Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/29/2006 4:09:03 AM EDT
CULPEPER, Va., March 21 — George Allen makes little secret that he is bored with life in the Senate.

"I made more decisions in half a day as governor than you can make in a whole week in the Senate," Senator Allen said earlier this month as he dashed into a recent Republican fund-raiser in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Over eggs and hash browns with a Republican crowd in Davenport, he lamented about being in the Senate, "It's too slow for me."

So he expects that Virginians will vote for him in November so he can continue to be bored?
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 4:13:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NevisRuprecht:
CULPEPER, Va., March 21 — George Allen makes little secret that he is bored with life in the Senate.

"I made more decisions in half a day as governor than you can make in a whole week in the Senate," Senator Allen said earlier this month as he dashed into a recent Republican fund-raiser in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Over eggs and hash browns with a Republican crowd in Davenport, he lamented about being in the Senate, "It's too slow for me."

So he expects that Virginians will vote for him in November so he can continue to be bored?



We need bored politicians! Do you think Chucky Shumer or Barbra Boxer is bored? They probably stay up half the night writing bills to further limit our freedom. George Allen will ALWAYS have my vote. I hope he runs for pres.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 4:55:09 AM EDT
Is America ready for another George?
Mar 28, 2006
by Eliot Peace ( bio | archive )

Email to a friend Print this page Text size: A A Senator George Allen (R-VA), the third subject in Townhall.com’s series on potential 2008 presidential contenders, visited South Carolina this past Friday. As keynote speaker, Allen drew in the crowds to a fundraiser for Ralph Norman, Republican candidate for South Carolina’s 5th Congressional district. After his speech, Allen sat down with Townhall.com to discuss his thoughts on today’s issues and what the future holds for conservative politics. Included here are excerpts from both the speech and exclusive interview.

COLUMBIA, SC -- George Allen is a serious contender for the Republican nomination for president. A former governor, he wears cowboy boots and can often be found outside with his can of dip. Consequently, some Republicans like Allen, because he seems the most like George W. Bush—a charge Allen can’t quite understand, and frankly, rejects. "I don’t know why people say that," he said. "My two role models are Thomas Jefferson and Ronald Reagan. Most people who know me think I’m most like Ronald Reagan." At the start of his speech, Allen proclaimed himself a "common sense, Jeffersonian conservative" and later quoted Patrick Henry. In fact, his talking points on government were so similar to Reagan’s that it seemed as if he had just read a few of the Gipper’s speeches on the way down to South Carolina.

Allen passionately emphasized his Reagenesque fiscal conservatism and Jeffersonian ideals on limited government. Most of his speech focused on lessening government and lowering the burdens placed on businesses. It is business, he said, that really drives the American economy: "Free people should be able to make free decisions."


He added, "Government doesn’t create jobs […] but government should get the field ready." In other words, government should get out of the way.

One way for government to get out of the way is to lower taxes. "Washington doesn’t have a revenue problem; Washington has a spending problem," he said. "The taxpayers are the owners of the government. That’s who we [Congress] work for."

When asked if the Senate would take up tax reform in the near future, he replied, "Nothing has been proposed as far as legislation goes. Our focus right now needs to be on extending the tax cuts: the capital gains cut, the dividend cut, and the elimination of the death tax, which sunsets in 2010." Tax cuts equate to economic growth. He added, "The tax cuts since 2001 have created 5 million new jobs in the private sector."

Allen went on to argue that Congress should view the taxpayers’ money as its own and spend it frugally, just as members would spend their own paychecks. "We need to look at things and see if it is absolutely necessary to spend the taxpayers’ money," Allen argued.

Allen not only identified the problems with the government, but he offered some innovative solutions. He suggested a federal line-item veto. "I had it as governor of Virginia, and the president should have it as well.”

Allen is also an advocate of a federal balance budget amendment. "We need a balanced budget amendment in Congress." He added, "49 states required balanced budgets, so why doesn’t the federal government?" Ultimately, he has decided, "We need to focus on what’s essential: national defense and the military […] then we need to bind down Congress with the Constitution."

Perhaps his most innovative suggestion is the "Paycheck Penalty." Congress often doesn’t pass the appropriations bills in time and adds millions of dollars worth of pork spending at the last minute. "If Congress does not pass the appropriations bill by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, [congressmen’s] paychecks will be withheld. It’s their job; they need to get it done."

"Of course," he added laughingly, "that didn’t get a lot of support."

Allen also touched on immigration. He replied, "First and foremost, we need to secure our borders. They have been neglected." He highlighted the need for more personnel, more fences (both real and virtual), and more detention centers. "I don’t think we should reward illegal behavior […] you must punish illegal behavior, or you’ll get more illegal behavior." He also replied, "I’m not for amnesty […] I’m for immigration, but it must be legal immigration."

Of course, Allen couldn’t visit South Carolina and not field tough questions on social issues. When asked about abortion, he stated, "That should be decided by the states." He seemed to think the South Dakota ban is too strict and added, "I personally would add an exemption for rape and incest." If the Nebraska ban on partial birth abortion—which will soon be before the Supreme Court—is upheld, Allen foresees the Senate passing a ban again. "We did once, and it was held up."

