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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/27/2004 3:10:08 AM EST

ZI have alterior motives but the AWB sunset is almost upon us and we need fixin up!

ZI personally say 50 bucks would be guaranteed deal, I'd even go a little higher depending if I knew the preson threading.

XI know someone out there either has a lathe or is in the market for one and to offset the cost of lathe and dies, how much would you lock in for?

XIf we get enough folks that would commit to the threading and maybe even prepay if needed we could all have a threading party and get it done.

9Anyone have any better ideas on this? Any gunsmiths want this action?

9I'll prepay now if needed, I want my FS!



Link Posted: 8/27/2004 3:12:16 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 4:53:37 AM EST

Originally Posted By BookHound:
For some reason I'm thinking I need to call zzxx99.




Would he touch a god damned dirty commie gun?
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 5:12:50 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 5:31:29 AM EST
Count me in! I need to de-Monica my AR.

I'm thinking $25-30 would be a fair rate for threading, it shouldn't take much time .... of course I may be clueless about what it would entail .... I've been wrong before.

Link Posted: 8/27/2004 6:43:22 AM EST
I just tossed out $50 per so we could help out 'someone' get the lathe and dies and all.

negotiable of course but if we dont get enough folks to commit 'he' might not be able to afford the equip and stuff up front without knowing 'he' could make his money back.

I'd still pay 50 to have my bbl threaded, it would be SO worth it to me.


Bookhound, I ordered my 6pos stock from those guys today. Thanks for the advice.
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 7:00:19 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 8:36:15 AM EST
My ears were burning so here I am.

I'm still shopping for a lathe big enough to properly do barrel work. By properly I mean the threads will be lathe-cut, not via a die. Given proper setup, the goal is threads that are concentric to the bore. This is so you could safely mount a suppressor to the finished barrel and be assured there'd be no baffle strikes.

Once the barrel is in a fixture, the end of the barrel would be turned to size. Then a thread-cutting pass is done to the barrel. Then refinishing is required.

Or you could go quick-n-dirty; turn the end to size by putting the barrel in a three jaw chuck, thread it with a die, screw on a flash hider and be done. Or some enterprising soul will start making pin-on FHs that slip over the postban barrel profile.

If you're in a hurry I heard Rusty Kidd (David's Gun Room??) will do threading after the ban. I know I won't be ready by then.

fyi
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 12:55:14 PM EST
Speaking of prices, I had my AR barrel threaded by ADCO for $50, and my 10FP threaded by SWR for my can for $100. Diff was of course the 10FP had to have the barrel removed and reheadspaced, the AR barrel was new, so it was easy to chuck in the lathe. You want it done on a lathe too. It's not an AK you're just wanting a slant comp on, and since the barrel comes off an AR so easy, might as well do it right.
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 1:06:02 PM EST
So I am guessing it will have a pass thru chuck to handle the barrel length. Cut threads would definitely be better. What depth threads are we talking about here? Would it be better to do it in a couple passes? Hmmm, you would also be able to add knurling, that might make a unique looking finish.

I just wanted to fit into the conversation, not much machining talk when you are surrounded by computer nerds and neophytes.


ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 3:51:07 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 5:38:14 PM EST
I'm not trying to post and EE ad, but a guy at work has a Clausing Lathe for 2450 at work. I have all his contact info if anyone's interested.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:59:37 AM EST
I guess I should NOT use the tap and die set that I just bought at Ace Hardware for the job.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 7:04:09 AM EST

Originally Posted By ByteTheBullet:
So I am guessing it will have a pass thru chuck to handle the barrel length. Cut threads would definitely be better. What depth threads are we talking about here? Would it be better to do it in a couple passes? Hmmm, you would also be able to add knurling, that might make a unique looking finish.

I just wanted to fit into the conversation, not much machining talk when you are surrounded by computer nerds and neophytes.


ByteTheBullet (-:



Byte,
The best way to do it is with the barrel passed through the headstock,with an adjustable "spider" (support) on the back side to hold it straight,and the muzzle sticking out just far enough to thread it.
The second best way,is for the breech end to be in the chuck,and the muzzle end supported by a steady rest,but this requires a longer lathe.(A steady rest has three fingers that come in radialy to support the work piece)
The other way is with a piloted die.This should work okay,but as noted,a lathe does a better job.
I for one have a hard time getting a die to cut on center on a bolt or unthreaded rod,but it could just be my shade tree methods
That is why I haven't tried threading a barrel with a die yet!

