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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/31/2005 10:05:56 PM EDT
After seeing the teachers that have been imported from the Philipines...I am so glad that my kids go to private school. This is not a racist comment so please don't take it that way... one of my favorite uncles that passed was Philipino. Kids and teachers already have enough problems and then then to add another factor (English not being their primary langauge).... I think the school district is going to have quite a few problems.

....also, what about the kids who don't speak English very well and now these teachers will have an accent that may even drive a bigger wedge. I think the State needs to pony up some more funds for teacher and to keep the ones we already have from leaving.


thanks,
Ron
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 5:39:35 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 7:14:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wolfpack:
Paying teachers more isn't the answer, they are overpaid as it is. I would however be in favor of a pay raise if the school district would quit blowing money on buildings like the one they just bought on Sahara. About half of everyone's property tax is for schools, how much more could they need?



My friend's wife is a school teacher who just recently started and is only taking home $1,300 a month after she pays for her insurance. She wanted the better insurance so it comes out of her check.

thanks,
Ron
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 8:35:21 AM EDT
Thats Airman First Class Pay.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:24:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:53:36 AM EDT
Obviously, the level of accent is going to matter, but I do know that most of the civilized parts of the PI are taught English. Of the ones that i have met (the wife's a teacher) they are damn hard workers--the first to arrive, last to leave every night. They don't complain, they made do. If kids can see past the accent, and get just a bit of that work ethic (selling Sunday papers on the street corner is NOT work) our kids would benefit quite a bit.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:20:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By chiz45:
Obviously, the level of accent is going to matter, but I do know that most of the civilized parts of the PI are taught English. Of the ones that i have met (the wife's a teacher) they are damn hard workers--the first to arrive, last to leave every night. They don't complain, they made do. If kids can see past the accent, and get just a bit of that work ethic (selling Sunday papers on the street corner is NOT work) our kids would benefit quite a bit.



+1

The majority of kids in the PI are actually taught English before Tagalog. Although some might learn their local language before they get to school.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:18:10 PM EDT
I for one think that education is a labor of love, and not a real smart "Get Rich Quick" scheme...

Teachers are underpaid in my humble opinion, having said that, FUCK NEW TAXES!!! I pay enuff, tax and bill all of the pricks that have kids in the system and dont feel the need to contribute in any way , shape or form. The deadbeats, crack heads, illegals and the "Taxes are unconstitutional" crowd.......(just to name a few).

Matter-0-fact, lets box'em up and UPS'em to Kalifornia.

Moral will drasticly improve and the work load will be cut in half.

Now that I got that off my chest, take the rest of the day off.
"G"
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 2:16:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wolfpack:
Paying teachers more isn't the answer, they are overpaid as it is. I would however be in favor of a pay raise if the school district would quit blowing money on buildings like the one they just bought on Sahara. About half of everyone's property tax is for schools, how much more could they need?



I do not believe that teachers are overpaid...for the service that they can "potentially" provide, i believe that they are not compensated enough.

I have worked briefly in undergrad teaching...and teaching is mentally exhausting...so much so that im not sure that i could be paid ENOUGH to pursue a career in education.

Remember, a LOT of the work is outside of school hours. Grading, lesson plans, etc....

Keep paying teachers low wages, and we will have a constant influx of crappy teachers...as the good teachers attempt to better themselves with continuing education, and movement to universities..and/or research positions....leaving the gradeschool institutions wanton for quality educators (that they are not willing to compensate appropriately).

However, with all of that said, if you value your children's education, and if you have the means, for God's sake, please send them to private school...where your tuition will be used to better the educational process, rather than the glut of tax dollars used to erect giant football stadiums/stupid custom sculpture work in the front foier/and new uniforms for the jocks.

Private schools produce college bound students with bright futures in MUCH higher percentages than public schools.

Link Posted: 8/1/2005 2:46:07 PM EDT
My wife teaches at a private school and sadly makes much less than if she were in the school district. But she absolutely loves her job, and the kids are great.
As ARin said the majority of the time a QUALITY teacher puts in, is the time spent on the Lesson plans, grading, inputing grades, keeping class website info current, curriculum changes, communication with parents, striving to find "fresh" material/activities, portfolios, Accelerated Reader tests, ... Icould go on and on... I know that my wife puts in 50-60+ hrs/week to stay on top of things.
Allocation of the money and accountability of expenditures seem to be the big problem with the district.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 2:52:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 2:54:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chiz45:
Obviously, the level of accent is going to matter, but I do know that most of the civilized parts of the PI are taught English. Of the ones that i have met (the wife's a teacher) they are damn hard workers--the first to arrive, last to leave every night. They don't complain, they made do. If kids can see past the accent, and get just a bit of that work ethic (selling Sunday papers on the street corner is NOT work) our kids would benefit quite a bit.