Allen also defended the 2nd Amendment. "The 2nd Amendment is part of our Bill of Rights." "Law abiding citizens should be able to protect themselves and their property," he stated.

Unfortunate for Allen’s presidential prospect tour, the senator has an opponent for re-election. James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy running as the opposing Democrat. However, with the right effort and the same message on which Allen has delivered for Virginia since being in Congress, he should emerge victorious. "We’ll keep doing what we’re doing. He [Webb] is very formidable, but if we work hard and keep doing what we’re doing, we should be fine."

Allen is clearly the secret presidential frontrunner in the minds of many political types in South Carolina. These political types see two spots for contenders in the Republican primary: Senator John McCain and someone else. A lot of South Carolinians think Allen is that someone else. While McCain, Mitt Romney, Mike Huckabee and Bill Frist all have made trips to South Carolina in the past year, the consultants and strategists have all been hesitant to back anyone. Everyone is waiting for Allen to jump in.

The question remains though: is America ready for another George wearing cowboy boots?

Eliot Peace is a Townhall.com political reporter and a Project Manager for Starboard Communications, a conservative political marketing and strategy firm in Lexington, South Carolina.

Copyright © 2006 Townhall.com

Link Posted: 3/29/2006 5:15:37 AM EDT
I hate to say it, but I'm pretty sure that if Allen gets the nomination, Hillary will be our next pres.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 5:18:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Griz:
I hate to say it, but I'm pretty sure that if Allen gets the nomination, Hillary will be our next pres.

Yeah, lets get John McCain instead!

Link Posted: 3/29/2006 6:07:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:

Originally Posted By Griz:
I hate to say it, but I'm pretty sure that if Allen gets the nomination, Hillary will be our next pres.

Yeah, lets get John McCain instead!




McCain is a scumbag of the lowest order.... I think I'd rather have Hillary for 4 years so that the anti-incumbent backlash will be in our favor in 2012
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 7:04:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Griz:
I hate to say it, but I'm pretty sure that if Allen gets the nomination, Hillary will be our next pres.



Nope, not even close.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 7:16:29 AM EDT
I'm pretty sure he was referring to the slow pace and inefficiency of the Senate as a whole, not his own work ethic. In any event, that's fine with me. The less they get done, the less I have to worry about them f-ing things up - which appears to be their forte.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 7:23:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 7:23:33 AM EDT by Poodleshooter]
Hillary attracts way too much hatred. Her attempts to moderate her image have resulted in a lot of Democrat anger from the left,and haven't gained her anything other than the RINO votes she already had in liberal NY. She'll fall by the wayside.
I like the idea of a bored Senator. Like the news about this year's house of representatives having an extremely short session,this is a welcome change. I'd personally prefer that they get together for 1 week per year and simply repeal some of the thousands of useless laws already on our books.
While I would like Allen as a president, I don't think our increasingly liberal country will vote for him. He wouldn't give out as many goodies as the democrat or RINO challengers he would face.

Link Posted: 3/29/2006 4:24:58 PM EDT
Until this week I figured I would vote for McCain if he ran. I voted for him in the primarys when he ran against Bush. His stance on ill. immigration changed my mind in a hurry. I will not vote for anyone who supports anything but firmly securing our borders and ridding the country of as many illeagles as possible. Manpower and money to secure our borders is not a issue for me. If we can spend billions of dollars and hundreds of lives in Iraq we can and should spend it here to secure our borders. Hell, in the area I live in you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a Hispanic. McCain is too old now anyway. Look at that piece of trash Warner who's looking to reimpose another gun ban on us. The older these guys get and the longer they are in the Senate never bodes well for gun owners or anything else that requires guts. Perhaps it would be best for Allen to get out of the Senate and run for President while he is younger and is not poisoned by the Senate seat. I don't see anyone else in the Rep. Party that is more attractive as a canadate that Allen as of now. As for Hillery, the bottom line is, when men are in the voting booth by theirselves I don't think many will "pull the leaver" for her. If they do they may as well cut out their balls and leave them there too. I know her 1st cousin and even he says she's a man hater. He also says she is very smart and should not be underestimated. Her Accillies heel may be that she can't stand one-on-one critisim and comes unglued, letting the real Hillery out for everyone to see. Of course blood is thicker than water so he will probally vote for her anyway. I guess I'll call him a eunuch.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 4:42:21 PM EDT
+1 for George Allen in 2008!
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 6:20:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1srelluc:
<Snip>
Hell, in the area I live in you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a Hispanic.



Against all Hispanics being here or just the illegal ones? Not all Hispanics are illegal and not all illegals are Hispanics.
I am quite frankly more concerned about MS-13 from El Salvador in the area I live. Let's be clear about the problem.
Illegals from whatever country are a problem, race has nothing to do with it.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 6:32:08 PM EDT
great opinion here:

he does lead among conservatives, but there are alot of republicans with their heads up their asses....



s America ready for another George?

