

Have heavy gloves and boots in your safe room.

If you don't have a chainsaw, get one. You will need it. Oh and lots of bar oil and mix oil. It is impossinble to find after a storm.

Have some white, black and orange spray paint available. You may need it afterwards.

Get tarps. furring strips, rolls of screen, roofing nails and 2x4s - you will need to repair things (like a roof) and these will be impossible to find for a few weeks after.



You'll have time right up until the storm hits to do these things. Keep at it until it's time to close up. Believe me, you'll know when that happens.

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