As for depth of the threads,they have to be at full depth,or the other part won't fit unless it is a sloppy fit anyway.
This is standard v threads ,not any kind of square,acme or other flat profile ones.
As long as the barrel outdside diameter is correct,once the threads become v shpaed with sharp tops and roots,you should be done.
In most non production type shops,it will require several passes.A production shop might have a set up to do them in one pass,
or roll them,but that wouldn't work very good on a barrel,(unless you wanted a choke!).

As for knurling,
The only gun I know of that had knurled barrels were the ones someone clamped in a bench vise or used a pipe wrench on
It might look kind of neat,and be useful on a competition gun that you were clamping weights to the barrel to keep them from moving without so much clamp pressure.
ButI don't know if it would have any adverse effect on the harmonics or vibrations,so it might not be such a hot idea on a competition gun.
If the knurling was cut with a pointed tool,I don't think it would have much effect.But if it was rolled in using a knurling tool,it might require enough force to squeeze the barrel slightly.This would give you the same choke effect,which might actuall helpa little on a bore that had muzzle wear!

There was a model of shotgun that did not have a charging handle.It had a knurled portion of the barrel to grasp so you could pull it to the rear to charge the gun(I think it was recoil operated like an A 5 Browning,and you could do a hump back that way if you had arms like Popeye!)
Hope this help,Robert.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 8:15:52 AM EST
Thanks gamachinist, brings back memories of school!! I let my Father-in-law borrow my Machinery's Handbook and I used to just flip through it when I needed a 'fix'.


ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:06:23 PM EST
my barrel was already threaded, but i've got to tell you guys, kevin over at AAC is the man. he sold and installed a quick-attach flashider for me for $75. now, maybe it was the fact that i was there with Azalin, and they know each other pretty well, but still...it's a $95 part to any other person coming in, plus install.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 9:34:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By zzxx99:
If you're in a hurry I heard Rusty Kidd (David's Gun Room??) will do threading after the ban. I know I won't be ready by then.

fyi



Called them and spoke with Russ.

They are going to charge $100.00 for threading an AR barrel, if they (the owners) decide to do it at all He also mentioned that if he did do it now, he'd have me sign a piece of paper stating that I am going to install this on a pre-ban lower

Moving on....

Where is ADCO? How is their turnaround time? 50 is better than 100 all day!

"Kevin over at AAC is the man"...what is AAC? I am missing the boat apparently.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 6:57:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2004 7:05:59 PM EST by Quarterbore]
I have an Atlas 12 x 36 lathe and my lathe is quite capable of doing the work... The problem is getting all the tools (just need the cutting tools now) and the time to practice... My lathe is an engine lathe and she can cut some remarkable threads but I don't know if I am capable of helping do these in the next couple weeks....

Now, I have a video on building a FAL from Arazona Response Systems and in that video they showed how to turn down a barrel on a bench grinder and belt sander and then thread a FAL barrel using a hand tap. It was done by using a small piece of threaded barrel with an alignment pin and the tap was started on this small piece of barrel and then threaded onto the barrel that needs to be threaded. This was done to ensure alignment with the bore....

Now, most people will likely never get a silencer so a tap method may work fine... for those that may use a silencer some day I think you would prefer a lathe cut barrel as that will be concentric to the bore of the gun which is critical...

I just wish I had some vacation time to play with the lathe!

Here is some useful information: dynasystems-ltd.com/GunFile/ThrInstr.html and the same ideas as I was trying to describe...
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:52:46 PM EST


"Kevin over at AAC is the man"...what is AAC? I am missing the boat apparently.




AAC=Advanced Armament Co. in Lilburn, GA. Actually I'm not sure if "C" stands for Company, Corp....ect, but that's not important.

I don't want to get anything started here, but prior to doing any business with kevin at AAC I'd urge you to check the archives on sunguns and sturmgewehr.

For the record I've NEVER done business with Kevin and I'd think twice prior to doing so based on the stories and "his" responses to the above mentioned threads. I've didn't say I wouldn't do business with him, but I'd use extreme caution.

TD
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 3:12:21 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 4:12:52 AM EST
Anything over $25, and I would just replace the barrel.

I understand the costs involved in custom machine work, but it is more cost effective to go with a new unit.

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