By Eliot Peace

Mar 28, 2006

Senator George Allen (R-VA), the third subject in Townhall.com’s series on potential 2008 presidential contenders, visited South Carolina this past Friday. As keynote speaker, Allen drew in the crowds to a fundraiser for Ralph Norman, Republican candidate for South Carolina’s 5th Congressional District. After his speech, Allen sat down with Townhall.com to discuss his thoughts on today’s issues and what the future holds for conservative politics. Included here are excerpts from both the speech and exclusive interview.

COLUMBIA, SC -- George Allen is a serious contender for the Republican nomination for president. A former governor, he wears cowboy boots and can often be found outside with his can of dip. Consequently, some Republicans like Allen, because he seems the most like George W. Bush—a charge Allen can’t quite understand, and frankly, rejects. "I don’t know why people say that," he said. "My two role models are Thomas Jefferson and Ronald Reagan. Most people who know me think I’m most like Ronald Reagan." At the start of his speech, Allen proclaimed himself a "common sense, Jeffersonian conservative" and later quoted Patrick Henry. In fact, his talking points on government were so similar to Reagan’s that it seemed as if he had just read a few of the Gipper’s speeches on the way down to South Carolina.

Allen passionately emphasized his Reagenesque fiscal conservatism and Jeffersonian ideals on limited government. Most of his speech focused on lessening government and lowering the burdens placed on businesses. It is business, he said, that really drives the American economy: "Free people should be able to make free decisions."

He added, "Government doesn’t create jobs […] but government should get the field ready." In other words, government should get out of the way.

One way for government to get out of the way is to lower taxes. "Washington doesn’t have a revenue problem; Washington has a spending problem," he said. "The taxpayers are the owners of the government. That’s who we [Congress] work for."

When asked if the Senate would take up tax reform in the near future, he replied, "Nothing has been proposed as far as legislation goes. Our focus right now needs to be on extending the tax cuts: the capital gains cut, the dividend cut, and the elimination of the death tax, which sunsets in 2010." Tax cuts equate to economic growth. He added, "The tax cuts since 2001 have created 5 million new jobs in the private sector."

Allen went on to argue that Congress should view the taxpayers’ money as its own and spend it frugally, just as members would spend their own paychecks. "We need to look at things and see if it is absolutely necessary to spend the taxpayers’ money," Allen argued.

Allen not only identified the problems with the government, but he offered some innovative solutions. He suggested a federal line-item veto. "I had it as governor of Virginia, and the president should have it as well.”

Allen is also an advocate of a federal balance budget amendment. "We need a balanced budget amendment in Congress." He added, "49 states required balanced budgets, so why doesn’t the federal government?" Ultimately, he has decided, "We need to focus on what’s essential: national defense and the military […] then we need to bind down Congress with the Constitution."

Perhaps his most innovative suggestion is the "Paycheck Penalty." Congress often doesn’t pass the appropriations bills in time and adds millions of dollars worth of pork spending at the last minute. "If Congress does not pass the appropriations bill by October 1, the start of the new fiscal year, [congressmen’s] paychecks will be withheld. It’s their job; they need to get it done."

"Of course," he added laughingly, "that didn’t get a lot of support."

Allen also touched on immigration. He replied, "First and foremost, we need to secure our borders. They have been neglected." He highlighted the need for more personnel, more fences (both real and virtual), and more detention centers. "I don’t think we should reward illegal behavior […] you must punish illegal behavior, or you’ll get more illegal behavior." He also replied, "I’m not for amnesty […] I’m for immigration, but it must be legal immigration."

Of course, Allen couldn’t visit South Carolina and not field tough questions on social issues. When asked about abortion, he stated, "That should be decided by the states." He seemed to think the South Dakota ban is too strict and added, "I personally would add an exemption for rape and incest." If the Nebraska ban on partial birth abortion—which will soon be before the Supreme Court—is upheld, Allen foresees the Senate passing a ban again. "We did once, and it was held up."

Allen also defended the 2nd Amendment. "The 2nd Amendment is part of our Bill of Rights." "Law abiding citizens should be able to protect themselves and their property," he stated.

Unfortunate for Allen’s presidential prospect tour, the senator has an opponent for re-election. James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy running as the opposing Democrat. However, with the right effort and the same message on which Allen has delivered for Virginia since being in Congress, he should emerge victorious. "We’ll keep doing what we’re doing. He [Webb] is very formidable, but if we work hard and keep doing what we’re doing, we should be fine."

Allen is clearly the secret presidential frontrunner in the minds of many political types in South Carolina. These political types see two spots for contenders in the Republican primary: Senator John McCain and someone else. A lot of South Carolinians think Allen is that someone else. While McCain, Mitt Romney, Mike Huckabee and Bill Frist all have made trips to South Carolina in the past year, the consultants and strategists have all been hesitant to back anyone. Everyone is waiting for Allen to jump in.

The question remains though: Is America ready for another George wearing cowboy boots?

Eliot Peace is a Townhall.com political reporter and a Project Manager for Starboard Communications, a conservative political marketing and strategy firm in Lexington, South Carolina.

Link Posted: 3/29/2006 7:22:38 PM EDT
Can we wait and see what his stance is on the Immigration bills that are floating around before we annoint him the next King?

Top Top