I feel the accent will be a hard one to deal with. The school district is NOT putting these teachers in the better schools... but in the lower performing schools. A majority of the kids at the lower performing schools are Latino and some already have a problem with the English langauge to begin with. Now, you throw a Mexican (legal or not) kid who has hard time understanding English and have a Philipina teacher who might have a heavy accent and there are going to be some problems.

It kind of reminds me of the scene in the movie with Cheech (from Cheech and Chong) called "Born in the East LA" where the Mexican (Cheech) was teaching the Chinese illegals how to speak "Mexican"...
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:06:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 3:13:06 PM EDT by chiz45]

Originally Posted By Sparky357:
My wife teaches at a private school and sadly makes much less than if she were in the school district. But she absolutely loves her job, and the kids are great.
As ARin said the majority of the time a QUALITY teacher puts in, is the time spent on the Lesson plans, grading, inputing grades, keeping class website info current, curriculum changes, communication with parents, striving to find "fresh" material/activities, portfolios, Accelerated Reader tests, ... Icould go on and on... I know that my wife puts in 50-60+ hrs/week to stay on top of things.
Allocation of the money and accountability of expenditures seem to be the big problem with the district.



What surprised me over and above the extra hours (grading, impromptu parent teacher conferences--they just drop by) was the money that teachers spend out of their own pockets for their classes. They need learning tools and games for their classes? Or prizes for exceptional behavior? They are at Learning is Fun buying stuff. Sure, SOME of it is reimbursed, but it's pretty inspiring when you go there weeks before class to see the dedicated few who are they diligently and meticulously setting up their class rooms for their incoming class.

As for the language issue, sounds like my kids will have an advantage, if the grandparents (Lolo and Lola) keep talking to them in Tagalog


Originally Posted By DoctorCheney223:
I feel the accent will be a hard one to deal with. The school district is NOT putting these teachers in the better schools... but in the lower performing schools. A majority of the kids at the lower performing schools are Latino and some already have a problem with the English langauge to begin with. Now, you throw a Mexican (legal or not) kid who has hard time understanding English and have a Philipina teacher who might have a heavy accent and there are going to be some problems.



I think it's a little premature to judge the accent before you actually hear it This is no different than the Chinese or Russian Calculus teacher that I had in high school. Couldn't understand a damn thing they were saying, and you'd have to bust ass reading the text book.

As for teacher placement, teachers are free to apply at diffferent schools. Some go to schools closer to where they live, for an easier commute; some because of better teacher support; etc. Some pick schools with lower learning disabled kids. If the County is utilizing 'plug and play' with these teachers, they will go to where there are openings.

Some communities (green valley, to be specific) provide tremendous support for their schools. My wife worked at one in GVR, and saying how in a student fund raising venture, the community/parents raised some crazy amount of money, like $40k. You can't get a tenth of that in some of the less affluent communities.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:18:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 3:19:28 PM EDT by bthp223]
Here's a link to anyone that might be interested www.tcs-lasvegas.org/

Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:11:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 4:12:26 PM EDT by DoctorCheney223]
Originally Posted By chiz45:

This is no different than the Chinese or Russian Calculus teacher that I had in high school. Couldn't understand a damn thing they were saying, and you'd have to bust ass reading the text book.


Very true.... I remember in my biochemistry class we had a professor from Vietnam. There was a "book of TRANslastions" for Dr. TRAN. My favorite was when you heard him talking about motorcycle rides... he was actaully talking about monosaccharides....

thanks,
Ron
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:25:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 4:26:02 PM EDT by Sparky357]
Chiz, you sure got that right. The amount of $$$ out of pocket is insane. But if that teacher wants to go above and beyond, $$$ is very important. I hope you don't mind the edit...Learning is...


Originally Posted By chiz45:
What surprised me over and above the extra hours (grading, impromptu parent teacher conferences--they just drop by) was the money that teachers spend out of their own pockets for their classes. They need learning tools and games for their classes? Or prizes for exceptional behavior? They are at Learning is Fun Expensive buying stuff. Sure, SOME of it is reimbursed, but it's pretty inspiring when you go there weeks before class to see the dedicated few who are they diligently and meticulously setting up their class rooms for their incoming class.

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